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Lamb


Bella S.F.
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Any opinions on whether you should buy domestic lamb or lamb imported from Australia? Is there much of a difference? Any opinions?

Thanks!

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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Why not buy both, taste them and give us your thoughts. It's spring in Australia now so if you can get the fresh stuff, it should be milder tasting and more tender now that it would be in april say, not that theres much of a difference either way. Australian lamb has more food miles on it if you care for that sort of thing.

As an Australian, I would say go for Australian lamb but I'm biased.

PS: I am a guy.

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The strength of flavour can depend on how much fat has been trimmed off, and that makes comparisons difficult.

If you find a local product, try to determine the breed, the farm location, and the feeding practices. A few butcher shops will co-operate.

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The strength of flavour can depend on how much fat has been trimmed off, and that makes comparisons difficult.

If you find a local product, try to determine the breed, the farm location, and the feeding practices. A few butcher shops will co-operate.

I would agree with the above posts. There are differences, but within those general tendencies, so many other variables can come into play as to minimize or negate altogether the presumed tendencies of the two "terroir."

That said, let me put a plug in for Jamison Farms lamb. We used them exclusively, and it was outstanding.

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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And ...for the next 2 months you can get Icelandic lamb at Whole Foods...the only reason I go there

T

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Maxine

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Jamison Farm Lamb in Pennsylvania. The best I've ever had. Worth the price.

http://www.jamisonfarm.com/

That's two plugs for Jamison now. What I found remarkable was how reasonably priced they were. I bought their loin and shoulder, and, especially given their attention over the last several years, I would have expected higher prices. Great family outfit.

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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I have to say that ,IMO, domestic is generally superior in flavour and texture. I will also have to chime in supporting Jamison Farms. A friend lived close to their operation and I had several opportunities to try their stuff.

Tobin

It is all about respect; for the ingredient, for the process, for each other, for the profession.

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Most domestic lamb is finished on corn and has a higher fat content. Domestic lamb is graded Choice or Prime.

Lamb that i am familiar with from Australia or New Zealand is grass fed and is not as rich. Either is a good product but there is nothing like USDA Prime domestic lamb!-Dick

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Sublimating the thread into a "local Vs not local" avoids answering the question by using a political slant.

Correct answer is it depends on what cut of lamb and what the ultimate cooking method is.

The argument with vegetables and produce of local=better wears a bit thin when it comes to properly handled high quality meat. It also becomes an issue of personal taste.

New zealand and Aussie lamb legs seem to make better roasts, Aussie shanks have better flavor and yield for braising.

The issue of distance is irrelevant, it's proper storage.

Fresh australian lamb of exceptional quality is flown into this country weekly and it's quite possble to get these products from d'artagnan. The racks are fabulous.

The only really exceptional domestic lamb is that which you can trace back to a farm with it's own feed and ranching philosophy.

On that note, Jamison Farms Lamb is very good but it is *easily* blown away by summerfield farms lamb which may be just about the best domestic lamb in America.

http://www.summerfieldfarm.com/

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Local for me IS Australian lamb. Actually, it's running around in the paddock in front of my house. Far superior taste and quality compared to what's available even from our (very good) local butcher.

Now if some calves would just wander in our front gate ...

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I've always preferred American lamb vs. Australian. I find Ameriican lamb more mild, less pungent.

I don't cook much lamb but when I do I get it from a Halal butcher who tells me that it is locally raised baby lamb (raised by Amish).

Baby lamb adds a whole other dimension to the picture. It is very tender and mild.

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