Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
Craig Camp

Gambero Rosso: April's Issue digest discussion

Recommended Posts

Seconded! Only those who've actually gone through the labours of writing a thorough synopsis or summary know how difficult it is. Yours, Alberto, was perfect. Many thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to both of you for the compliments.

I'd just like to add that if anyone has some interest in a particular article I would be happy to provide further info, work duties and time permitting.


Il Forno: eating, drinking, baking... mostly side effect free. Italian food from an Italian kitchen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, great job. I am interested in more information about the Parma eating spots.

I embarrassed to say that we'll only be passing through Parma on our last day on the way to airport home. But we have about 8 hours to kill somewhere, and I though Parma sounded like a unique, old, not huge stopping-off point.

Does the article give any "have to's" you might pass along?

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

pedalaforte,

the article gives a few tips for eating out and food-related shopping. In both cases the focus is the typical salumi and stuffed pastas.

Good food-souveniers could be some special salumi like culatello (cured pork buttock, the king of Parmesan salumi), spalla cruda e cotta (dry-cured and baked pork shoulder), the different local salami and clearly some good Parmigiano Reggiano (look for different ripening ages, from 24 to 48 months, and the so called "mountain" Parmigiano).

A few addresses whose description in the article sound interesting:

Specialita' di Parma (via Farini 9)

Pasini (s.da Repubblica 83)

Casa del Formaggio (via N. Bixio 106)

Restaurants specialise mainly in traditional local cooking. So lots of salumi as antipasti, stuffed pastas (tortelli and co) and selection of bolliti (boiled meats).

Some eating palces that have a good reputation:

Cocchi, restaurant of the Hotel Danieli (via Gramsci 16a), very appreiated by locals with a good wine choice and corresponding proces.

Sorelle Picchi (via Farini 27) a famous salumeria and rosticceria (take away) serving all the local classics and with a few tables available at the back.

Hope you have a nice time!


Il Forno: eating, drinking, baking... mostly side effect free. Italian food from an Italian kitchen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grazie, Alberto. You are kind to do this for me.

I will bring your list with me on my trip -- and put it to good use.

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By haresfur
      I found this article about arancino/arancina really interesting
       

    • By jennyandthejets
      I'll be in Naples for a few days next month and I wanted to try something traditional, and my friend recommended trying parmigiana. She said she loved it, but the problem is that she ate it at her Italian friend's house, and I won't be able to have that exact parmigiana. So, I did some research online and found a few restaurants that have good ratings and are serving allegedly great eggplant casserole. This place is 4 stars rated, but people seem not to agree whether the parmigiana is good or not.... On the other hand, this place has a great rating, appears when searching for the parmigiana, but nobody seems to write about it in their reviews. Finally, this one is said to have the best parmigiana in Naples (or in the world, for that matter), and I wanted to know if anyone had the so-called world's best?
      I would really appreciate if you could help me make the decision. Looking forward to your advice!

    • By alacarte
      I recently took a trip to Northern Italy, and was delighted to find that the cappuccino everywhere was just wonderful, without exception. Smooth, flavorful, aromatic perfect crema, strong but not too strong.
      Aside from the obvious answer (duh, Italians created cappuccino ), what makes Italian capp so fantastic, and how do I duplicate the effect here?
      I'm wondering if it's the water, the way the coffee is ground or stored, the machines used....I'm baffled.
      Also noticed that the serving size tended to be smaller than what I'm used to -- i.e. a small teacupful vs. a brimming mug or Starbucks supersize. Not sure why that is either.
      Grazie mille for any insight on this!
    • By Modernist Cuisine Team
      The Modernist Cuisine team is currently traveling the globe to research pizza and different pizza styles for our next book Modernist Pizza.  Nathan and the team will be in São Paulo and Buenos Aires soon. We'd love hear from the eGullet community—what pizzerias should they visit while they're there? You can read more about our next book Modernist Pizza here. Thanks in advance, everyone! 
    • By scordelia
      My article was published (my first one!)! Hooray! And I do have some Florentine restaurant recommendations including the new Osteria del Pavone which is amazing--lampredotto ravioli is now a thing and it must be tried.
       
      http://www.classicchicagomagazine.com/florence-in-winter/
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...