Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Cooking shows in Japan


Jason Perlow
 Share

Recommended Posts

I don't know of any other TV show that features only a single railway line every week. The 'tabi bangumi' (journey program on TV) of the longest standing is Tooku e Ikitai (Wanting to Go Far Away).

Official website of Tooku e Ikitai

http://www.to-ku.com/

wikipedia page on this TV program

http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E9%81%A0%E3%...95%AA%E7%B5%84)

Interestingly, in my area (Niigata), this program is aired from 9:30 p.m. to 10:00 every Saturday, followed by Burari from 10:00 to 10:30.

I sometimes watch Burari and find it quite interesting.

Another TV program of long standing is Kuishinbou, aired from 9:54 p.m. to 10:00 (only six minutes).

Website of Kuishinbou

http://www.fujitv.co.jp/kuishinbo/index2.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In Hawaii we only have 1 Japanese channel, and it doesn't show Tooku e Ikitai or Kuishinbou. :sad:

There is Soko ga Shiritai, although I find this show a hit-or-miss, meaning sometimes the topic is very interesting and sometimes not.

http://www.kikutv.com/shows/Japanese_Progr...itai/index.html

Edited by Kiem Hwa (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I have a feeling that the Burari episodes we get over here are WAY old... I looked for tonight's episodes on the Chidoya line in the show archives, and although I could find two other episodes along the Chidoya line, there wasn't the one we had on tonight... and the archive dates to the beginning of 2003.....

In any case, I wanted to mention some cool things eaten along the Chidoya line...

At a tempura shop (in Ginza?) they had a tempura shop set up in a similar way as a sushi bar with the chef behind a clear glass cabinet-counter, and he made the tempura right behind the counter.... well, he made roe-tempura.....I didn't catch the type of fish, but a big clump of white-ish roe sacks tempura-ed.....oishi so desu!

Also, later the host ate aburrage donburi....aburrage slices boiled in a shoyu-sugar-dashi (donburi) sauce, with an egg cooked over it.... yum!!! We are going to try and make this sometime soon.

Also, there was some aka-Negi (red-colored Japanese Large green onions), where the red color is acquired from something in the water/soil.... this special Negi can only be grown in Katsuramura.

More on Aka-Negi:

http://oishii-web.hp.infoseek.co.jp/sozaie/fe.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My sister and I just watched a great show about Japanese cuisine the other day on the weekly NY Japanese programming...there weren't any subtitles, so I hope those who know the show can understand my explanation! I think that one or a few of four (male) hosts travel Japan and learn about different regional dishes; the hosts seemed to go to the coast a lot. The episode we watched seemed to be a retrospective of past episodes; the dates of the featured eps went back to 1988! This was really great to watch - I'd love to learn more about the show! Any ideas of what I'm talking about, and what the show is called?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just to add to Amy's post: it seemed that the show had different hosts since 1988. What we saw was (I think) some kind of get-together reunion show. One focus that the show seemed to have was on weird foods. The hosts would try a soup with a scary-looking ingredient and comment upon it. But, like Amy said, it also had a regional focus as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My sister and I just watched a great show about Japanese cuisine the other day on the weekly NY Japanese programming...there weren't any subtitles, so I hope those who know the show can understand my explanation!  I think that one or a few of four (male) hosts travel Japan and learn about different regional dishes; the hosts seemed to go to the coast a lot.  The episode we watched seemed to be a retrospective of past episodes; the dates of the featured eps went back to 1988!  This was really great to watch - I'd love to learn more about the show!  Any ideas of what I'm talking about, and what the show is called?

The show you described was the hour-long new year special for Kuishimbo Banzai! From what I understand, Kuishimbo Banzai is a short magazine program used to fill in time between programs. The male host of the new year show is that tennis player (forgot his name), and the panel were former Kuishimbo hosts, including the guy who has a phobia for snakes, who was forced to eat some.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Haha...I finally figured out, the Burari episodes showing over here are quite old....tonight's two episodes were from May 2003!!

Ooedo-sen: 大江戸線

http://www.ntv.co.jp/burari/030503/0503housou.html

In Ryogoku, the host ate kakiage-don: donburi of tempura prawn-cuttlefish-scallops, fried in 100% sesame oil! Is frying in pure sesame oil common? It sounds delicous, but quite expensive!

In Tsukiji (Kachidoki-eki), at a Yakiniku restaurant, the host ate Kalbi covered with a negi (large Japanese green onions)-salt baste. Also, he ate Negi-gohan.

Finally, in Shinjuku, at a restaurant called つくし "Tsukushi", the chef only cooks a few dishes a day, depending on available seasonal specialties. you can't see the pic very well on the link, but it included takenoko-dengaku (skewered bamboo shoot) coated with various sauces: a kinome-miso sauce (kinome = bud of Japanese pepper tree), and a yuzu-miso sauce. A tomato stuffed with takenoko and chicken, and various other dishes that werent explained.....looks delicious!

Ikegami-sen: 池上線

http://www.ntv.co.jp/burari/030517/0517housou.html

The host ate French food: a sole-souffle

He also discovered a pan-shop where they make many variations of anpan: with plum wine, red wine, yomogi, and several other flavors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What a detailed account! You really are into this TV show.

In Ryogoku, the host ate kakiage-don: donburi of tempura prawn-cuttlefish-scallops, fried in 100% sesame oil!  Is frying in pure sesame oil common?  It sounds delicous, but quite expensive!

My wife and I use salad oil only. Some are like us, others add some sesame oil, and I think that those who use sesame oil only at home are rather exceptional. According to several sources, you are recommended to mix salad and sesame seed oils at the ratio of 7:3 or 8:2 to make flavorful tempura.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What a detailed account!  You really are into this TV show.
In Ryogoku, the host ate kakiage-don: donburi of tempura prawn-cuttlefish-scallops, fried in 100% sesame oil!  Is frying in pure sesame oil common?  It sounds delicous, but quite expensive!

My wife and I use salad oil only. Some are like us, others add some sesame oil, and I think that those who use sesame oil only at home are rather exceptional. According to several sources, you are recommended to mix salad and sesame seed oils at the ratio of 7:3 or 8:2 to make flavorful tempura.

Also, sesame oil has a low burning point. My Japanese friends taught me to use a little (they never measured; just poured into the pan -- a couple of tablespoonfuls is what I figure) sesame oil along with regular salad oil for frying chicken karaage. Sesame oil is so flavorful that a little goes a long way!

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember watching on tv quite a while back about how some tempura shops used 100% sesame oil for the tempura. I started cooking tempura and other fried foods by adding just a couple tablespoons, it is too expensive to use 100%. I have slowly fallen out of that practice though.....

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

I just read in the paper yesterday, that Dotchi no Ryori is changing its format. It will only have one host (the older man, I think), and three tarento. The remaining judges will be made up of some lucky audience members. I'm not too happy with the change--I love the relationship between the two hosts. However, maybe I'll have a chance to be one of those lucky audience judges!

Edited to add...I made a mistake--it's not lucky audience members (those present for the taping), it's members of the public who get to be on the show! Check out their website for more information on how you, too can participate!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

did anyone seen "dotchi" last night? it was mince katsu versus mince omelette. i missed the first food showcase but i know it was oil - what kind of oil was it??

oh - and what did you think of the 100 yen eggs? gorgeous but wow! 100 yen per egg :blink:

"Thy food shall be thy medicine" -Hippocrates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

did anyone seen "dotchi" last night?  it was mince katsu versus mince omelette.  i missed the first food showcase but i know it was oil - what kind of oil was it??

oh - and what did you think of the 100 yen eggs?  gorgeous but wow!  100 yen per egg :blink:

I did. Rapeseed (canola?) oil, if I remember right.

100 yen eggs? I'd like to taste them once in my lifetime.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

did anyone seen "dotchi" last night?  it was mince katsu versus mince omelette.  i missed the first food showcase but i know it was oil - what kind of oil was it??

oh - and what did you think of the 100 yen eggs?  gorgeous but wow!  100 yen per egg :blink:

I saw a very small bit of the show--not enough to answer any of your questions, but which one won? I wanted the mince katsu. It looked so yummy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

mince katsu won! actually, it was the first time i saw results like these - only one one person chose the omelette! i was sure mince katsu would win - the omelette had cheese in it.

hiroyuki: the eggs looked amazing! it think the company was takahashi tamago - if you ever have the chance - report back here please!

"Thy food shall be thy medicine" -Hippocrates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

mince katsu won!  actually, it was the first time i saw results like these - only one one person chose the omelette!  i was sure mince katsu would win - the omelette had cheese in it. 

hiroyuki:  the eggs looked amazing!  it think the company was takahashi tamago - if you ever have the chance - report back here please!

You have good memory. You are right. takahashi tamago, in Hidaka city, Saitama prefecture

(有)たかはしたまご(埼玉県日高市旭ヶ丘)

http://www.ytv.co.jp/docchi/index_this.html

http://www.citydo.com/prf/saitama/guide/sg/255001027.html

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...