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Should I save skimmed fat from stock?


Kent Wang
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If I am making a chicken or beef stock, should I save the fat that I skim off the top after it's been refrigerated? Is this fat any different than if I were to take a big chunk of solid fat and render it on the stove?

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If I am making a chicken or beef stock, should I save the fat that I skim off the top after it's been refrigerated? Is this fat any different than if I were to take a big chunk of solid fat and render it on the stove?

bad idea.. just pitch it. its generally bitter and gross...

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Kent I do this all the time now with chicken and beef fat from stock. I do re render it to make sure all the water is out and I keep it in the fridge. The beef fat has been really good for roasting potatoes and making yorkshire puddings.

A discussion onbeef fat from stock

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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The fat usually captures a lot of the vegtable flavour and will stain red if you use tomato paste. If you want clean fat, I'm a big advocate of the 2 stage process:

Firstly, fill your pot full ENTIRELY of chicken bones and top up with water and simmer for 8 hours. Strain, skim off as much of the fat as you can be bothered. Then, add in your mirepoix herbs etc and simmer again for an hour, strain, defat, reduce down further if desired and then chill and portion.

Although more complicated, this has a few advantages. It allows you to make bigger batches of stock at a time in the same pot since you can cram more bones in there. The fat is clean and clear flavoured. The vegtables are only simmered for an hour so they don't get a leaden and overcooked flavour. And your reduce the stock at the same time as you simmer the vegtables so it saves you a bit of time there.

PS: I am a guy.

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