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Jason Perlow

Build your own Temperature-Controlled Fridge

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http://www.lemis.com/grog/brewing/temperature-control.html

Got an old computer lying around that isn't useful for anything? Well, download a copy of FreeBSD or Linux (Free, Open Source operating systems similar to UNIX) follow this guy's instructions and buy the kit components, and you too can be home brewing like a complete geek.

The software was developed by a British chemical engineer. He's also got some cool recipes for homebrews:

http://www.lemis.com/grog/brewing/index.html


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Wow... that's right up there with some of the Biochem PhD's I work with who boiled their wort in autoclaves...


I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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That's kind of cool.

[geek]

I haven't done much work with it, but you could probably tap the I2C line off a memory module, and use LM_Sensors to control the fridge the way you would any heat-producing (or reducing) piece of computer equpiment.

[/geek]

Could run this off the same machine you're using to run your Linux Robotic Wet Bar (will edit with link)


Matt Robinson

Prep for dinner service, prep for life! A Blog

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Wow... that's right up there with some of the Biochem PhD's I work with who boiled their wort in autoclaves...

Hey.. at least you know your wort is free of any microbes if you do it in the autoclave!

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I'm not sure this is the right thread on which to ask this question nor am I sure if the question has been asked before. But, here goes.

How should one age beers? Seeing as there's often no cork to deal with, does orientation matter? It seems that capped bottles would be better stored vertically than horizontally. Should corked bottled be stored horizontally? Does anyone have general guidelines for years to age? Of course, I imagine that keeping them away from light is a good idea. It doesn't seem, however, that temperature is as important since the number of years the bottles will be aged is considerably less than one may age wine.

I recently purchased a couple expensive four packs - Goose Island's Bourbon County Stout, Dogfish Heads's Burton's Baton Ale and Olde School, and North Coast's Old Stock - and I'd like to lay down a couple of bottles for years to come to see how they mellow. This got me thinking about laying down come other barley wines and barrel aged beers.

Thanks for any advice.

Sincerely,

rien

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How should one age beers? Seeing as there's often no cork to deal with, does orientation matter? It seems that capped bottles would be better stored vertically than horizontally. Should corked bottled be stored horizontally? Does anyone have general guidelines for years to age? Of course, I imagine that keeping them away from light is a good idea. It doesn't seem, however, that temperature is as important since the number of years the bottles will be aged is considerably less than one may age wine.

I don't know the technical aspects of it, but here's what I do - I store beers upright in bottles, using CO2 absorbing caps (which may not be an option with purchased beers), in cases (therefore in the dark), in the basement (mid-60s temp) next to the wine. Flavors definitely mellow and smooth out - I've noticed it especially with fruit or spiced beers, which seem to lose a lot of the fruit or spice flavor - but I've got some over 10 years old that are still very tasty, just in a different way. My best guess is you should start sampling your high-gravity beers after 18 months - two years and see what's happening, but more age won't necessarily hurt. Some of my ciders and meads are just coming into their own now after 8 or 9 years.

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Rien-

In regards to storing corked bottles of beer:

In my experience they are always stored vertically, and I can think of a few reasons why, but I checked around and these guys have provided a more thorough answer than I ever could (see link).

Storing Beer

Cheers!


aka Michael

Chi mangia bene, vive bene!

"...And bring us the finest food you've got, stuffed with the second finest."

"Excellent, sir. Lobster stuffed with tacos."

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