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PBS show sparks interest in central coast


andiesenji
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Huell Howser on PBS (KCET in L.A.) did a one hour show on Paso Robles and the surrounding area, which has already sparked interest in the central coast as a vacation/weekend destination, according to several people I spoke to earlier this morning in the hospital cafeteria.

His first visit to a restaurant was for breakfast at Hoover's Beef Palace in Templeton, just south of Paso Robles.

He also visited one of the family farms open to visitors, Jack Creek Farms and posted the web site for local agricultural businesses - a map can be ordered that shows the various places that encourage and welcome visitors.

Central Coast Ag business

Later he visited Pipestone winery and intimated that he was planning on doing further visiting on his own time.

Much of the show was spent in Paso Robles itself, noting the history of the hotel, the hot springs around which it was built and the renewal of the town following the 2003 earthquake.

Apparently quite a few people tuned in to the show last evening because when I mentioned it, several in the group responded that they found it very interesting and really hadn't considered it as a destination. Like most people, they have driven through the area but rarely did anything but stop briefly.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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The first thing that popped into my mind was: How many different pronunciations of "Paso Robles" did you hear?!

I contend that the correct pronunciation, the "local" pronunciation, is Pass-uh Roh-bulls. My wife insists that it can only be pronounced in over-emphasized newscaster Spanish...

So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

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At first, the title of this thread had me scared. Paso is one of my favorite spots, and as an occasional visitor with no financial interest in the place, I hope that it does not get too napafied in the near future. I can still remember 20 years ago when Paso was a pretty simple cowtown with no restaurants of note and fewer wineries with tasting rooms than I have fingers.

Now Paso is (imho) just right. A person can stay there for 4 or 5 days, have a different good meal each evening, taste at different wineries each day, and still find a cheap motel for maybe $30 a night. And still feel like there is more to see.

It is also amazing to see how the variety and especially the quality of the local wines have improved.

But as I said earlier, I worry that once vast quantities of folks find out about the area, the prices of everything will go up, there will be lines at the wineries, and Hwy 46 will look like a two lane version of the 405 in LA at rush hour.

Thank God they filmed “Sideways” elsewhere. :rolleyes:

One point . . . was his ability to recollect the good dinners which it had made no small portion of the happiness of his life to eat.

--Nathaniel Hawthorne "The Custom House"

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Pas Robles (roe-bulls to the non-hispanic locals) has always been a hidden treasure. We go there for the wine and food, but only as a gateway to Cambria usually. Paso Robles is the best place to access the coast highway northbound to drive the Big Sur coast. Once on highway 1, not much great food until Big Sur itself (Ventana Inn, Post Ranch Inn). A nice lunch and spectacular view is to be had at Cafe Kevah at Nepenthe.

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The friends I have in the area usually refer to it as "Paso" which Huell remarked on in the show.

My friends live in Arroyo Grande, Nipomo, Atascadero, Salinas and Hollister and we get together in Cambria or Paso Robles as that is not too long a drive for any of them. For me, however, it is a long, long trek so since I moved to Lancaster in '88, we only make it every couple of years.

Since I don't drink, I have always been the designated driver for visits to the local wineries. At our last visit, we stayed at Creekside Inn in Cambria because they accept pets. I don't think anyplace we visited was more than 45-50 minutes away.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Here is the link to the Paso Robles Winery Association webpage. Besides lots of info on the wineries there is supplemental information on dining and accomodations.

I've been to visit Paso wineries a few times but spent the most time there last summer. Many great wineries and we also found some good food. There is a Paso Robles restaurant thread already, I believe. I'm looking forward to getting down there again this year.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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