• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Qui

Sturdy Orange Curd

10 posts in this topic

Looking for a tried and true orange curd that will be firm enough to use as a filling for wedding cake. The recipe that I currently have doesn't seem to hold up very well. Maybe I should add some sort to thickener. Gelatin? Cornstarch? Tapioca?

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Qui,

I use this recipe to glaze lemon mousse cakes, tarts etc. You might have to play with it for a filling but it does hold up well.

1 1/2 cup lemon curd - room temp

2 T lemon juice

1 sheet gelatin or 1 t gelatin

dissolve gelatin in lemon juice and add to curd.

pat

Looking for a tried and true orange curd that will be firm enough to use as a filling for wedding cake. The recipe that I currently have doesn't seem to hold up very well. Maybe I should add some sort to thickener. Gelatin? Cornstarch? Tapioca?

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i don't think i would ever risk using an unstabilized curd in a wedding cake either, unless it was just a smear on the layer for a flavor accent. you could try adding gelatine to your present recipe just don't over do it or use a cornstarch thickened recipe...which i thought i had...but can't seem to find :unsure: ...it must be at work. well, i'll post it tomorrow. fat lot a good that did ya... :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i don't think i would ever risk using an unstabilized curd in a wedding cake either, unless it was just a smear on the layer for a flavor accent.  you could try adding gelatine to your present recipe just don't over do it or use a cornstarch thickened recipe...which i thought i had...but can't seem to find :unsure: ...it must be at work. well, i'll post it tomorrow. fat lot a good that did ya...  :smile:

If you could share your recipe, that'd be great...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

try this recipe (Laurent Branlard):

270g .... Orange juice

30g ...... Lemon juice

150g .... Sugar

225g .... Butter

150g .... Sugar

40g ...... Corn starch

300g .... Whole eggs

120g .... Yolks

Boil juices, first amount of sugar and butter.

Combine second amount of sugar with remaining ingredients.

Temper these two mixes together and cook as for pastry cream.

good luck. if you're really picky you may need to adjust the sugar amounts depending of the sweetness of your oranges.

also sometimes i like to add a couple drops of orange oil after cooking if it needs a little boost.


Edited by avid (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you use ultra sperse(waxy maize thickner) it won't get watery like cornstach can. Or you can use both I love the stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you use ultra sperse(waxy maize thickner) it won't get watery like cornstach can.  Or you can use both I love the stuff.

where can I find ultra sperse? I will try it out... would you use it just like you would with constarch?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This doesn't address your original question, but I remember Bill Neal's suggestion (in "Biscuits, Spoonbread and Sweet Potato Pie") to use half lemon and half orange zest and juice in his orange curd recipe. He says that the addition of lemon adds a bright taste and avoids an overly 'cooked' flavor that can result from using all orange in curd recipes.

I've made his lemon curd recipe but haven't tried the orange variation yet myself.

I just noticed that avid's recipe has lemon juice added as well.


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you use ultra sperse(waxy maize thickner) it won't get watery like cornstach can.  Or you can use both I love the stuff.

where can I find ultra sperse? I will try it out... would you use it just like you would with constarch?

If cornstarch makes it watery, tapioca starch should not.


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you use ultra sperse(waxy maize thickner) it won't get watery like cornstach can.  Or you can use both I love the stuff.

where can I find ultra sperse? I will try it out... would you use it just like you would with constarch?

If cornstarch makes it watery, tapioca starch should not.

i've really not had a problem with water seperation even in freeze/thaw situations, at least nothing that would cause any alarm. just make it within a few days of your planned cake building and you should be ok. tapioca starch/waxy maize? keep things simple. the larger your mise en place/ pantry gets the more confusing, disorganized and expensive things get. streamlined and efficient makes a good pastry kitchen!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.