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eG Foodblog Tag Team IV: Marlene, Dave, snowangel - Cold Turkey, Three Ways


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My char sui is done. I think it could have benefited from a blast of heat, but I haven't tried it.

Breakfast/lunch today: Half a row of Saltines, each methodically buttered. Sick, isn't it?

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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On the other hand, I was on AIM last night with someone who wanted an egg roll seemigly as much as I wanted bacon. Now I want to invent a bacon and egg roll. Not the kind that cheats by using scrambled eggs, but something you could pull from the deep fryer, break open and have a lovely yolk come oozing out, surrounded, maybe, by strips of bacon. Call me crazy (pause). Any ideas on how to do this?

Where's Percy, of the infinite knowledge of and talent for eggs?

Maybe he's out back having a cigarette.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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Keep up the good work, guys! You are all awesome.... its a tough road to travel, but its worth it to be free!

When I was quitting, I allowed myself ANYTHING - food, drink, sex (alone if need be!) anything but a cig.

You are all incredible and brave.... don't stop!

"Anybody can make you enjoy the first bite of a dish, but only a real chef can make you enjoy the last.”

Francois Minot

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Velveting is the process of marinating any meat/seafood for stir-frying with a mixture of seasonings, oil and cornstarch.

What does the cornstarch have to do with this?

SB (at first glance thought you said "Velveeting"!) :laugh:

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Susan, I think that veg was bok choy.

Dave, I second (?third?). That glass is delectable. <the much-missed envy icon>

A friend of mine used this analogy to get thru quitting. He watched children learn to walk. They stood, they took a step, they fell. They did not then announce that it was too hard and they couldnt do it. Instead, they stood, and tried again. When he 'stumbled' by having a smoke, he reminded himself that he'd learned how to walk. It seems to me that things like the patch are like using the edge of the couch to help with balancing. Nothing wrong with a little help! Nicotine is such a small part of the damage cigarettes do to a body. I hope you will give yourself permission to do whatever it takes to keep quitting, for as long as it takes. Three cheers to everyone who is taking on the challenge!

And you guys are making all that good-looking food to boot!

Huzzah! Huzzah! Huzzah!

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Susan, I think that veg was bok choy.

Dave, I second (?third?). That glass is delectable. <the much-missed envy icon>

A friend of mine used this analogy to get thru quitting. He watched children learn to walk. They stood, they took a step, they fell. They did not then announce that it was too hard and they couldnt do it. Instead, they stood, and tried again. When he 'stumbled' by having a smoke, he reminded himself that he'd learned how to walk. It seems to me that things like the patch are like using the edge of the couch to help with balancing. Nothing wrong with a little help! Nicotine is such a small part of the damage cigarettes do to a body. I hope you will give yourself permission to do whatever it takes to keep quitting, for as long as it takes. Three cheers to everyone who is taking on the challenge!

And you guys are making all that good-looking food to boot!

Huzzah! Huzzah! Huzzah!

This is absolutely the best analogy of what we are trying to do that I've ever heard. And the one that puts it in the best context for me. I can relate to this.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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[...]I think the cooking thing is still viable, but those of you more familiar with the dish in particular or Cantonese cooking in general will know better. Scallops and snow peas:

gallery_6393_2478_27409.jpg

Looks good, Dave!

Lots of Cantonese food is actually "middle heat." If you look at some of hzrt8w's pictorials, you'll see that he will use a couple of hot peppers in a dish for moderate spiciness, rather than a layer of hot oil or a shitload of peppers like they often use in Sichuan or Hunan. In addition, many dishes have just a few slices of ginger, which is a lot milder than hot pepper. And there's also white pepper, as Dejah noted.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Bacon bits and croutons are done:

gallery_6080_2485_10545.jpg

gallery_6080_2485_13669.jpg

Those two large pieces you see on the side are for me to munch on. I like larger "bits" for the salad and I'll chop up some of the bacon a bit finer for baked potato topping. Salad dressing is next. Well after I have the nap that seems to have become my afternoon ritual!

In my new almost familiar funk state, we bought three porterhouses and three boneless rib eyes. Now I can't decide which ones to make. Maybe I'll let Don figure it out. :biggrin:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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We all just need to think of the money we will save, and be able to spend on food and drink.

Dave: Doesn't Jaz have very similar glasses?

Susan: Ingenious use of paper clips. Food safety wise I think you should be fine. Oh no, paperclips remind me of smoking. A good bet you can make with someone is that you can smoke a full cig. Without the ash falling once the trick is you push a paper clip or piece of wire through the cig the tar binds to it and keeps the ash on. Kind of like the Listerine apple juice bait and switch bet.

Well heading into the city soon, this will be hard; we can all do this together. Thanks everyone for the inspiration and support. Anyone else notice that they are eating a lot more food. I am afraid to stop eating (One of my triggers was the after meal cig.).

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What's in an Aviation Dave?  It looks good!  Oh and I really like the glass too.

Aviation

2 ounces gin

0.5 ounces Maraschino liqueur

0.5 ounces lemon juice

It's one of those classics that I'd never heard of it before jumping into the Cocktails forum. The garnish is two of these, a jar of which I got as a present.

The glasses are cool, aren't they? (thanks, btw) They're out of an impulse-buy travel kit, as is the pick. I'm not sure anything else in the kit is going to last -- we'll find out when I go to Tampa a little later in the blog -- but the glasses were worth the price of admission.

Hmmm, I think I might have all the ingredients for this. I'll check. Of course I don't have cool glasses like those. I want some. :angry:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I called my doctor today and we talked. She suggested the patch, an lo and behold, it is covered by my insurance company, so she called in a script. I went to pick it up, and apparently, she has to call the insurance company and they will pre-authorize it. What a bunch of malarkey, if you ask me. The pharmacist said it could take a couple of days. WTF?

Anyway, the pharmacy is in my grocery store, and I needed a few things, so, clutching my list, which I had written out in store order, I got absolutely everything on the list, plus a treat for me (Dr. Pepper; I hardly ever drink pop and we almost never have it in the house). For the first time this week, I did not walk into the house and immediately say "Oh, shit. I forgot..."

Oddly enough, I'm not eating constantly. I don't quite know what I want to eat.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Same here. I'm not eating any more than usual, except for the fact that I'm actually eating something in the morning now. Which today ended up being another half grapefruit. But you really didn't need to see another picture of grapefruit did you? :biggrin:

I have noticed how nice my car smells though since Don had it cleaned inside and out and it hasn't been smoked in since. Little bonuses.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Don't beat yourself up partner.  I did that yesterday and it just feeds the rationale to smoke more. The thing to remember is that you're not giving up.  We slipped. It happens.  .  We're human trying to do one of the hardest things known to man. 

Remember, it's not the perfection of your life, but the direction of your life that matters.

Russell J. Wong aka "rjwong"

Food and I, we go way back ...

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When I quit smoking, I discovered a treat that helped me through the worst of the cravings: Take a bite of the best dark chocolate truffle you can get you fat paws on and, while holding it in your mouth, take a sip of very rich, dark, French Roast coffee and let the chocolate drip slowly down your throat. Repeat as necessary! :biggrin:

It can be done!

Regards,

Kate

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Dave: Doesn't Jaz have very similar glasses?

gallery_6393_2478_5701.jpg

gallery_7258_2197_212.jpg

I got mine in a "drinks-to-go" kit too -- after-Christmas special. And there I was thinking I was unique.

By the way: Congratulations, all, for doing so well, and for doing this in public. How brave of you.

If you're looking for a salty, spicy, crunchy snack (sweet too, so it covers all the bases), you could try these Spicy Walnuts (Marlene and Dave, they're the ones I brought to the Pig Pickin).

Blanch 1 lb. walnut halves or pieces for a minute or so. (Marlene, a second opportunity to blanch!) Drain.

Mix 1/2 cup sugar with 1/2 to 1-1/2 tsp. cayenne. (I use 1 tsp, but if you want them milder or hotter, use however much you like)

Pour the sugar mixture over the walnuts, along with 3 Tbsp. vegetable oil. Mix well.

Pour out onto a sheet pan, attempting to get them into a single layer. Bake at 350 for a half hour or so, stirring every 10-15 minutes. You want them pretty dark brown -- sometimes this seems to happen in about 25 minutes, and sometimes it takes a lot longer.

Remove from the oven and salt heavily. I think because of the sugar, they take more salt than other nuts. Let cool. (They're okay when warm, but not great. They need to cool to crisp up.)

They keep well -- you can freeze them for months -- and they're great in salads, too.

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I had a little char sui snack!

gallery_6263_35_16081.jpg

This stuff is really, really good. It doesn't have the intense red ring that I see in restaurants, but who cares. It tasted wonderful. I think the cut of meat I used was more loin-like than butt-like, so next time I'll do it with butt.

I sampled a slice. Then another, and wanting that peppery kick, I added a bit of pickled jalapeno pepper. Nirvana! Slightly sweet. Slightly sour. With a kick.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Oddly enough, I'm not eating constantly.  I don't quite know what I want to eat.

Oh and I think I've solved the salty/crunchy something to do with your hand that you wish was a cigarette thing.  Pretzel sticks.

Every Friday, our company does something called "wind down," a ritual that, as far as I know, dates back to the early high-tech days of the late 70s and early 80s. Back then, it was beer and hot dogs. High-tech has matured, so these days it's soft drinks and . . . salty/crunchy things. Giant bowls of Tostitos, pretzels and potato chips. Chocolate cake, and cookies, too, but they didn't interest me. I ate my weight in starch and sodium.

Now I want a cigarette.

If you're looking for a salty, spicy, crunchy snack (sweet too, so it covers all the bases), you could try these Spicy Walnuts (Marlene and Dave, they're the ones I brought to the Pig Pickin).

Those were good. Are southerners allowed to substitute pecans?

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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Keep up the good work, guys!  You are all awesome.... its a tough road to travel, but its worth it to be free!

When I was quitting, I allowed myself ANYTHING - food, drink, sex (alone if need be!) anything but a cig. 

You are all incredible and brave.... don't stop!

Does anyone besides me remember a Dick Van Dyke movie from YEARS ago about a whole town that was challenged to quit smoking? If they suceeded they got like a million dollars from some corporate entity. I just remember that one of the "remedies" suggested was to make love whenever you wanted a cigarette, and I keep flashing on the scene of D.V.D. and (female lead) coming down the stairs (from what you're supposed to assume is the bedroom), getting half-way down, stopping, turning around, and heading back up again. I guess the idea of having a cigarette after sex doesn't work anymore. Cracks me up every time I think about it! :laugh:

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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I had a little char sui snack!

gallery_6263_35_16081.jpg

Oh my god. I don't know, maybe I have some kind of pork deficiency in my system causing latent cravings or something, but I think I'd rather have that for dinner tonight than just about anything I can think of.

"It is impossible not to love someone who makes toast for you."

-Nigel Slater

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Does anyone besides me remember a Dick Van Dyke movie from YEARS ago about a whole town that was challenged to quit smoking? If they suceeded they got like a million dollars from some corporate entity. I just remember that one of the "remedies" suggested was to make love whenever you wanted a cigarette, and I keep flashing on the scene of D.V.D. and (female lead) coming down the stairs (from what you're supposed to assume is the bedroom), getting half-way down, stopping, turning around, and heading back up again. I guess the idea of having a cigarette after sex doesn't work anymore. Cracks me up every time I think about it! :laugh:

Indeed I do remember that movie--ironically enough, it was called Cold Turkey, and not only did it star Dick Van Dyke, but it was directed and co-written by Norman Lear. Not what you'd call a sophisticated comedy, but I thought it was pretty damn funny. And I do remember that heading-back-up-the-stairs scene, plus several other running gags about the joys of substituting sex for cigarettes.

Meanwhile, being on something like day 10 of my new food regime, and having just provoked a king-hell joint-pain flareup by walking around Trader Joe's (no electric cart, plus unevenly slanted floors that are hell on my joints), I am *extremely* in touch with the concept of feeling way cranky about doing stuff that's healthy for me. And I can only reflect that this must be the same crankiness that I've postponed all these years from when I quit smoking but redoubled my eating--knew I got off that evil weed a little too easily! :laugh:

Anyway, long story short is that I sympathize, no, commiserate with all you recent tobacco quitters, urge you not to beat up on yourselves for how hard it's being, and further urge you to do whatever is necessary to make this change as easy as possible on yourselves. As the instructor for my healthy-eating course said to us all--and I do think it transposes nicely to smoking--you've had years of practice to learn and reinforce this behavior, so of course it's going to take awhile to retrain all those habits.

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That little slice of char sui, with the pickled pepper on it... that is so beautiful. What a photo... And damn its making my mouth water!

Which TJ's do you use, mizducky? Hillcrest, La Jolla Village Square, or Pacific Beach (Garnet Ave)? LJVS store is in a pretty new bldg, might have friendlier floors.

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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