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The one time I tried to make a Pink Gin I used five "goodly" dashes, and found the result not to my liking in the least. So I'm wondering if I would like a more modest dashing (or even dropping--Wondrich suggests three drops!), or maybe the Pink Gin is just not for me. (For the record I quite like Angostura-heavy drinks in the sour & tiki & flip directions.)

Edited by Craig E (log)
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Oddly enough, I don't think I've ever tried it with just a small amount of bitters!  I suppose I should.  Ted Haigh's recipe was the first time I encountered the drink, so I went ahead and made it that way, and liked it.  It's not something I make very often, though.  I had it in a restaurant once by requesting "Gin & Bitters," and even though I had no idea how much bitters was used, it tasted fine. I imagine the bartender raised an eyebrow upon receiving the order!  Three drops, however, sounds rather minimal.  I might have to do some experimenting . . .

Mike

"The mixing of whiskey, bitters, and sugar represents a turning point, as decisive for American drinking habits as the discovery of three-point perspective was for Renaissance painting." -- William Grimes

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I'm not a regular gin drinker, but apparently an artisanal gin from my neck of the woods has been making quite a splash.

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/fils-du-roy-gin-award-1.3514793

 

I suppose I should pick up a bottle and try it. 

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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