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Lemons and Limes: The Topic


amapola
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the heavy for its size test is pretty good, so i'll second that. but i find with limes, more so than with lemons, that if you give them a small squeeze, they should be a bit tender. the harder the lime, the drier the interior.

this is all cocktail research isn't it? :cool:

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it may seem obvious, but the rule of thumb i give my cooking students is that "heavy for its size is a good indicator of freshness."  produce is mostly water weight, and as the produce sits around, in the warehouse or on the shelf, moisture evaporates through the skin. we have a natural "scale" in our heads, that tells us how heavy that artichoke or lemon will feel when we pick it up. if it feels heavier than we expect, chances are good that it is fairly fresh. if it feels a lot lighter than expected, it has probably been sitting around too long.  that's my method, anyhoo...

It's called "density," of course, and I think you've articulated the concept extremely well.

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We have a "citrus" tree in our home but the fruit is very confusing - it starts off green, turns yellow then turns orange and the fruit is very bitter.  It is beautiful to look at and this year I invested in a Meyer lemon tree so hopefully my citrus woes will be over.

That's a really interesting tree you have. Do you know what kind of orange it is? For instance - is it a Seville (a.k.a. "bitter") orange?

Meyer lemons are great. If I ever get back to someplace that I can have a thriving tree outside, I hope to do a "fruit salad" tree like my dad did for his dad. He grafted several citrus onto the same tree, so that Papa had a tree with tangerines, lemons, grapefruit and oranges on it. He might even have had valencia and navel oranges together...I've forgotten for sure.

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  • 1 year later...

What's the neatest and cleanest way to wedge a lemon or lime and avoid as much of that white gunk that runs the length of the lemon? (Oh, and remove as many seed as possible so the kids aren't choking on them as well as the fish bones.)

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I always cut into wedges, chop off the center (white) part, and flick out the seeds with a knife or other utensil.

I do this with naval orange wedges too (not the seed part), as it makes the wedges easier to eat.

Edited by sanrensho (log)
Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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I've always just done it the same way I do for drinks, cut the knobs off of each end, cut in half lengthwise, then each half lengthwise into quarters. Most of the seeds fall out, that way, and the stubborn ones are easy to flick out with the knife tip.

For drinks, after I quarter the halves, I cut each wedge in half again, it makes a nice little piece. Perfect for Corona bottles.

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Your post got me wondering, so I went and experimented. The winner for me was first cutting the lemon in half lengthwise. Then slicing the first wedge avoiding the white center stingy thing. Then rotating and continuing to make wedges so I was left with a little core of the white thing and nice wedges that were "all lemon". Shockingly my test lemons had only one seed between them and that was flicked out as others have said with the knife tip. Do you have fresh lake fish on the menu? Hope to see the fish and lemon wedges on the dinner thread.

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The cooking school way is to trim off both ends first, then removing the peel and pith by making curved cuts along the lenght of the fruit. Then you take the cleaned fruit in the palm of one hand hand and make slices on both sides of each membrane with the other hand. That way you get nice clean citrus "supremes".

A really sharp filleting knife is a good tool.

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The cooking school way is to trim off both ends first, then removing the peel and pith by making curved cuts along the lenght of the fruit. Then you take the cleaned fruit in the palm of one hand hand and make slices on both sides of each membrane with the other hand. That way you get nice clean citrus "supremes".

A really sharp filleting knife is a good tool.

This is a great method for making supremes but I think when you want to serve a wedge of lemon as accompaniment for fish then that bit of peel is necessary to provide a "clean" hold and to act as a sort of press for the juice.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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I don't like seeds or white pith either. I leave the knobby ends on, as I find they give purchase to the wedges for squeezing. I cut them in half lengthwise, and then cut a triangular prism out of the lemon so to speak, removing the center rib of pith and most the the seeds from each half. If there are any seeds left they're usually pretty easy to scrape out. This is the best method i've come up with; if you make a clean cut with a sharp knife then you don't really use much lemon, and you end up with 8 seedlesss/pithless wedges.

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  • 6 years later...

Glorified Rice,

 

Thanks for the tip, and I'm sure many others who would desire seedless lemons will appreciate it too.

 

For myself, I find it not much trouble to flip the seeds out with the tip of my knife after cutting off the white pith from the center of the lemon at the thin edge of the wedge. You can hold it up to a light, conveniently right over my cutting board area, and the semi-translucent lemon will reveal every seed. I also dig out the seeds on a lemon half before juicing it. I'm always annoyed when restaurants don't do this and serve you lemon wedges with seeds. It seems to be pretty universal, all the way up to high end places I used to be able to afford to go.

 

In fact, the only attempt to deal with lemon seeds from a restaurant I've ever seen was at Jack Astor's with a seafood order, and they tied cheesecloth around half a lemon. Nice touch, but we never went back because of other issues not to do with the food.

 

It always worries me a bit when food scientists try to interfere with the very way that our food plants reproduce, so seeds are A-Okay with me, and I just deal with them. Life is persistent and prolific. I can't get over how many species we lose every year, and now they want to mess with our food plants.  :wacko:

 

That said, I do appreciate "seedless" watermelon (which contains both white and brown seeds, but fewer) and seedless grapes, but they also contain small edible white seeds usually.

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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Crepes?

To be totally transparent, I only bought these cause they were in a cute 4 pack and to be even more honest....lol...I didnt feel like walking clear across the produce section (40 feet) to get a mesh

bag of lemons...I didnt care that they were seedless.

 

:::Slinking away in lazy shame:::

  • Like 2

Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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Hello GlorifiedRice!

 

We were alerted to this post and would like to address it as as quickly as possible. As a representative of Frieda's Specialty Produce, I am sorry that you are disastified with our products. Seedless citrus is one unpredictable fruit. While they're bred to have no seeds, and most of them are indeed seedless, once in a while nature decides to play Russian roulette with seeds. A few fruits would end up with seeds in them.

 

While nature is unpredictable and beyond our control, we are reliable and have 100% satisfaction guarantee.  All we can do other than apologizing for your displeasure and inconvenience is provide you with a refund. Please email us at mail@friedas.com and we will make this right.

 

Once again, I'm very sorry.

 

- Oakley Boren

Communications Manager

Frieda's Specialty Produce

 

P.S. I'd like to add that 1) our production designer is doing a happy dance because you said his bag design is cute, and b) there is no shame in not crossing the aisle. Being 5 foot tall, I often give up on getting stuff from the top shelf.

Edited by FriedasProduce (log)
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Hello GlorifiedRice!

 

While nature is unpredictable and beyond our control, we are reliable and have 100% satisfaction guarantee.  All we can do other than apologizing for your displeasure and inconvenience is provide you with a refund. Please email us at mail@friedas.com and we will make this right.

 

Hi Freida's! I do NOT want a refund as I said I was not buying them cause they were seedless. However Id like you to consider carrying 2 items Thai WINGED BEANS and Organic In the pod Lotus Seeds.

 

Chino Farms in Cali sells Winged Beans, but I cannot contact them

Heres some info

http://slowfoodbali.com/slow-stories/wing-beans-the-one-stalk-supermarket/

 

Thats all I want, TY

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Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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Thanks again for letting us know about winged Beans and lotus seeds. I will forward the information to our team. No promises.

 

If you have further inquiries, please email me at mail@friedas.com. (I would also be happy to send you coupons and recipes if you'd like. Let me know!)

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  • 10 months later...

Does anyone know what type of lemon these are?

 

I picked them up in a local store this morning. Never seen them before. The Chinese name is 香水柠檬 which translates as 'perfume lemon". Mr. Google is of no help in any language. Thanks.

 

They are the length of regular lemons but narrower.

 

IMG_0094.jpg

Edited by liuzhou (log)

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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It looks very similar to an Assam lemon which originates from the Assam region of India. See if you can find it on Google. Have a look at http://citruspages.free.fr/lemons.html#longilimon

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35 minutes ago, pastryani said:

These look like finger limes.  If you google this you'll see pictures of the flesh inside which resembles caviar, and it's often used as a garnish.

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citrus_australasica

 

Thanks, but I'm sure that's not it. The inside looks like a lemon and nothing like caviar.  Caviar?

 

IMG_0104.jpg

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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