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maryland crab

Santa Fe Restaurant recs

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Tommy: Having just returned to Northern New Jersey from a wonderful stay in Sante Fe, I would offer a few suggestions.

We stayed at The Inn of the Five Graces in Sante Fe. It is billed as a meeting of the Orient and the Old West. The room was a bit quirky, but extremely charming. It included a nicely stocked refrigerator with a pitcher of margaritas upon arrival plus cheeses, pate, salty snacks, waters, ice tea, etc. In the morning they served a decent enough breakfast and wine and cheese at around 5:30pm. The only complaint was the roaring air conditioner in the bedroom. Perhaps it would be cool enough in October to skip it. http://www.fivegraces.com

It's right around the corner from Pink Adobe, which has been suggested here and two blocks from the town square.

I mentioned in an earlier topic that I was disappointed with the fine dining scene. The chefs took almost no inspiration from the local cuisine. We have access to exceptional fine dining at home, and there didn't seem to be any need to seek it out in New Mexico.

I agree with Robin about Geronimo. We did not feel graciously welcomed and we dropped about $700 for four. My personal regret was not going to Ristra. Someone had recommended it - French with Southwestern influence. I also regretted missing Maria's.

In addition to this most recent trip, we had been there about 15 years ago. For that visit, we ate a Coyote Cafe when it was fairly new. We also went to Pink Adobe and a few other places that I can't remember. It was all wonderful.

Stick with the restaurants serving Southwestern fare and your dining experience will be memorable.

Enjoy! Marie


NJDuchess

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Jaymes is so right about La Fonda - even if you don't stay there, try to have breakfast in their dining room or a drink in the lobby bar just to soak up the atmosphere (as long as you don't have to pass up breakfast at any of the places previously mentioned to do so).

njduchess, based on our one experience there I wouldn't have too many regrets about missing Ristra - we found Tulips to be much more satisfying in a similar stylistic vein.

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There was one thing that I forgot to mention about the trip - food-wise. I found a stand at the Tusuque where a Middle-Eastern gentleman/chef was selling spices. Although I heard of Zatar, I never had it. His suggestion was to mix it with olive oil and salt, then drizzle it over tomatoes and feta. We have enjoyed this salad many nights with dinner. He also had his own "chef's blend" that I have been rubbing on all types of meat and poultry. Excellent!

Someone local might have another suggestion for this, but we headed back to The Chile Shop in town to purchase chile powder. Fifteen years ago, they introduced us to Dixon. It was a staple in my kitchen for really great and flavorful chili, mail ordering it when we ran out. Any others worth trying?


NJDuchess

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Fall is the best time of year in Santa Fe; trees will be turning colors middle of October and pretty much finished by Halloween.

The very severe lack of water this year might make all of that happen slightly earlier however. Generally speaking gardeners say to expect the first frost/overnight dip-below-32 degrees to occur any time after October 15th just as the last possible freeze date in spring is May 15th.

Fall is indeed when the smell of pinon burning in fireplaces is in the air at night.

Couple of restaurant comments... think I might be the poster who previously mentioned Ristra as being quite good; still is. They have added a very casual, drop-in space to their bar area with an extensive menu of "small plates" should you tire of reservation-type dining each night. Full dinner menu is also available too if you suddenly want more or simply prefer the less formal environment. It is a very welcoming restuarant that is a personal favorite though I will readily concede that Geronimo is probably the finest kitchen in town. One must be a bit prepared/not surprised by a degree of haughtiness or pretense at Geronimo; something I find, frankly, at many highly regarded restaurants in cities everywhere.

And, about the Tesuque Village Market... business is in the process of being sold as I write so little can be said about what it might be like next fall. Right now it is great for a New Mexican breakfast, a terrific Club Sandwich (with roasted green chile slices) or a 1/2 pound hamburger; extremely good pastries in the morning, too. I'm about three miles further up the road in Tesuque; the Market is where I buy the New York Times every morning.

Finally, if indeed Southwestern flavors in your meals is important, then DO be sure to eat at Coyote Cafe, Mark Miller's place where he caught the food world's attention with his take on southwest flavors. And, have a very retro meal at the Pink Adobe; have the Steak Dunnigan. Call your cardiologist and tell him to go ahead and order that new boat then enjoy a New York Strip Steak grilled and smothered with a concoction of mushrooms sauteed in butter and roasted green chiles. It is hardly the most "culinary" meal you'll ever eat but you won't forget it.


Edited by fyfas (log)

Bob Sherwood

____________

“When the wolf is at the door, one should invite him in and have him for dinner.”

- M.F.K. Fisher

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I have noticed that in the many mentions of places to go in Santa Fe, few mention The Ore House. I don't hink I have eaten more than appetizers there but the view of the Plaza and one (or more) of their margaritas is worth the visit.

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Lots of excellent suggestions already on this thread! It's great to have an updated and vibrant thread on Santa Fe. (And yes, the search function on the top of page is definately the way to go. Between the "advanced" search features and also all the specific delimiters available--poster, sub-forum, thread or topic, title or not--you really can find even very specific information.)

I have noticed that in the many mentions of places to go in Santa Fe, few mention The Ore House. I don't hink I have eaten more than appetizers there but the view of the Plaza and one (or more) of their margaritas is worth the visit.

It's great to sit on the balcony at the Ore House sipping a margarita and looking over the Plaza.

Another nice place for daytime drinks is the rooftop bar at La Fonda. (I also agree with others recs regarding a stay at La Fonda. I recently also had a very good lunch in the beautiful restaurant at La Fonda.

I've been in some of the newer hotels (eg. Inn at Lorretto) which are great but I love the older rooms at La Fonda. The atmosphere is just great; I think it is now my favorite hotel to stay at in Santa Fe for both its ambience and location. La Fonda also has a newer section of more luxurious rooms which I've heard good things about from a friend but I've enjoyed the more "standard" rooms which have New Mexico//Spanish wooden furniture and beautiful tiled bathrooms. There are also lots of interesting B&B options in Santa Fe. One we've stayed at few times is Inn on the Paseo which is only a few blocks from the Plaza and which has free parking for guests. http://www.innonthepaseo.com/ (The B&B's fill up pretty quickly, especially the ones within walking distance of the Plaza so if your're interested you need to book well in advance; doubly so if it's during any event like the Santa Fe Wine and Chile Festival).

Other nice places for drinks are the bar and attached rooms in the 19th century Staab House at La Posada (a luxury inn complex a few blocks from the Plaza.) Some nice places for a glass of wine with interesting winelists are the gorgeous courtyard at La Casa Sena (good wine shop next door) and either inside or out on the porch at El Farol on Canyon road. We recently spent a nice afternoon drinking P ortuguese and Spanish wines at El Farol along with some good hot and cold tapas. Nice fireplace and quiet lounge/bar area at the Inn at the Loretto. The Dragon Room at the Pink Adobe is fun place. We really like the bar at the old Palace which is now attached to the newer restaurant Senor Lucky. They have redone the bar to update it in some ways but the room still has some of the great 19th century bordello atmosphere.

For me too, one of my favorite things about Santa Fe are the breakfasts. It is a great breakfast town—Tia Sophia’s, Café Pasqual, Harry’s Roadhouse, and The French Pastry Shop on San Francisco St outside Hotel La Fonda.. Café Pasqual and Harry’s Roadhouse are great other times of the day as well.

Bobcat Bite south of town a bit is a great classic place for green chile cheeseburgers. It’s in a neat small old building out in the middle of nowhere. Make sure you get a good green chile cheeseburger sometime during your stay; it is a classic and excellent combination. There are some other well known burger joints with green chile cheeseburgers right in Santa Fe but I haven't tried them out yet. Another place for casual food like chicken fried steak and bbq is The Cowgirl Hall of Fame. It’s nice to sit outside; relaxed funky atmosphere and clientale. They have a Sunday brunch with live music outside.

Il Vicino (on San Francisco St., I think) has very good pizza. It is a small local chain which started in Albuquerque. Nice thin crust, wood fired oven, good toppings. Standout salads as well. (Note, I've only been to Abq locations.)

Classic NM food at La Choza (sister restaurant of The Shed which is off the Plaza..). We usually go to La Choza which is more frequented by locals and has good hot and flavorful red and green chile but I've had a nice lunch at The Shed as well which is right off the Plaza. I like Tomasita’s too; I always make sure to get a bowl of posole and some natillas for dessert. (Somehow it seems like I eat more traditional NM food down in Albuquerque…)

We had a very good meal and accompanying service at Geronimo's. The service is more formal than at some Santa Fe places but I did not find it offputting or very different from many restaurants with a similar level of food in San Francisco. We also got some excellent wine recommendations from the sommelier.

Check out the Farmer's Market if it still open when you're there. It's a very nice one and is a short walk from the Guadalupe District.

Glad to hear the props for Ristra. I've been wanting to try it out. I haven't been to Coyote Cafe in a number of years but I want to go back again. For higher end food, I think they are still the restaurant in town that incorporates SW influences to the largest extent.

Does anyone have comments on The Old House restaurant at the El Dorado Hotel? I've heard good things about it from other sources but have not seen many comments on eGullet yet.

Also, the opening comments on Senor Lucky (same owners as Geronimos) were not too propitious; has anyone been there recently?


Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Here are the dinner menus at:

Senor Lucky

click

The Old House as the El Dorado Hotel

click

We've look in at the dining room of Fuego at La Posada and it is very pretty. Here is there dinner menu:

click

So, as mentioned, I've not been to any of these places but am interested in comments if others have experiences to share. The Old House looks to have a special focus on seasonal ingredients.

Looking over these menus reminded me that Santa Fe is a good place for game meats--elk, venison, buffalo and quail are often to be found on menus here.


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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We were at The Old House a few months ago - they had just gone through a chef change (their former chef moved to Anasazi) and were definitely not firing on all cylinders. Three out of four courses had fairly serious execution flaws, to the point where they ended up comping a significant portion of our meal.

Having said that, I'd be interested in some current reports on Anasazi. I wasn't thrilled with my previous visit, but it seems like there has been a significant talent upgrade in the kitchen. Any recent experiences?

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We were at The Old House a few months ago - they had just gone through a chef change (their former chef moved to Anasazi) and were definitely not firing on all cylinders.  Three out of four courses had fairly serious execution flaws, to the point where they ended up comping a significant portion of our meal.

Having said that, I'd be interested in some current reports on Anasazi.  I wasn't thrilled with my previous visit, but it seems like there has been a significant talent upgrade in the kitchen.  Any recent experiences?

Good information; thank you for posting it. I think the kudos I had been hearing for "The Old House" were due mainly to their former chef, Martin Rios. This information does make the Inn of the Anasazi restaurant newly interesting as well. From what I just googled it sounds like he moved last fall sometime. I haven't been able to find any new reviews online of the Inn of the Anasazi.

Hopefully the glitches you experienced at The Old House will be ironed out after the new chef is there awhile. The menu looks interesting.


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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the Santa Fe Wine and Chile Festival).

interest: piqued.

what's the story with this thing? from what i see on the instranet, it's more of an organized and formal thing requiring advance tickets and consisting of sit-down classes and seminars, rather than a walk-around madhouse kinda thing that you can just take in at your leisure like i'm used to. am i wrong?

thanks for the suggestions everyone. there's nothing wrong with a fresh thread. that's for sure.


Edited by tommy (log)

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the Santa Fe Wine and Chile Festival).

interest: piqued.

what's the story with this thing? from what i see on the instranet, it's more of an organized and formal thing requiring advance tickets and consisting of sit-down classes and seminars, rather than a walk-around madhouse kinda thing that you can just take in at your leisure like i'm used to. am i wrong?

thanks for the suggestions everyone. there's nothing wrong with a fresh thread. that's for sure.

Hopefully Robin will have something to say about her experiences. I haven't been there for the festival, but I think it is more of an organized series of events. Wine tastings and also restaurants featuring a particular winery and wines; sometimes the winemaker will speak. I haven't heard about the event Robin mentioned at the Opera House; sounds intriguing. (The Opera House is gorgeous, but I've 'only' been there for operas.)


Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Concerning the Santa Fe Wine and Chile Festival...

As one can see from their website, it is a several day affair held in several locations throughout Santa Fe. If one is a serious wino/wine geek several of the seminars are very interesting each year. Too, there are a few "Guest Chef" meals - usually lunches - done with local chefs. Not inexpensive, these too are often very good provided one has a real interest in a particular chef. And, every restaurant in town hosts different wineries on different nights with menus that match wines. Some are in private rooms with lots of discussion while others are passive with a winery person simply available for conversation about the wines.

The highlight of the week is the Grand Tasting held in a tent at the Santa Fe Opera site just north of town. Excellent assortment of wineries pouring with food stations representing many of the best restaurant in Santa Fe.

Couple of things to keep in mind...

1. Grand Tasting sells out every year and fairly early; mid-July usually.

2. Parking at the site is restricted to those who have purchased a site parking pass ($10 extra I think). Without this pass one MUST take a shuttle bus from town which can be a dicey proposition given traffic trying to get into the site (vendors/wineries/pourers etc.)

3. While the sides of the tent are typically open and there is air circulation, it can be very warm on a Santa Fe September Saturday. Consuming too much wine - not using the spit buckets - on this kind of day at 7400 feet altitude can be, well, problematic.

4. If one is driving, consider a designated driver. There are about four police juristictions nearby including a couple of Native American tribal ones. One does not want to be stopped.

All of that said, it is a GREAT event and can easily be a fabulous "themed" trip to Santa Fe.


Bob Sherwood

____________

“When the wolf is at the door, one should invite him in and have him for dinner.”

- M.F.K. Fisher

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We've been to the Wine & Chile Fiesta at least half a dozen times. Unlike some similar events (e.g. the Aspen Food & Wine Classic), it is completely a la carte - tickets for each event are sold individually, so you can do as much or as little as you want.

Comments from fyfas on the grand tasting are spot on - it's a must-do, but purchase tickets early, get the parking pass, and don't plan on dinner that night.

The out-of-town excursions can be fun - we've been to the Chimayo and Rancho de Los Golondrinas events, both of which were like high school field trips with really nice food and wine lunches tacked on. Tour guides in both cases were very good. Even though I don't care for the restaurant in general, the kickoff luncheon at Coyote Cafe has been a pretty reliable success.

I'm a card carrying wine geek but the wine seminars to me are less interesting and generally poor values - we will usually pass on those unless something really catches our fancy. As mentioned earlier, wine dinners vary greatly - we had a spectacular Veuve Clicqout dinner in a private room at the Compound last year, but other dinners we've attended have been much more casual. If you find a winery/restaurant pairing that interests you it's probably worth trying at least one.

For us the Fiesta ends up being more of a backdrop for our visit than the focal point - the flexible schedule gives you plenty of time to get out of town or get some other non-food & wine related things done.

Hope this helps!

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We were there last September and it was wonderful. Stayed at the El Dorado -- good location (4-5 blocks off the plaza), very nice rooms and amenities. Also, it's an Amex Platinum property, so if you happen to have the card, make sure to ask for a room upgrade. We didn't eat at the Old House, but the menu looked very interesting. Did have desserts and listened to some good local music in the El Dorado.

For dining, Tomasita's was very good for "true" New Mexican food -- when they say spicy they mean it. The Shed was a great New Mexican lunch. For our "fine dining" meal, we went to Geronimo and definitely enjoyed it. It wasn't a 5 star meal -- but was very good with creative use of local flavors/ingredients. It definitely was more of the high end "art scene" dining then the rest of our time in Santa Fe.

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shamelessly bumping.

any more thoughts on a NY'er's trip to Sante Fe and Taos? i got the lodging all sorted, now i'm just worried about eats and what to see. and yes, i've been reading this board for ideas.

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shamelessly bumping.

any more thoughts on a NY'er's trip to Sante Fe and Taos?  i got the lodging all sorted, now i'm just worried about eats and what to see.  and yes, i've been reading this board for ideas.

Tommy,

Only thing I'll say is, simply, get on the plane and get here. It is - as of today - a spectacular fall. Temperatures in the high 60's, low 70's. Trees are changing colors now (early); clear blue skies with loads of puffy clouds daily. True Georgia O'Keeffe type experience.

As to food, ask any questions; answers/opinions will follow. This is a small place. Everythiing is within 20 minutes. Restaurant/meal choices are plentiful with very few that are to be avoided (and, no I do NOT work for any Chamber of Commerce; I am an ex-New Yorker if that counts for anything).

Taos is slightly more than an hour away; further north. It's very nice but considerably smaller than Santa Fe but still has several interesting places to eat.


Bob Sherwood

____________

“When the wolf is at the door, one should invite him in and have him for dinner.”

- M.F.K. Fisher

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We have enjoyed staying at the Water Street Inn which is a short walk from the Plaza. While they serve a very nice breakfast at the Inn, we must always stop at Tia Sohia's and the Plaza at least once. Lunch a must at The Shed. We're not in to fine dining so dinner at Tomasita's is our speed though our SF friend always takes us to El Nido in Tesuque. Last trip we went to Chimayo and enjoyed lunch on the patio at Rancho de Chimayo after a visit to the Santuario, it's a good place to see old New Mexico.

http://www.waterstreetinn.com/

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Tommy,

Only thing I'll say is, simply, get on the plane and get here.  It is - as of today - a spectacular fall.  Temperatures in the high 60's, low 70's.  Trees are changing colors now (early);  clear blue skies with loads of puffy clouds daily.  True Georgia O'Keeffe type experience.

say-uhhh, how long do y'all think it's going to remain nice like that? the jet isn't fueled up quite yet. :sad:

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say-uhhh, how long do y'all think it's going to remain nice like that?  the jet isn't fueled up quite yet.  :sad:

C'Mon ! Get the pilot off the golf course, hit Katz Deli for some sandwiches and tell the driver to get on to Teterboro ! You'll be here in time for dinner...

Anyway, it's still nice today but the news/weather geniuses are talking about some possible rain and cooler early next week. That will accelerate things a bit.

Rule of thumb in northern New Mexico is for the first freeze around October 15th. Overnight the last of the wildflowers, chamisa etc are brown and gone. Aspens on my land are bright yellow with one starting to go to brown. Hope that gives you some idea.

We had a very wet summer which made everyone very happy. Talk is for a wet winter too with a returning El Nino in the Pacific; will mean good skiing.


Bob Sherwood

____________

“When the wolf is at the door, one should invite him in and have him for dinner.”

- M.F.K. Fisher

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C'Mon !  Get the pilot off the golf course, hit Katz Deli for some sandwiches and tell the driver to get on to Teterboro !  You'll be here in time for dinner...

yeahbit he wants to stop at Rutt's Hut, and it's throwing off the whole schedule.

here are some ideas that we're going to look into. i welcome any pooh-poohing or encouragement.

the wakening museum

cosmonut.org

sante fe school of cooking for something/anything

sante fe brewing tour/tasting

swaia

coyote cafe

cafe pasqual's

inn at anasazi

drinks at that nice hotel right there with the nice view whose name escapes me

georgia o'keeffe museum

bobcat bite for a burger

in taos:

Appletree

does anything there particularly suck?

also, we're planning on coming home with some art for decorating and gifts and whatnot. anything/where in particular we should roam (i know, art is like food and subjective, but you get the idea)?

we're definitely not looking for fine dining. get enough of that at home. i want to taste something that recently walked on or grew from the soil near santa fe. or at least that's what i want to be led to believe that i'm tasting.


Edited by tommy (log)

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A coworker raved about the Bishop's Lodge brunch. Is he onto something or nuts? (He's very fond of buffet brunches).

I enjoyed my meal (and those served to my 3 companions) at Jacquelina's in Taos.

1541 Paseo Del Pueblo Sur

Taos, NM 87571


"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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O.K... only because you asked.

I know nothing about the Cosmonut Museum or the Wakening Museum except that Wakening is down the street from the O'Keeffe. I know what SWAIA is as an organization but am a loss as to what they are doing - actively - now that Indian Market is over. There is a Museum of Indian Art in a cluster of Museums run by the state near St. John's College. There is another just off the Plaza (also small) that might be run by SWAIA. That museum has an on-going museum of contemporary work I like by Bob Hazhous, son of the famous Native American sculptor Allan Houser. There is also The Wheelright Museum with Native American art in the aforementioned cluster.

The O'Keeffe is a personal favorite mostly because I'm partial to her art, her "take" on the southwest landscape and the endless sky. It is a small museum, easily seen in an hour or slightly more. In addition to three room of pieces from the permanent collection the just opened show is Paul Strand,Southwest. Strand was a noted American photographer, represented by O'Keeffe's husband Alfred Stieglitz. He spent three consecutive summers in Santa Fe and Taos (1930, 31 and 32) with O'Keeffe as guests of Mabel Dodge Luhan. D. H/ Lawrence was another guest. The Strand exhibit (which is small) has been in Cincinnati and will travel to Seattle/Tacoma.

Snata Fe Brewing is a good local brew. They've moved into a new facility on the southside of town with a food operation that serves breakfast, lunch and dinner. Cannot specifically comment other than that they do serve the to-be-expected pub type food. Know nothing of their tours.

Santa Fe School of Cooking is fun for either half-day or full day classes; southwestern dishes and non-participatory cooking classes. If you are a very serious cook you might find it not challenging enough.

As to other restaurants...

- Bobcat Bite: a MUST for the ten ounce green chile cheeseburger (note closed Sunday, Monday and Tuesday; cash only/no alcohol when open).

- Cafe Pasquals: Another must. Breakfast or lunch and expect to wait some. Dinner is fancier, more ambitious cooking and very good (pricey) if not the very best in town.

- Inn of the Anasazi: right off the Plaza; probably the best hotel in town (a Rosewood Hotels property). The restaurant is now run by Martin Rios who previously was the "star" at The Old House in the Eldorado Hotel. Up there with the 3/4/5 best in town for most interesting food and priciest menus.

- Coyote Cafe: now nearly 20 years old; where chef Mark Miller kicked off the idea of southwestern tastes as cuisine. Expensive and very good in my opinion. Others will disagree. Oddly the locals have, long since satisfying their curiousity, left it to visitors and tourists and remained "loyal" to other restaurants. Go figure. While I don't eat there every night I DO go and have not had a bad experience; since they opened. They also operate a rooftop Cantina off the main restaurant that is excellent for a lunch or late afternoon snack/drinks.

What sucks ?

You asked, just my opinion... The Appletree in Taos. Location and setting is fine; food is ordinary and service is poor.

In Taos I'd rather go to Doc Martin's in The Taos Inn a block away or to Joseph'sTable (lunch or dinner) in the La Fonda Hotel on Taos Plaza. If you still want New Mexican food, Orlando's a mile north of town is a MUST. Small and popular. Cash only; beer and wine available.


Bob Sherwood

____________

“When the wolf is at the door, one should invite him in and have him for dinner.”

- M.F.K. Fisher

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I agree with fyfas re: The Appletree in Taos. We ate there awhile back but have been much more happy at Doc Martin's re: both the food-menu and execution- and the atmosphere.

The other dining options you mentioned in Santa Fe look nice. I would also recommend going to one real New Mexican restaurant while you're there, especially if it's your first trip to New Mexico. Three options are: La Choza, Tomasita's or The Shed. Another option to fit in a New Mexican meal would be to have breakfast at Tia Sophia's, right off the Plaza.

Besides the area surrounding the Plaza and Canyon Road, I'd recommend the short walk to the Guadeloupe/Railroad District. There are nice galleries, shops and some food options there too. (Tomasita's is there) The farmer's market is there on Saturday mornings as well. It's wonderful to see the abundance of chiles and other food. I would highly recommend looking inside St. Francis Cathedral; it is a particularly lovely church.

You may not have time for any museums beyond the Georgis O'Keefe museum, but the "Museum Hill" complex a little south of downtown is very interesting. The setting alone is nice because you get beautfiul vistas of the surrounding countryside that aren't available from downtown. I think there are buses that can take you there. Here is a link to the complex: Museum Hill So far, I've been to the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. If you are interested in art and other crafts by contemporary Indian-Americans you may want to check out the musuem that faces St. Francis Cathedral. (fyfas also mentioned this in his previous post.)

Up in Taos, I'd recommend stopping at the San Francisco de Asis church in Rancho de Taos, just south of downtown. It is a quintessential example of New Mexico adobe architecture. I also really like the Millicent Rogers museum in Taos. The musuem is the old adobe hacienda this former NYC sociallite lived in during the first half of the 20th century and it houses an incredible collections of vintage Indian rugs, pottery and silver/turquoise jewelry. You can visit the museum over the course of an hour or two.

Also, I guess the bar you mentioned was the rootop cantina at La Fonda hotel. I'm not sure how late in the season they keep it open but you can always check with the front desk.


Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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There is a new, hidden treasure in Santa Fe, (for lighter fare, and pastries etc.) that even locals might not know about. It's called Tree House Pastry Shop and Cafe and it's located down a garden path at Plants of the Southwest (a native plant nursery) on 3095 Auga Fria. Sit outside and enjoy our incredible crisp fall weather.

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i just want to thank everybody for all of the suggestions. i was planning on getting together full reports for my blog and here, but that hasn't yet happened. so you'll just have to live with "thanks" for now. :smile:

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