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eG Foodblog: Marlene Maple Leaves, Bacon & Pecans - A Canadian go


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Uh, does your kid ever eat any vegetables?

What's a vegetable?

Actually tomorrow features asparagus, Sat, squash and Sunday carrots. K? :biggrin:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Dean is sound asleep in North Carolina, and so by the time he reads this it will be too late for him to object to this obvious, but ultimately important, bit of grandstanding.

While Dave and I certainly admire and appreciate our Canadian friends attempts at prper frying methods for the noble bird, we feel that there must be more of an even playing field comparison between deep frying and pan frying. Therefore, I am happy to announce......

The First Annual Pig Picking Fried Chicken Throwdown!

This no holds barred, cage (it is in fact, going to be inside of a cage-if you count a fence on the tennis court) match will take place sometime on Saturday during Varmint's World Famous Pig Pickin. Dave and I will square off on opposite sides of the net and fry chicken until the best man is left standing. He has agreed to this, in the true spirit of manliness and competition, and the wagering can begin as soon as the oddsmakers do the analysis and set the pre fry odds. A team of semi sober and semi honest judges will be appointed and their decision will be final, well, maybe final. Any disagreements will be settled by some kind of entertaining and eccentric contest.

May the best fryer win.

Good luck, Dave. You'll need it. :raz::raz:

.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Lid. Cookie sheet. Half sheet pan. Bottom of a bigger skillet. Lids are easy. Hell, a hunk of sheet metal from our garage would work. A piece of glass. Whatever.

OK. So, you've inspired me to take on the chicken challenge. I don't have a deep fryer, nor do I intend to get one (I don't have enough outlets unless I cut into the walls). Assume I can just use a nice, heavy bottomed stock pot and a Taylor candy thermometer? (No high tech stuff that requires batteries here.)

Can't wait for your "eating cold fried chicken over the kitchen sink tomorrow" report, Marlene. Get the boys into this and their opinions, too, please.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Dean is sound asleep in North Carolina, and so by the time he reads this it will be too late for him to object to this obvious, but ultimately important, bit of grandstanding.

While Dave and I certainly admire and appreciate our Canadian friends attempts at prper frying methods for the noble bird, we feel that there must be more of an even playing field comparison between deep frying and pan frying. Therefore, I am happy to announce......

The First Annual Pig Picking Fried Chicken Throwdown!

This no holds barred, cage (it is in fact, going to be inside of a cage-if you count a fence on the tennis court) match will take place sometime on Saturday during Varmint's World Famous Pig Pickin.  Dave and I will square off on opposite sides of the net and fry chicken until the best man is left standing. He has agreed to this, in the true spirit of manliness and competition, and the wagering can begin as soon as the oddsmakers do the analysis and set the pre fry odds. A team of semi sober and semi honest judges will be appointed and their decision will be final, well, maybe final. Any disagreements will be settled by some kind of entertaining and eccentric contest.

May the best fryer win.

Good luck, Dave. You'll need it. :raz:  :raz:

Whoa. wait a minute. I did what you guys said to do. I get to be a judge for this.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Let's get ready to rumble!!!!!

The use of the expression "fried chicken throwdown" has already been used by another worthy food-based organization, so I politely request something a bit more novel and creative for this competition.

And I'm pretty good at getting grease off the tennis court!

Dean McCord

VarmintBites

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Marlene, your turtle cheesecake looks divine! :rolleyes::wub:

What time are you serving? :wink:

Chicky looks good too. (Both of them, guys. Down, down! :raz:)

Some French toast this morning, Marlene? With plenty of that good maple syrup . . .

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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Thank you Marlene for being braver than most of us and trying out not one but two methods for fried chicken, at the same time, no less! I could never have been that organized. I'll put this new knowledge to use and cook up a batch of fried chicken during the Christmas period and yes, I will do it both ways, but not at the same time. However, I'll be using snowangel's method, as I don't have an electric deep fryer. And that gravy is a must.

Now, for breakfast: cold fried chicken eaten while standing over the sink...why not? :laugh:

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Let's get ready to rumble!!!!!

The use of the expression "fried chicken throwdown" has already been used by another worthy food-based organization, so I politely request something a bit more novel and creative for this competition.

I suppose Fry off has been used too? Ok, ok, it's not very novel!

Marlene, your turtle cheesecake looks divine! :rolleyes::wub:

What time are you serving? :wink:

Chicky looks good too.  (Both of them, guys. Down, down! :raz:)

Some French toast this morning, Marlene? With plenty of that good maple syrup . . .

Thanks Judith! Chicky was very good indeed, both of them!

There will be French Toast this morning. And bacon. We had snow all day and night yesterday and now it's freezing rain. There is more snow yet in the forecast. It's very pretty outside. Nothing is moving, and it's so very white everywhere. Don (wisely) has decided to work from home. The boys are still asleep, and I'm working on my coffee.

I may have Ryan's friend here until tomorrow if the roads don't clear. Hopefully I'll have enough ingredients on hand for the things I want to make today, since I won't be venturing outside in that mess! I used a lot more pecans than I thought for the cheesecake yesterday. I'll have to check my supply or pecan pie may have to wait until tomorrow.

Cornbread today in preparation for stuffing on Sat. I might make some spiced tortilla chips as Don really really likes them. On the menu tonight is Tonkatsu and fried rice (no veggies although I might throw together a salad :raz: ). Lunch will of course, be cold fried chicken. :biggrin:

I'm working on nibbles for Sunday's dinner. I've got bleu cheese popovers in mind, some fresh shrimp, but I'm open to ideas for one or two other things. Preferably things I could make in advance.

Good morning everyone!

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Lid.  Cookie sheet.  Half sheet pan.  Bottom of a bigger skillet.  Lids are easy.  Hell, a hunk of sheet metal from our garage would work.  A piece of glass.  Whatever. 

OK.  So, you've inspired me to take on the chicken challenge.  I don't have a deep fryer, nor do I intend to get one (I don't have enough outlets unless I cut into the walls).  Assume I can just use a nice, heavy bottomed stock pot and a Taylor candy thermometer?  (No high tech stuff that requires batteries here.)

Can't wait for your "eating cold fried chicken over the kitchen sink tomorrow" report, Marlene.  Get the boys into this and their opinions, too, please.

Why not? Although the cast iron skillet worked extremely well. I also want to mention that the Waring Pro deep fryer I have is excellent. The recovery time between batches of chicken was literally seconds.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Breakfast is done, pics will follow later. Time to get the cornbread going, and pound the pork for the tonkatsu and maybe I'll make some honey garlic meatballs for appetizers on Sunday.

Don has promised to go shopping for me later, because I will need more pecans before I can attempt the pie. I know how thrilled he is about this pie. :raz:

The boys have gone out side to throw snow at each other, and in theory they'll shovel off the walkway for me while they're at it!

They are extremely irritated that it would be a snow day if they were in school. They feel slightly ripped off :biggrin:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Marlene, it sounds like you've gotten over your fear of deep frying pretty well. But if you still have doubts, read the first chapter of Russ Parson's How To Read a French Fry. His explanation will turn you into a fry-fanatic in no time.

Edited by bloviatrix (log)

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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The boys have gone out side to throw snow at each other, and in theory they'll shovel off the walkway for me while they're at it!

They are extremely irritated that it would be a snow day if they were in school.  They feel slightly ripped off :biggrin:

Snickering from the West Coast while I get ready for a quick round of golf :biggrin:

I don't know what your kids are complaining about ... they apparently don't have to eat veggies :raz:

Really enjoying this Marlene. Taking notes for a Souther-Style Pig-Thing I'm planning for this summer. I'm helping Varmint with his kitchen ... he's helping me with the BBQ. This eGullet trade-off thing seems to work well for us Canucks eh??

A.

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Marlene, it sounds like you've gotten over your fear of deep frying pretty well.  But if you still have doubts, read the first chapter of Russ Parson's How To Read a French Fry.  His explanation will turn you into a fry-fanatic in no time.

Yay! Another cookbook to buy!

The boys have gone out side to throw snow at each other, and in theory they'll shovel off the walkway for me while they're at it!

They are extremely irritated that it would be a snow day if they were in school.  They feel slightly ripped off :biggrin:

Snickering from the West Coast while I get ready for a quick round of golf :biggrin:

I don't know what your kids are complaining about ... they apparently don't have to eat veggies :raz:

Really enjoying this Marlene. Taking notes for a Souther-Style Pig-Thing I'm planning for this summer. I'm helping Varmint with his kitchen ... he's helping me with the BBQ. This eGullet trade-off thing seems to work well for us Canucks eh??

A.

I so want to be golfing right now. :sad: The cross border trade offs work very well. How come you're not helping me with my kitchen?!

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I so want to be golfing right now.  :sad:  The cross border trade offs work very well.  How come you're not helping me with my kitchen?!

I dunno ... what do you have to trade? Not an NHL season, I know that for sure! 2 more days until the World Juniors start!!! Sweet hockey release! :laugh:

A.

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I so want to be golfing right now.   :sad:   The cross border trade offs work very well.  How come you're not helping me with my kitchen?!

I dunno ... what do you have to trade? Not an NHL season, I know that for sure! 2 more days until the World Juniors start!!! Sweet hockey release! :laugh:

A.

We're countrymen, we're supposed to help each other. I'm sure I've a recipe or two I could send your way :biggrin:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Let's get ready to rumble!!!!!

The use of the expression "fried chicken throwdown" has already been used by another worthy food-based organization, so I politely request something a bit more novel and creative for this competition.

I suppose Fry off has been used too? Ok, ok, it's not very novel!

So y'all are saying that at Varmint's Pig Pickin, there's gonna be a Cotton Pickin' Finger Lickin' Fried Chicken Battle of the Pans?

"I like 'em french fried pertaters." (Billy Bob Thornton as Karl, in Sling Blade.)
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breakfast was French toast and bacon as promised:

gallery_6080_502_1103822973.jpg

then I made cornbread

gallery_6080_502_1103823013.jpg

And put on some hot chocolate for the boys-turned-into icicles.

gallery_6080_502_1103822993.jpg

I've got one of the ovens on clean right now, and shortly I'll be starting the honey garlic meatballs. The great thing about these meatballs is they can be made several days ahead of when you want to use them. Don and I will have some tomorrow night, and I'll use the rest for nibbles on Sunday.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Following up on the last part of the chicken experiement. Next day cold chicken. If, as Dean says, the ultimate test of fried chicken is how good it is the next day, then Brooks' recipe wins hands down. No one except me would eat it, so I got one piece of each and stood over the kitchen sink as directed to eat it.

Brooks' chicken skin was still crisp and the chicken was nice and moist still. Dave's chicken skin on the other hand, had turned somewhat soggy, and the chicken had dried out somewhat.

So if you want fried chicken for dinner and don't care about left overs, Dave's is the way to go, although I think that Brooks' will be more equal to Dave's if you spice the chicken before flouring. On the other hand, if you want to make chicken for a picnic for your family or perhaps a special someone for a picnic for two, make Brooks.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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