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Molded Chocolates: Technique Questions [MERGED TOPIC]

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I also use this technique quite often with transfer sheets instead of acetate to get a print on the bottom of the chocolate and, like Lior said, its not really that messy once you get the technique down.

so you put a transfer on the bottom. Interesting. any pics?

Luis

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Here is a picture of when I did the transfer on the back of the bar a week or so ago. I put chocolate on row one-near me and then haphazardly squiggle chocolate here and there, and it worked very nicely, not too little and only slight mess. As said earlier, the mess was incredibly easy to clean-shiny and peeled straight off all surfaces.

gallery_53591_4944_169858.jpg


Edited by Lior (log)

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Those are backed off beautifully.  Thanks for the pics!

I'll trust you guys on the mess factor.  Maybe that guy in the video is just messy.

The trick to minimising mess is to use the minimum amount of chocolate that allows you to scrape across and get the acetate to stick - you usually get the amount right in 3 or 4 moulds

I tried this technique tonight and it does require a certain level of experimentation - not enough chocolate and you don't get the smoothness, too much and you get a mess. Tonight I did not leave enough chocolate and hence had some "dips". I will try again tomorrow.

It really looks tricky to me, Anna, but I want to try it soon. Please let us know if you come across a good method.

It really is not difficult. I did it again this morning using a transfer on the back of a mold of solid chocolate. However, I managed to get a wrinkle in there! :angry: I would have shared a photo but my daughter borrowed my camera!

I am not esp. interested in getting shiny backs but very interested in putting a transfer on the back of some molds. Next challenge will be to try and back off filled chocolates in a similar fashion but I will use plain acetate for that. I'll let you know how it works.

If you want to try it and you have a thin mold that is good for solid chocolates I think you will find it easy to experiment with techniques. If you use plain acetate you have nothing to lose - just re- temper and try again.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Those are backed off beautifully.  Thanks for the pics!

I'll trust you guys on the mess factor.  Maybe that guy in the video is just messy.

The trick to minimising mess is to use the minimum amount of chocolate that allows you to scrape across and get the acetate to stick - you usually get the amount right in 3 or 4 moulds

I tried this technique tonight and it does require a certain level of experimentation - not enough chocolate and you don't get the smoothness, too much and you get a mess. Tonight I did not leave enough chocolate and hence had some "dips". I will try again tomorrow.

It really looks tricky to me, Anna, but I want to try it soon. Please let us know if you come across a good method.

It really is not difficult. I did it again this morning using a transfer on the back of a mold of solid chocolate. However, I managed to get a wrinkle in there! :angry: I would have shared a photo but my daughter borrowed my camera!

I am not esp. interested in getting shiny backs but very interested in putting a transfer on the back of some molds. Next challenge will be to try and back off filled chocolates in a similar fashion but I will use plain acetate for that. I'll let you know how it works.

If you want to try it and you have a thin mold that is good for solid chocolates I think you will find it easy to experiment with techniques. If you use plain acetate you have nothing to lose - just re- temper and try again.

I am interested in trying this technique especially for bars. When I make a chocolate bar that's just chocolate (no inclusions like nuts or fruit), it's difficult to keep the very fluid chocolate from spilling over and ruining the edge. You have to keep the mold absolutely level until it begins to crystallize a bit. Using the acetate would definitely solve that problem.


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Third attempt today with a transfer on the back of solid chocs and it worked like a charm. As someone else said, it's a matter of determining how much choc to leave on the mold and then to get the right angle of the scraper and the right wrist action.

Next up is trying it on filled chocolates but that won't be for a day or two.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Here is a picture of when I did the transfer on the back of the bar a week or so ago. I put chocolate on row one-near me and then haphazardly squiggle chocolate here and there, and it worked very nicely, not too little and only slight mess. As said earlier, the mess was incredibly easy to clean-shiny and peeled straight off all surfaces.

gallery_53591_4944_169858.jpg

looks good.

Luis

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:cool: Thanks!!!

One quick question. I'm heading over to my kitchen in a few hours. When you put the acetate sheet and scrap it with the scraper, do you leave the acetate on while it drys or do you pull it off right away?

Luis

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Leave it to dry before pulling off

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It's a little more time consuming, but if you want you can use a guitar sheet or acetate to cap your chocolates. It makes for the most 'perfect' finish and also allows you to have more filling and a less thick base. You ladle chocolate on just one edge of the mould, put the plastic so that it covers the open surface of the mould and then, using a squeegee or triangle spatula, pull the chocolate across to the other side

I would like to try the acetate method for bottoming chocolates during the holidays. Most of the talk about this method in this thread dealt with solid chocolate. I would like to try this on filled chocolates. Anna, I think you were going to try it... did it work out for you? I was thinking you would have to sort of fill using your spatula before doing the acetate method to ensure the chocolate fills each cavity properly. I would be concerned with just using the acetate method as there might be crevices left unfilled. I would love to hear people's thoughts and experiences. HQAntithesis - it sounds like you just go for it with the acetate on your filled chocolates. Do you have any issues with unfilled spaces?

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It's a little more time consuming, but if you want you can use a guitar sheet or acetate to cap your chocolates. It makes for the most 'perfect' finish and also allows you to have more filling and a less thick base. You ladle chocolate on just one edge of the mould, put the plastic so that it covers the open surface of the mould and then, using a squeegee or triangle spatula, pull the chocolate across to the other side

I would like to try the acetate method for bottoming chocolates during the holidays. Most of the talk about this method in this thread dealt with solid chocolate. I would like to try this on filled chocolates. Anna, I think you were going to try it... did it work out for you? I was thinking you would have to sort of fill using your spatula before doing the acetate method to ensure the chocolate fills each cavity properly. I would be concerned with just using the acetate method as there might be crevices left unfilled. I would love to hear people's thoughts and experiences. HQAntithesis - it sounds like you just go for it with the acetate on your filled chocolates. Do you have any issues with unfilled spaces?

It worked fine for me with filled chocolates without pre-coating the bottoms. I gave up for the time being as I was making a bigger mess each time I tried it. :wacko:

However, it does work well and seems to make a good seal. In the meantime I have learned to work much more cleanly backing off traditionally so I have not returned to the acetate method. I expect I will give it another go soon.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Thanks Anna. I don't think I would use this method on a regular basis but want to use it for some special Valentine chocolates I will be making... my 'jewels'! Glad to hear you don't have to pre-coat first. It's already more work - don't want to add more!

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When I use transfer sheets (or acetate) on the bottom of moulded chocolates I close them as normal, let it set and then apply the transfer with a thin layer of chocolate.

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When I use transfer sheets (or acetate) on the bottom of moulded chocolates I close them as normal, let it set and then apply the transfer with a thin layer of chocolate.

Ahhhhhh. I normally do a 'beauty coat' when bottoming traditionally. I guess doing the beauty coat using acetate would just be extra beautiful! Thanks for the tip.

.


Edited by mostlylana (log)

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I've found the easiest way to do it is put a pile of chocolate at one end of the mould, press the transfer sheet down on the chocolate and then scrape across to the other side of the mould. (Hope that makes sense)

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I've found the easiest way to do it is put a pile of chocolate at one end of the mould, press the transfer sheet down on the chocolate and then scrape across to the other side of the mould. (Hope that makes sense)

Yes, it makes perfect sense. Actually the link to the video that Lior posted in this thread shows the method as you describe. I'll have to wait until after Christmas to try it though - it's time to make turkey!

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I've tried a guitar sheet and a thin piece of acetate, and the thin piece worked much better. the guitar sheet seemed too thick.

Merry Christmas everyone.

Luis

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I've tried a guitar sheet and a thin piece of acetate, and the thin piece worked much better. the guitar sheet seemed too thick.

Merry Christmas everyone.

Luis

Great tip - thanks. I'm thinking the acetate would give a shinier appearance as well. Here in the interior of BC, Canada it's been snowing for about a week. It's going to be a picture perfect Christmas (even though the patio door is frozen shut so we can't actually get out to the back yard!) Merry Christmas all!

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I've tried a guitar sheet and a thin piece of acetate, and the thin piece worked much better. the guitar sheet seemed too thick.

Merry Christmas everyone.

Luis

I've tried using a sheet of .005 inch thick acetate and it was definitely too thick. The acetate wasn't very flexible and I ended up with an almost continuous chocolate back on the mold, i.e., I couldn't push out all of the chocolate to just seal the cavities. Next time, I'll try something thinner. Meanwhile, back to more traditional ways of sealing the bottoms of my chocolates!


Edited by cmflick (log)

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Here's a picture of when I tried the method a while back. I used a largepiping bag as I had no other sheet in my house at the time!! It worked great. I hope I am not posting this picture a second time- I can't remember if Ipostedit and I am too lazy to look!! Happy holidays to all!!

gallery_53591_4944_112044.jpg

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I used the same sheets i use on my boards to put a foot down. http://www.papermart.com/templates/47-0-15.htm

you need to do it a few times to get the hang of it. what i do is scrap off excess with an offset spatula, then put just a little bit of chocolate over each piece then put the acetate sheet down then scrape. that way there is not that much excess chocolate to worry about.

Luis


Edited by sote23 (log)

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Hi sorry I haven't replied in a while. About unfilled gaps when using the acetate, they do happen: more so if the space between the filling and the acetate is quite large as well as depending if the surface of the filling is concave of convex. One way of avoiding this is get some chocolate onto the back of the mould and work it back and forth with a spatula, then scrape off the excess. Let it nearly fully crystallise, and then do the acetate technique. The advantage of this is you'll find the surfaces are even flatter still, compared with the slip dip in the otherwise smooth surface if you do it all at once. It's also less likely to have the hairline crack between the moulded portion of the shell and the base.

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yes that is how I do it. On certain molds, when closing the regular way, I often seem to get that hairline crack you described. It seems to depend on the mold! It is extremely annoying.

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yes that is how I do it. On certain molds, when closing the regular way, I often seem to get that hairline crack you described. It seems to depend on the mold! It is extremely annoying.

A little trick I was taught: If you are capping chocolates the regular way and want to avoid the hairline crack, give the uncapped moulds a short blast with the heatgun before you go to cap them. This will cause the chocolate in the shell to "open up" the capping cavity. When you cap the chocolates, the shell chocolate will then contract and form a tight seal with the cap.

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