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Cardamom


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When making ganache, I always do cold infusions in the cream for a 24 hour period. Add your crushed cardamom to the cream, stir and put in the fridge. Stir periodically. You can even go longer. I find it gives a great flavour this way. Strain before continuing with your recipe. I also don't think you're using enough cardamom (1 tsp. for 2 cups). I would double that amount.

Good luck!

Edited by mostlylana (log)
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I've made cardamom ice cream and got a subtle but definite flavor by steeping 8-10 pods in 2 cups of hot cream for 15 minutes or so.

OK - I've gotten the subtle cardamom flavor with the fresh spice from Penzey's last night. Customer wants a bold flavor. Thoughts?

How about sprinkling some powdered cardamom on the ice cream before serving or on the crème brûlée before adding the sugar and caramelizing it?

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OK - I've gotten the subtle cardamom flavor with the fresh spice from Penzey's last night. Customer wants a bold flavor. Thoughts?

"Bold" cardamom can be pretty difficult if it is to remain pleasant. Strong camphorous notes come through very easily. I'd even consider using a lightly infused cream with large fragments of seed through the ice-cream to give the bold moments.

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This thread is confusing me. I use 2 tsp powder for a 2 quart batch of ice cream, I don't know if the flavor is 'bold' exactly, but unmistakeably there, and I love cardamom so it is not a flavor I am shy with. If I'm mixing powdered spices into a custard of any sort, I mix them into the eggs & sugar, otherwise they seem to just float on top of the cream. My experience with whole seeds and pods is that it takes way more volume of seeds/pods to get the same flavor. I don't know much about it but aren't there green, black, and white cardamoms? I've seen the staff use big black pods in Indian curries. We get whole pods of green by the kg and I grind and sift it, which is so tedious but the smell is worth it. Maybe one is milder and that is what the OP is using?

Edited by pastrygirl (log)
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I've made cardamom ice cream and got a subtle but definite flavor by steeping 8-10 pods in 2 cups of hot cream for 15 minutes or so.

OK - I've gotten the subtle cardamom flavor with the fresh spice from Penzey's last night. Customer wants a bold flavor. Thoughts?

How about sprinkling some powdered cardamom on the...crème brûlée before adding the sugar and caramelizing it?

I agree with this last suggestion. Go ahead and infuse your cream with it, but adding it on top might give it a stronger presence if that's what the customer wants.

I wonder, though, how it would survive the torching. I suppose with enough sugar it would be enough of a barrier to prevent or lessen any burning of the spice.

Or perhaps caramelize the sugar first and then do a light dusting with the spice?

 

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i make a cardamon bavarian to go in a dessert we labeled "Mango Chai-Tini"

I used 5 grams of toasted cardamon pods then put them in a spice grinder. Put in my milk brought to a boil and infused overnite-Strain before using. The flavor is great

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Thanks for the feedback, everyone!

Last night I used a combination of ground spice and whole pods -

I ground the pods up and infused them in the cream for 30 minutes.

Before I rewarmed the cream I added ground cardamom to the infusion.

I noticed that when I strained the mixture that a good bit of the ground spice

was in the botom of my chinois....

I tasted one today and was pleased with the increased flavor. Still not enough for

my customer (who was smoking a hookah the last time I brought samples for him to try....), but I now know that I'm going to have to use more spice and infuse for a longer time.

I'm thinking that an overnight infusion is probably the way to go.

Beaches Pastry

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I've made cardamom ice cream and got a subtle but definite flavor by steeping 8-10 pods in 2 cups of hot cream for 15 minutes or so.

OK - I've gotten the subtle cardamom flavor with the fresh spice from Penzey's last night. Customer wants a bold flavor. Thoughts?

How about sprinkling some powdered cardamom on the...crème brûlée before adding the sugar and caramelizing it?

I agree with this last suggestion. Go ahead and infuse your cream with it, but adding it on top might give it a stronger presence if that's what the customer wants.

I wonder, though, how it would survive the torching. I suppose with enough sugar it would be enough of a barrier to prevent or lessen any burning of the spice.

Or perhaps caramelize the sugar first and then do a light dusting with the spice?

Has anyone added spices to the sugar that's caramelized on top of the custard?

Would it taste burnt or boost the flavor?

Beaches Pastry

May your celebrations be sweet!

Beaches Pastry Blog

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How about sprinkling some powdered cardamom on the...crème brûlée before adding the sugar and caramelizing it?

I agree with this last suggestion. Go ahead and infuse your cream with it, but adding it on top might give it a stronger presence if that's what the customer wants.

I wonder, though, how it would survive the torching. I suppose with enough sugar it would be enough of a barrier to prevent or lessen any burning of the spice.

Or perhaps caramelize the sugar first and then do a light dusting with the spice?

Has anyone added spices to the sugar that's caramelized on top of the custard?

Would it taste burnt or boost the flavor?

No, but I've made Indian nut brittles (chikki) and added cardamom powder at the end of the cooking before the caramel sets - I guess you could do this for crème brûlée too - but you've got to work quickly before the caramel sets.

Maybe a small spray of cardamom oil would help intensify flavour - I just wonder if your customer may just go from not enough to too much flavour :rolleyes: Good luck!

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  • 5 months later...

I've made cardamom ice cream and got a subtle but definite flavor by steeping 8-10 pods in 2 cups of hot cream for 15 minutes or so.

I know it's going back a bit, but I would like to know what ice cream recipe you used, please. :smile:

also from Kerry Beal

How about using some cardamon essential oil?

Where would one get cardamom essential oil, please. Thanks. :smile:

I am on a cardamom kick, so to speak. :wub:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

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[

also from Kerry Beal

How about using some cardamon essential oil?

Where would one get cardamom essential oil, please. Thanks. :smile:

I am on a cardamom kick, so to speak. :wub:

Ask your pharmacist to order it from Xenex.

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Lorann makes one.

You are perfectly correct that LorAnn makes a cardamom, but unfortunately it is not available in Canada. A tad expensive to get from the States. I'll find a company in Canada soon enough, but thanks for all the help.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I've made cardamom ice cream and got a subtle but definite flavor by steeping 8-10 pods in 2 cups of hot cream for 15 minutes or so.

I know it's going back a bit, but I would like to know what ice cream recipe you used, please. :smile:

I just adapted a recipe for vanilla ice cream, and I don't remember exactly what recipe I used. I think it was all cream (no milk), but other than that, I don't know. Sorry!

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I made an absurdly rich custard with distinct cardamom flavor

using 1 c cream to 3 cardamom pods, peeled cardamom seeds from pods, discarded pods and crushed seeds.

Infused cream with crushed seeds over low heat. Strained out seeds. I infused for at least 20 min.

cardamom custard

you could try a higher ratio.

If your customer wants 'in your face' flavor, how about dusting the brulee w cardamom just before serving?

Or putting some on the plate so the smell is very present?

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Made some cardamom ice cream reported on the Philadelphia ice cream list. It was only slightly 'cardamomy' in my opinion. A dozen different recipes called for a dozen differenct amounts of cardamom. A fellow eGulleter suggested sprinkling powdered cardamom directly on my bowl of ice cream and I did. Yummm... :wub: Quite a lot of cardamom, in fact.

Interesting because one recipe I looked at said that a little cardamom goes a very long way and that if you used too much, the result would be a 'soapy' taste. I never hit soapy. And I never hit too much for me.

Would some folks have a higher tolerance or need for cardamom than others? My DH certainly needed no more cardamom for his taste, and he is the one who usually uses more soy sauce, more salt, more vinegar, more jerk seasoning, etc.

Curious. :hmmm:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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  • 2 years later...

On a whim, I bought some black cardamom pods yesterday. Should have smelled them first:-) Is there any application for the seeds in a ganache? I am getting smoke and menthol--doesn't seem like a good idea.

Ruth Kendrick

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I've only used black cardamom in savory foods. Perhaps one of the bacon/chocolate combos might be enhanced with it.

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  • 3 years later...

Interesting issue...cardamom.  I am a cardamom nut and always put twice as much as called for in anything desserty I make.  And have never tasted anything resembling turpentine.  And it's all pre-ground.    I have always kept two kinds of cardamom.  One I label 'dessert' and the other one 'food'.  Are there two kinds of cardamom...or did I make this up? 

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Interesting issue...cardamom.  I am a cardamom nut and always put twice as much as called for in anything desserty I make.  And have never tasted anything resembling turpentine.  And it's all pre-ground.    I have always kept two kinds of cardamom.  One I label 'dessert' and the other one 'food'.  Are there two kinds of cardamom...or did I make this up?

There are indeed two different kinds of cardamom - green cardamom and black cardamom and they are very different. However, I have never seen nor heard of preground black cardamom. It is usually added whole to dishes and fished out either before service or by the diner. I am not sure why you have two different versions as they are not interchangeable. If you have the opportunity to buy green cardamom in its shell and grind the tiny black seeds yourself you will be amazed at how different it is from the preground stuff. Nevertheless I do not like it in sweet goods!

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