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maui420

Apple Cake

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Hello everyone,

Im looking for a good apple cake/bread recipe to make for my fiance(its her favorite cake). Its the kind that you can buy from 'farmers market'. Im not sure if its a bread or cake. It tastes like a cake and it comes in a small pan.

banana bread is more like a cake but it is labeled as a bread??? sorry if my post is confusing.

anyways, what's a good recipe? What kind of apples should I buy? etc...

Thanks for the help.

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I have a great recipe for apple crumb cake. I made it for my husband to take to work last week and now I have to make another one!! I'm not sure if it's exactly what you are describing as an apple cake, but it's real tasty. I used Cortland and McIntosh apples, but you could probably use whatever your favorite variety is. PM me if you'd like the recipe.

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On an aside, does anyone have a recipe for a Swedish-style apple cake (aka Scanian apple cake)? It has the slices of apple with batter poured over them, usually served with vanilla sauce.

Hmmm, maybe I should check out the Minnesota or Wisconsin boards :biggrin:

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You might PM eGullet member "Heyjude". She is a culinary historian and researcher, and has a recipe for a wonderful "Apple Cake". Her cake uses two varieties of apples, one for flavor and one for texture. It also calls for a small amount of Worchestershire. I have used it several times and it is always a hit. I must admit I use it more in the fall and early winter when really good apples are available. Perhaps we could entice her to post it here.

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This is an old family recipe for Apple Cake.

Fresh Apple Cake

2 C. Sugar

1-1/2 C. Cooking Oil

2 Well Beaten Eggs

2 Tsp. Vanilla

Juice of 1/2 Lemon

1 Tsp. Salt

3 C. Flour

1-1/4 Tsp. Baking Soda

2 C. Peeled Tart (granny smith) Chopped Apples

1 C. Chopped Dates

2 C. Chopped Pecans

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Grease and flour very large bundt or angel food cake pan. Combine sugar, oil, eggs, vanilla, lemon juice & salt in large mixer bowl. Beat well. Sift flour and soda. Add gradually to first mixture and beat well. Add Apples, Dates and Pecans. Batter will be very thick, so you will have to mix by hand. Bake for 1 to 1-1/2 hours depending on pan. Cake should be well browned and toothpick should come out reasonably clean. Best made a day or two ahead.

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I'll throw this one out there. I was toying with an apple pancake recipe, the kind that's as big as a plate with the apples all nicely caramelized into the batter. Anyway, the pancake would always lift really high, I'm talking a good two inches, then flatten as it cooled. So I was messing with the leavening to see if I could hold it, and in one failed experiement, I ended up with a damn good cake.

I've tweaked the method a bit as if it were baked in a cake pan, but mine was actually done in a big non-stick fry pan, so I don't know exactly how well this will release. It shouldn't be that much different than releasing sticky buns, so if you turn it over onto your plate before it cools, I'd think it would come out nicely.

Spiced Apple Snacking Cake

1 Granny Smith apple

2 tsp fresh lemon juice

2 large eggs

1 large egg white

3/4 cup heavy cream

1-1/4 cup all purpose flour

1 tsp baking soda

1 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp salt

1/3 cup sugar

1/4 cup dark brown sugar, packed

1-1/4 tsp cinnamon

1/4 tsp nutmeg

1/4 cup butter

Preheat oven to 425º. Peel, core and slice apples. Toss with lemon juice.

Heat skillet over medium heat. Add apples and butter and sauté until apples soften slightly, about 5 minutes. Pour into bottom of 9" round or square cake pan.

Combine dry ingredients in medium bowl. In another bowl, whisk milk and eggs to blend. Mix into dry ingredients. Pour over apples in cake pan. Do not stir.

Bake until toothpick inserted into center of cake comes out clean, about 20 minutes.

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I’d like to share my interpretation of Apple Crumb Kuchen – certainly a thoroughly valid example of a bread-cake hybrid. Long before the culinary use of baking powder or soda, bakers were mixing cakes from sweetened yeast-raised dough and topping them with fruit & sugar. The following recipe yields two kuchens – one for today and the other to reserve in the freezer.

Kuchens:

½ tsp granulated sugar

2 fl. oz. lukewarm water

1 Tbsp active dry yeast

8 ounces butter

¾ cup granulated sugar

3 large eggs

zest of small lemon

8 fl. oz. sour cream

¼ tsp salt

approx. 4 cups flour

1 quart peeled, cored & thinly sliced apples (I use Cortland or Northern Spy)

Crumble Topping:

1 cup flour

½ cup firmly packed light-brown sugar

2 tsp ground cinnamon

5½ ounces cold butter

Dissolve ½ tsp sugar in water; sprinkle yeast over; let stand 5 minutes, the stir briskly with fork.

Cream butter & sugar. Beat in eggs individually, then lemon zest. Stir in sour cream, yeast mixture, and salt. Gradually incorporate the flour to make a soft dough. Cover loosely with plastic wrap & slightly dampened tea towel; set in warm place to rise until doubled in volume.

Deflate dough; divide in half. Press evenly into 2 greased 13- x 9- inch cake pans. Cover pans loosely with plastic wrap and let rise until almost doubled.

Arrange apples in rows over surface of each kuchen. Sprinkle half of crumble topping over each kuchen and then distribute almonds on top. Let rise 15 minutes longer.

Bake in 375° oven for 15 minutes; reduce heat to 325° and bake for 20 to 30 minutes, or until crumble is browned and kuchen has separated from sides of pan.

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Mmmm....I made Swisskaese's Apple Cake recipe above, and what a great success it was! Oil cakes are always a practial choice in Japan (I never use soybean oil for cooking cakes though, think it's too gluey). I did cut the sugar down to 1.5 cups, and if you were generous with the dates, you might want to cut it a little further. I was fairly generous with the apple, and the fruit neither sank nor glued the cake up. The kids were after third helpings and were only put off by a promise of apple cake for breakfast :shock:

Thanks for the recipe!

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try googling "miss finney's apple cake" don't have the recipe right off, but my mom makes this one and it's killer.

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Mmmm....I made Swisskaese's Apple Cake recipe above, and what a great success it was! Oil cakes are always a practial choice in Japan (I never use soybean oil for cooking cakes though, think it's too gluey). I did cut the sugar down to 1.5 cups, and if you were generous with the dates, you might want to cut it a little further. I was fairly generous with the apple, and the fruit neither sank nor glued the cake up. The kids were after third helpings and were only put off by a promise of apple cake for breakfast  :shock:

Thanks for the recipe!

Hi Helen,

I am glad you enjoyed the cake. I haven't made the cake in a while and I will also reduce the amount of sugar, maybe even to 1 cup. I usually use corn or safflower oil.

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There was recently a NY Times recipe for an apple cake that looked very good. Its from Scott Carlsberg of Lampreia.

Also I have a good recipe for an apple pudding that gets a warm vanilla sauce poured over it. Very olde Americana.

I'd be happy to post either recipe.

Hal

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I got the following recipe from a work frien who brought it to all our pot lucks -- he said it was the only think he knew how to cook. The way it goes together is unusual. I call it Joe's Grannie's Cake.

Combine 2 cups flour, 1 tsp salt, 2 tsp baking soda, 2 tsp cinnamon

Slice enough apples to make 4 cups. Put in large bowl. Break 2 large eggs over apples. Stir to combine - then add 1/2 cup melted butter (marg) and

2 cups sugar. Stir to combine. Add 1 cup chopped nuts (your choice -pecans. walnuts, filberts) stir to combine. Fold in dry ingredients. It will be gluey.

Pour/scrape into greased 9x12 pan. Bake at 350 for 45 minutes or til done.

Produces a nice moist cake that keeps well. I use half brown sugar because I like the "caramel" flavor it produces.

Try it -- you'll like it.

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I made the walnut applesauce cake from Nick Malgieri's Perfect Cakes (at least I think that's where it's from) over the weekend. A lovely cake, with walnuts and raisins in it. I subbed out half the raisins for dried cranberries to add some color.

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i've been looking aroung the internet, and can't seem to find an apple cake recipe i like. i want one with jsut enough batter to hold the apple together. i'd like it to be very moist with not too many spices added, if any. you know, somethign i can eat with a mound of whipped cream. :biggrin:

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I still dream of an apple cake I had in Sherborne in 1997. Or was that Yeovil? Anyway, called a Devonshire Apple Cake, it was full of tart/sweet apples (big chunks, not small dice) of a perfect consistency (not underdone) and impossible to pick up and eat...cakelike, yes, but the moistness of the apples moistened the cake directly touching and made the whole thing more of an apples-barely-connected-with-cake sort of mass. Might've had a bit of a crumb topping as well. The perfect thing for drenching in pouring (or spooning!) cream.

If anyone has something of the sort, please advise!


Edited by kitwilliams (log)

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i've been looking aroung the internet, and can't seem to find an apple cake recipe i like. i want one with jsut enough batter to hold the apple together. i'd like it to be very moist with not too many spices added, if any. you know, somethign i can eat with a mound of whipped cream. :biggrin:

I have a very nice recipe for an apple cake that I've been baking for some 15 years now, always to a great success. It does use cinnamon though, but it would definitely be nice with a dollop of cream:) Here's a slice:

KANADA%20OUNAKOOK%20VALMIS%20L6IGE.jpg

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I don't have a recipe for apple cake, but I do have a tried-and-true one for a very easy apple quickbread, given to me many years ago by a Japanese friend. I don't know the recipe's original source.

Apple Bread

Makes 2 9 x 5" loaves

2 cups sifted flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1 cup vegetable oil

1 cup sugar

3 eggs, beaten

1 teaspoon vanilla

4 to 5 apples, peeled, cored, and cut in eighths

Preheat oven to 375F.

Sift together first 4 ingredients.

Combine oil and sugar. Mix in eggs.

Add to flour mixture, mixing well.

Add vanilla. Mix. Stir in apples.

Bake in 2 greased 9 x 5" loaf pans 50-60 minutes, until a cake tester comes out clean.

Let cool in pans 10 minutes before removing.

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This is more like an apple "brownie." It's baked in a cast-iron skillet lined with sliced apples, then flipped out of the pan bottom up. Of course, you can bake it in a baking pan too.

Apple Upside Down Cake

• 3 Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, quartered, and sliced ⅛ in thick

• 3 T sugar mixed with 1 tsp cinnamon

• 3/4 C sugar

• 2 eggs (or 1/2 C Egg Beaters)

• 1 tsp pure vanilla extract

• 1 C all purpose flour

• 1/4 t salt

• 1/2 t baking powder

• 1/2 t baking soda

• 1/2 C coarsely chopped toasted walnuts (optional)

• 3 T melted butter or 3 T unsweetened applesauce

Preheat oven to 375 F. Spray an 8” oven-proof skillet (I use cast-iron) with Pam and dust with about 1/3 of the cinnamon sugar mixture.

Toss sliced apples with salt and 2 tsp cinnamon sugar. Spread a layer of apples in tbe bottom of the prepared skillet.

Beat eggs, 3/4 C sugar, and vanilla until creamy; stir in applesauce or melted butter. Sift together flour, baking soda, and baking powder and fold into mixture. Fold in remaining apples and walnuts. Pour batter over apples in pan and dust top with remaining cinnamon sugar.

Bake 45 minutes. Let rest 5 minutes in skillet. Run a knife around the rim of the skillet and invert onto a plate. Serve warm (with ice cream).

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Well these are excellent apple muffins but definatley along the same lines of apples with just a bit of batter to surround the apples.


Edited by chantal (log)

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This one may not fit your request exactly, but it is a wonderful cake. It came from Cooking Light.

Cinnamon Apple Cake

It has a unique crunchy cinnamon sugar top crust. I make it often and everyone loves it. I'd call it somewhat of a coffeecake.

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