Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

reuvens

Pacojet

Recommended Posts

i am about to buy a pacojet. it is quiet expensive so does anybody have experience with this incredible machine? is it solid or do i have to worry about anything?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i did quite a few shows for Boiron who is a producer of the finest frozen fruit pulp

on the european market; they teamed with the pacojet guys and so i did a lot of stuff with the machine, and i really have to say this thing ROCKS!! you can do sorbets a la minute, perfect farces, incredible herb oils, mousses, soups

and and and...

downside is that thing is FUCKING expensive...

but i know there is a korean or chinese copycat... that even uses the same containers. to get started you could also buy the consumer version, which

is no more produced, but can be bought on ebay with a little luck. this thiing is only 800 euros used.

cheers

t.


toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
but i know there is a korean or chinese copycat... that even uses the same containers. to get started you could also buy the consumer version, which

is no more produced, but can be bought on ebay with a little luck. this thiing is only 800 euros used.

cheers

t.

I didn't know there was a "consumer" version. Does anyone know what the difference is between that and the commercial one? Slower? Less heavy-duty motor?

Also, don't you need a commercial-quality freezer to make proper use of the pacojet? Their site refers to using a "4-star" freezer ( -4°F / -20°C ).

Schneich, any idea what the knock-off version is called?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Pacojet is totally worth it. We use it at El Bulli of course all the time. The only thing I´d say is that it´s UNDER-utilized in most kitchens - usually in pastry - whereas it´s killer in cuisine preps too. It´s like a nuclear-powered food processor. We were just talking the other night about it - saying we´re not sure if you´d put rocks into it that you might just get sand. It´s amazing. And seriously - find a friend and get the multiple unit discount - if they still have it. I don´t know why people don´t have one at home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might want to ask this on the Baking and Pastry board... I think you will find more people who use a pacojet regularly... that's where we pastry chefs lurk...

I, too, want to know more about it, as I have heard great things, but never used it, and am wanting to recommend it to my new employer.


I like to cook with wine. Sometimes I even add it to the food.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Pacojet is totally worth it. We use it at El Bulli of course all the time. The only thing I´d say is that it´s UNDER-utilized in most kitchens - usually in pastry - whereas it´s killer in cuisine preps too. It´s like a nuclear-powered food processor. We were just talking the other night about it - saying we´re not sure if you´d put rocks into it that you might just get sand. It´s amazing. And seriously - find a friend and get the multiple unit discount - if they still have it. I don´t know why people don´t have one at home.

can you give some tips and advises how this nuclear weapon can be used in the daily kitchen prep except for pastry. i know that the restaurants use it for farce and stuff, but that doesn't seem to be a "wow" for me and this machine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could someone explain how it works? I've seen it used for making ice cream (out of foie gras at the Adria demo), but I don't know the mechanics of it. Is it a jet of air which pulverizes anything in the can? Is it temperature dependent? Can it be hot or cold?


Edited by MobyP (log)

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

Flickr Food

"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Could someone explain how it works? I've seen it used for making ice cream (out of foie gras at the Adria demo), but I don't know the mechanics of it. Is it a jet of air which pulverizes anything in the can? Is it temperature dependent? Can it be hot or cold?

try www.pacojet.com first and when you have further questions........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it's basically a very powerful food processor that shaves frozen solid liquids very very finely, producing a very fine ice cream. Can also be used for sauces, pate, etc.

I had a look on ebay today only 3 available and at the price i might as well buy a new one from pacojet.

schneich you said you knew of a asian copycat product ?

I think a lot of us here would be interested in having a look at it.

Any idea of the name of the product or a website ??

thanks


"so tell me how do you bone a chicken?"

"tastes so good makes you want to slap your mamma!!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
schneich you said you knew of a asian copycat product ?

I think a lot of us here would be interested in having a look at it. 

Any idea of the name of the product or a website ??

i try to remember the name.. one of the guys from pacojet once mentioned

it to me...

btw. a friend of mine uses the home version in his restaurant since

more than 4 years without any hassle....

cheers

t.


toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

as i talked to the german salesman for pacojet in germany. the company is refusing to repair or give any other service to any other producht than a pacojet with an original serial number. as it doen't happen very often that a pacojet needs any service. that is the reason why there are so little numbers of used ones on the market.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
can you give some tips and advises how this nuclear weapon can be used in the daily kitchen prep except for pastry. i know that the restaurants use it for farce and stuff, but that doesn't seem to be a "wow" for me and this machine.

when you have given your biceps, triceps and everything in between a good workout after trying to force meat through a tamis(i think the patent belongs to marquis de sade) and begging god and/or the devil to put you out of the never ending misery, you WILL be 'wow'ed. trust me. another nice thing is that you can only process stuff in small batches which means less wastage. you just need to invest in a lot of those containers. just shove them into your freezer if you are done with it and you can reuse them! because its frozen, it doesnt go bad and a another whirl in the pacojet makes it ready for service. you can pretty much process anything with a pacojet. truly amazing.

edited to add: acc to their website, other than ice creams/sorbets, the pacojet can be used for farces/terrines, mousses, sauces, soups, herb and spice concentrates.


Edited by Lalitha (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sounds good at all and i know that in almost every professional kitchen you can find one of those machines. i used this forum to ask people how they use their pacojet in their daily mise en place. so now i can imagine that it is worth buying it. but please dont hesitate and keep on going with recipes and ideas!

vue

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone know where I can get a pacojet for less than £2000?

Petrus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Does anyone know where  I can get a pacojet for less than £2000?

Petrus

to be honest with you, i looked at this option but i was warned off it as you would be very very lucky to find a machine in great condition second hand asd most people keep them for life you would be better going to trade show where magrini have a stand and doing a show deal as they bend a little more there, thats what i did also push for more beakers too you will be suprised how many you need

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

possibly I'm the only person who doesn't much care for Pacojet machines. I don't think they make good ice cream, merely frozen mousse with soft texture. A recently churned ice cream made the usual way tastes and feels fabulous - better in my opinion

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

pacojet does not make ice-cream...it is pure marketing crap from the manufacturer.

you cann find used professional ice-cream machines for around £2-2,500 which make an excellent product. in that price range you'll be looking for a 2 to 2 1/2 litre capacity table top machine. Lusso an other machines which are geared for restaurants are not the same as professional machines.

-che


Edited by CheGuevara (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want to love my PacoJet, really, I do. I love that I can take any plain base and instantly change the flavor by spinning in any number of items. I love that I can spin 20 quarts of ice cream in no time at all. I love how small it is. What I don't love is how often it breaks. Twice a year, I have to sheepishly go to my boss and explain that the PacoJets are acting up again and despite my babying them and reading anything I can find about how to love your PacoJet, we will once again have to pump hundreds of dollars into them. And I do baby them. I'd rub them with farm fresh, unpasteurized milk every day if I thought it would help.

This time, the motor stopped starting up when I pushed start. All the green lights are on, I push the button, the up arrow turns green, and nothing. I took it to my local repair (I'm in Los Angeles) and they said I need a new control board and tubes and a scraper, to the tune of $826. When I inquire about is it normal after 5 years to need that, how come the machines keep breaking, why do they keep breaking, they can't help me very much and say it's like having to replace the brakes on your car. Yes, but I don't replace the brakes on my car every six months, like we've been doing with the tubes and scraper.

I emailed the two other repair places in the country and they both said it sounds sketchy and send in the machine. My question is, where do you send your machine? I've got the distributer and the place in the New York. Any experience with these places? How much does the shipping set you back? And any other insights would be wildly appreciated.

You never know, maybe Paco and I will mention you in our vows when we make up and try to make this romance work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. Ive seen these on Great British Menu. will the lottery did ya? good for you

add a blast freezer, and there you go!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am also looking at blast chillers.

I have a thing for kitchen toys. What can I say.


If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe. - Carl Sagan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

make sure it does freezing !

already have a dual Combi-oven do ya?

digital evaporator/distiller next. also saw that on GBM.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have a combi-oven. I like my toys under $10k. Preferably under $5k.

My current focus is on the Pacojet. Not sure what will pique my interest after that.

I'm trying to make my yard full of edibles. So I need a way to preserve my harvest.

This year I added lingonberries, highbush cranberries, blackberries, black raspberries, red raspberries, boysenberries and rhubarb. The serviceberry tree is too small to count.

Last year I planted a peach tree, a bartlett pear, an Asian pear, red currants, black currants, champagne currants, strawberries and blueberries.

It will take years to get a good harvest so I have time to find the right toys.


If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe. - Carl Sagan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...