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Glassware


pariah_kerry
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I would define Spiegelau as not expensive as compared to Riedel. Especially if you can pick them up on sale. A set of 6 Burgandy glasses for $44.95 (Spiegelau) vs $94.95 for 6 of the Riedel. I enjoy drinking and tasting wine, though drinking out of the expensive glasses is nice and "makes you feel good", I think you can get the same enjoyment out of the lower costing glass.

Spiegelau is a real bargain right now on Amazon; $30 for a set of six. And I managed to get 11 for the same price, and hurrah for Amazon. Here's how: One of the six glasses was broken on arrival. I contacted Amazon through their "returns" page and immediately they sent a complete replacement set of six, no charge and by Federal Express (the original set was shipped standard UPS, at my choice). They gave me a return sticker to send back the broken glass, which I did -- but I doubt they much cared, as the replacement set went out way before I sent back the broken one. I suppose Amazon insures itself well, or else it would be going broke shipping glassware in individual UPS boxes. What are others' experiences?

In abdomen veritas

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In the Riedel Vinum line, I'm a big fan of the Chianti/Zinfandel glasses. In my limited experience, these are the most versatile glasses that Riedel offers -- they improve the taste of just about any red wine. I have those and the Bordeaux glasses. We also have a set of the Sauvignon Blanc glasses because that's just about all my wife drinks.

We've tried the Spiegelaus and are just not impressed. Here's the review.

Chad

Yeah, those chianti/zin glasses are my faves, too. In fact, I'm using one right now! As advertised by Riedel, they also work great for riesling (and some other fruity whites). Since these three varietals are what I drink most often, these are my most used wine glasses. And I've found they stand up to the dishwasher quite well (maybe 30 washings so far without any clouding).

In abdomen veritas

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Yeah, but what type? Bordeaux, zinfandel? Which one for white? Do you get the impression I'm clueless?

I'd recommend buying the Riedel chianti/zin/riesling glasses as a good start on "special" wine glasses. These little guys aren't cheap, but they are versatile (they work well with most popular red and white wines, with the exception of chardonnay, for which they are a bit of a dud). They are also relatively small (many of the special wine glasses are enormous, with long, easily breakable stems). As I note in another post, I've found the Riedels are dishwasher friendly (not only based on wear, but also because they are short enough to fit in there). You should also think about a set of cheaper Bordeaux glasses, maybe in the 14 oz. size; the Cost Plus glasses are good, or if Amazon is still having its special, try the Spiegelau. "Bordeaux" glasses aren't just for Bordeaux wines; when people refer to "all purpose" red wine glasses, this is more or less what they mean. Although nobody puts 14 oz. of wine in their glass at once (O.K., not most people), the extra room lets you swirl the stuff around, which releases aromas and more importantly makes you look good in front of your guests (obssessive-compulsive wine swirling is also valuable therapy if you have lots of nervous energy in your hands).

In abdomen veritas

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I have found that good wine glasses, once you start, is an addiction, just like getting tattoos. You just can't have one. Or was that potato chips?

We recently built an addition on our home that included not only an expanded cellar, but a glassware storage area to accomodate sevearal hundred glasses. Which is funny, because I can't remember ever having more than 8 or 10 people over at once.

Reidel makes 5 or six different series now, and the "wine" and "restaurant" series are quite affordable. The "sommelier" series are absolutely gorgeous, and impractical. ( some are around $50 each) but sooo cool to break out ( no pun intended ) with wine geek friends. The most important thing to remember with good glasses, is when polishing, never hold the base of the stem while twisting. The stem will not withstand the torque.

I am fortunate enough to have met and dined with Georg Reidel a number of times, and believe me, the glass matters.

Note to Craig- Direct is now the sole Reidel distributor.

wine is proof that god loves us and wants us to be happy
Ted Cizma

www.cheftedcizma.com

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The most important thing to remember with good glasses, is when polishing, never hold the base of the stem while twisting. The stem will not withstand the torque.

Ahh yes, I understand this completely, but I have to be missing something ehre, if you can't hold the stem, and are trying to polish the bowl, you have to hold the bowl right? So how can you hold it and polish it without leaving finger smudges where you are holding it? Sounds like a formidable Catch-22 to me.

Please point out what I am missing, I would love to know...

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The most important thing to remember with good glasses, is when polishing, never hold the base of the stem while twisting. The stem will not withstand the torque.

Ahh yes, I understand this completely, but I have to be missing something ehre, if you can't hold the stem, and are trying to polish the bowl, you have to hold the bowl right? So how can you hold it and polish it without leaving finger smudges where you are holding it? Sounds like a formidable Catch-22 to me.

Please point out what I am missing, I would love to know...

You use two cloths to polish the glass with. One to cup the outside of the bowl and polish that side, one inside the glass to polish the inside.

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Assuming you've just done all your other dishes, your hands will be essentially free of skin oils, and won't smudge the glasses anyway. Yes, the same effect that gives you dishpan hands also helps your Riedels to remain unsmudged.

Walt

Walt Nissen -- Livermore, CA
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The most important thing to remember with good glasses, is when polishing, never hold the base of the stem while twisting. The stem will not withstand the torque.

Ahh yes, I understand this completely, but I have to be missing something ehre, if you can't hold the stem, and are trying to polish the bowl, you have to hold the bowl right? So how can you hold it and polish it without leaving finger smudges where you are holding it? Sounds like a formidable Catch-22 to me.

Please point out what I am missing, I would love to know...

You polish with a good cloth - and the cloth is that which is touching the glass, not your fingers.

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I have been reading about all these wonderful wine glasses, and even got to hold some of the Riedel Sommelier glasses while browsing in Fortnum and Mason, which are too precious for someone like me, who breaks a lot of glasses. So when I saw that Trader Joe's now carries Riedel "Degustazione" line(488 series)(a machine made, lead free Tyrolean crystal)

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Speaking of Reidel, and shameless self promotion. I'm offering holiday baskets with a pair of Reidel "Vinum" glasses as well as two Laguiole knives and bunch of other cool foodie stuff in them on my website with guaranteed December 25th delivery. Cheap, too.

wine is proof that god loves us and wants us to be happy
Ted Cizma

www.cheftedcizma.com

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Another wonderful Glass manufacturer is Bormioli Rocco from Italy. They have many different lines, but the "Premium" are particularly good. You can find them for about $7- a stem.

bormioli rocco premium

They are strong enough to put in the dishwasher, but if you have the patience it is better to wash your wine glasses with Baking soda. Then you will have no soap residue, and smell wine and not detergent.

They also have a great decanters.

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  • 5 months later...

I need to register for glassware and am having a hard time deciding what I want.

I am still a novice on what glasses work best with each wine, but I am learning.

I know I want good quality glasses, but not overly expensive ones. I have a small NYC apartment, so I need to limit the number of different types of glasses.

So if you had to chose 3 essential types of glasses which would they be, and what manufacturer would you recommend? Thanks all.

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If you can separate the wheat from the chaff (and I contributed to the latter) in this thread, you may find an answer to your question. But I don't know if Riedel stems are stocked at many places that have bridal registries.

We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

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Riedel Glasses without a doubt. We registered for ours, depending on the style you want Williams Sonoma carries them, as does Amazon.com! If you are just starting a set I would go with 6 chardonay glasses and 6 cab glasses. From there you can start adding...champagne, reisling, pinot noir, cognac, etc, etc.

Check out their site:

http://www.riedelcrystal.com/index.htm

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http://www.riedelcrystal.com/index.htm

Riedel is the best glassware IMO and is carried by Williams Sonoma and even Amazon.com. We obtained ours thru our bridal registry also. Start with a few pieces -champagne, chardonay and cab glasses. Then you can add on!

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If you are just starting a set I would go with 6 chardonay glasses and 6 cab glasses.

I agree with these - if you want a 3rd type, I suggest a port glass. That size/shape works well for just about any dessert wine, and liqueurs too. Or maybe a champagne flute. OK, maybe you need 4 types....

I know a man who gave up smoking, drinking, sex, and rich food. He was healthy right up to the day he killed himself. - Johnny Carson
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I can safely recommend against the Steinglau that shows up really cheap at Amazon on periodic promos. I bought a set of six Bordeaux glasses and also six of the Burgundy back at Christmas season. The price was unbeatable: under $25 for 12 glasses including free shipping. I like the shape and feel of them and I don't even drink wine but have a new hosue and figured I'd want them for company. I've used a few of them (generally just two at a time) for other bevergaes but they're just way too fragile. I try to be very catious and have still broken three of them already, even with limited use. At roughly $2 per glass I'm not losing sleep over it but in the big scheme of thigns it was not a good investment, even at such a low price.

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For one all purpose wine glass I sould suggest the Chianti glass from the Reidel Vinum series. You could then expand into the Burgundy, Claret and Champagne glasses

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