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Rachel Perlow

The Perlows to visit New Orleans

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Hotels around the convention center are not all that cheap, the operators know they have a captive market and charge accordingly. There are a couple of b&b's near by in the lower garden district. I had a very nice breakfast at Rene Bistro at the Renassiance hotel in the CBD. Chef Rene Bayeux was a great guy, very friendly and personable.

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I am on my way at a rediculously early hour to pick up the Perlows for a brief tour of Cajun Country. Or at least I am going to pick them up if they avoided exploding last night.

I met the Perlow's last evening in the Carrollton area of Uptown New Orleans at Jacques-Imo's. :biggrin:

Dinner at Jacques-Imo's was, to put it mildly, a hit. At one point in the meal Jason decided that he just had to order one more thing. The sound he made when that deep fried roast beef po boy hit the table was EXACTLY the same sound that Homer Simpson makes when he slowly keels over from a long session at the donut counter (aaarrglllghhhhllleeehhhhaarrrgghhh :wacko: ).

Briefly dinner consisted of

Shrimp and Alligator Sausage Cheesecake

Chicken Livers on toast (trust me on this one, just order it)

Something Else very good involving oysters and butter and garlic

Eggplant Pirouges with shrimp, crabmeat, oysters and art. hearts

Stuffed Merlitons

Fried Chicken (Austin WAS in the house)

Deep Fried Roast Beef Po Boy

Some kind of thick two layer chocolate mousse cake (in house, full time, pastry chef. rare here in New Orleans. )

White Chocolate Brownie (Oh Lord, please let me eat this last bite before you take me from this place)

Then it was over to the Maple Leaf so they could soak up a little underlife.

Jason photographed everything that moved, so I am pretty sure you will be seeing all of this food somewhere/ Gotta Go pick em up. I will try to bring you breaking news of exploding tourists as it occurs.

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Where to stay? Going to be spending some time at the convention center, but not sure that's where to stay. I am one who, while appreciating grand hotels, is loath to spend grand sums for the experience.

I really love The Chimes B&B. The breakfast is actually good, and the fresh fruit is great when you're eating all that deep fried stuff all day, but the best part is you're in walking distance of Casamento's. They're cheaper than a hotel and nicer.

If you're at a huge conference like I was, there is a shuttle stop at the nearby Hampton Inn on St. Charles. If you're not, the trolly on St. Charles or the 11 bus on Magazine will get you to the convention center in around 15 minutes.

regards,

trillium

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I am on my way at a rediculously early hour to pick up the Perlows for a brief tour of Cajun Country.

Goodie goodie goodie....

I can't wait to hear their take on the countryside. Waiting with bated breath.

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I am on my way at a rediculously early hour to pick up the Perlows for a brief tour of Cajun Country. Or at least I am going to pick them up if they avoided exploding last night.

I met the Perlow's last evening in the Carrollton area of Uptown New Orleans at Jacques-Imo's. :biggrin:

Dinner at Jacques-Imo's was, to put it mildly, a hit. At one point in the meal Jason decided that he just had to order one more thing. The sound he made when that deep fried roast beef po boy hit the table was EXACTLY the same sound that Homer Simpson makes when he slowly keels over from a long session at the donut counter (aaarrglllghhhhllleeehhhhaarrrgghhh :wacko: ).

Briefly dinner consisted of

Shrimp and Alligator Sausage Cheesecake

Chicken Livers on toast (trust me on this one, just order it)

Something Else very good involving oysters and butter and garlic

Eggplant Pirouges with shrimp, crabmeat, oysters and art. hearts

Stuffed Merlitons

Fried Chicken (Austin WAS in the house)

Deep Fried Roast Beef Po Boy

Some kind of thick two layer chocolate mousse cake (in house, full time, pastry chef. rare here in New Orleans. )

White Chocolate Brownie (Oh Lord, please let me eat this last bite before you take me from this place)

Then it was over to the Maple Leaf so they could soak up a little underlife.

Jason photographed everything that moved, so I am pretty sure you will be seeing all of this food somewhere/ Gotta Go pick em up. I will try to bring you breaking news of exploding tourists as it occurs.

Damn. I put on 2 pounds just reading about this meal.

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O.K.

Just returned to Royal St apt. after dropping off a couple of tired but very happy yankee tourists. Jason photographed everything he put into his face (no small feat on a day like today, trust me) so I am sure that there will be a full report. He also stocked up on boucherie products from Hebert's in Maurice and Poche's in Breaux Bridge (where, just to ruin any semi humorous tales from the guy in the shotgun position and the backseat driver, I got a little turned around in the dark in the swamp and we ended up having a little adventure before we got to Poche's. But all was forgiven as soon as the Perleauxs, who will never be know ever again as the Kosher Kajuns, saw the delights located behind the pristine glass counters of the meat case in this pork product mecca).

The highpoint of my day (and I think a delightful suprise for our skeptical travelers) was a stop early in the morning at Lejeune's Bakery in Jeanerette. They only make two things, french bread that is so good it will make you slap your grandma and delicious ginger cake (a soft gingerbread cookie, basically). I got 4 loaves of still warm bread and 6 cakes, plus a small paper grocery sack of broken gingerbreads to make breadpudding out of (.75 cent thank you very much). The place has been there since the twenties and so has the help. Jason took photos, and you will see what I mean when you see them.

I will let them tell you about their trip, but I would like to say what a pleasant day it was today and I was very pleased to spend the day showing these hapless northerners the better parts of our little culinary wonderland. It would be a massive understatement to describe them as "enthusiastic". There was not an unpleasant moment (except for when Rachel called me a "man" for sensibly and methodically circling in on Poche's rather than asking directions :angry: ). They are lovely people and pretty game tourists to boot. I look forward to the next trip.

Edited for substandard typing technique


Edited by Mayhaw Man (log)

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I just got through eating a 1/2 of a boned chicken with shrimp stuffing gotten yesterday at Hebert's Meat Market in Maurice, LA. Wonderful. Everything that is right with this simple, yet delicious dish is basically what makes South Louisiana such a wonderful place to eat. Earthy, filling, spicy, easy, tasty. My little world at it's best.

So there. It was good and I love this place.

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I'm glad they had fun. It's nice to get people out of Nawlins for a little while. Nothing against New Orleans. But we all know that not all of France is like Paris, and not all of Louisiana is like NOLA.

Oh, God. Lejeunes. You picked a good one there. They only do a few things, but the stuff they do is the pinnacle of that particular endeavor.

Nice call.

Last night, I discovered an Hebert's crawfish stuffed chicken lurking in the freezer from the last trip. Guess what's for supper tonight...

Edit=fixed typo


Edited by FistFullaRoux (log)

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Jason is networking Upperline's computers before we head out to Mosca's with JoAnn, so I have another opportunity for an update. Let's see, where did we leave off? Oh yes, on our way to Jacques-Imo's. The cheesecake is basically a quiche. A really good quiche. Didn't need the remoulade sauce on top, too distracting. The chicken livers were amazing. I usually stear away from any liver that isn't chopped, Jewish-style. This was sauteed, firm almost crispy on the outside, creamy on the inside, with a tart, dark, onion-vinegar sauce. Anyone have the recipe? Brooks - get it from Jack for me, huh? The mains were good, the fried chicken was good cold for breakfast yesterday (too much food :wacko:), but the desserts, oh my. As per usual, I asked which desserts were made in house -- all, and they have a pastry chef hired away from The Inn at Little Washington. Their white chocolate bread pudding (was there bread in there? It seemed all pudding) was better than a certain other w.c.p.b. ever was.

Tuesday was traveling with Mayhaw Man day. We ripped into our bread from Lejeune with passion, being that we hadn't had breakfast and were on the road for about 2.5 hours at that point (there was traffic leaving NO). New Iberia seemed convenient for lunch, so we consulted Brooks' Cajun guide book (I forgot the name, I'm sure it's up there in a post above) and settled on Lagniappe Too, a cute little luncheonette with the best gumbo and bread pudding (with actual bread in it) of our trip. We caught up with a custom furniture carpenter who uses salvaged cypress from barns scheduled for demolition or damaged by hurricanes. Jason now wants to redo our living room in craftsman cyprus. :rolleyes:

The Tobasco tour was a waste of time, other than getting to see Avery Island. They have touricized the tour, with a video and a museum and a look through the glass at the bottling facility. Almost everything in their store can be bought through their catalog or website, except for the pepper mash (maybe if you call for it?) that alot of folks down here use for crawfish boil. I know someone above said to do the tour and forget the Jungle Gardens, but I have a feeling the Jungle Gardens would have been more interesting in comparison. I will recommend the McIlhenny Farms Coarse Ground Mustard and the Tabasco Chipoltle from the tasting. Mmm.

We then proceded to Hebert's where I was jealous of Mayhaw Man's proximity. We didn't buy anything there because it was all fresh and I couldn't see how we could get the stuff home without spoilage. We then proceded on the quest to Poche's, where I was assured of mail orderability. I will spare the details about the length of said quest, let it suffice to say I don't think Mayhaw Man had ever tried to drive there at night or Mrs. Mayhaw is the usual driver or navigator and that's why he's never had such trouble finding the place before. We eventually found someone at a quickiemart-like store who was driving right by and we should follow them. We did, we found it. We just hadn't driven far enough -- in many different ways. Anyway, Poche's does do mail order (Poche's Market Website), but the shipping raises the prices considerably. However, many of their items were available already frozen. So we loaded up a box with tasso, andouille, chaurice, and stuffed deboned chickens (one with crawfish and one with shrimp). Packed full and stored in MM's ice chest until it could make it into the apt's freezer, hopefully the food won't defrost during transit.

Our dinner destination was unfortunately closed (they changed hours with daylight savings time ?!?) so we proceded to their recommended, Camille's, for some simple seafood. Jason's order of boiled shrimp was a cafeteria tray full of head on large shrimp with a deliciously spicy seasoning permeating the shell. I opted for charbroiled shrimp. Everything was good. Tired. Full. Sleepy. I slept most of the way home in the back seat, only waking up for the pointing out of the country's tallest state house and when we got off the highway back in NO. Thanks Brooks. We had a great time.

Wednesday. I have a cold. I'm crabby. No more New Orleans food, please. We go to Lemon Grass Vietnamese Restaurant for lunch. It's OK, the apps are better than the mains, I had a simple soup (udon in the pho?). Best part is that it is part of the International House hotel and there's a computer with a broadband connection in their lobby. Jason checks his email. I go back and sleep some more. On the recommendation of the blond-haired Jessica (Lemon Grass waitress) we check out Liborio's Cuban Restaurant for dinner. Talk about good! Best cuban ever. Even better than Versailles in Miami. Maybe we'll go back for lunch Friday before the plane. Amazing empanadas, fabulous cuban chicken soup, perfect black beans and rice, ropa vieja. Jason had some interesting sounding lobster stuffed flank steak. Mmm.

Thursday we went to Commanders Palace for lunch. Neither of us had ever been, we needed to go. It was quite good, but I don't feel obligated to return. My fish was very good, but the soup was perhaps a bit too thick. We had the bread pudding souffle as suggested, very good, but the fluffy version at Lagniappe Too in New Iberia was better.

So, that gets y'all up to date. While Jason worked on the computers, JoAnn brought me to a few stores to do some last minute shopping. We are about to go on to Mosca's for a big Italian farewell dinner. Signing off for now...

Rachel Perleaux

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Oh sure. Haul em all over God's creation and what happens? One little wrong turn (actually about 5, but who's counting? And we weren't lost, we just didn't know where we were. It IS NOT the same thing as being lost) and it ends up being read by millions of interested readers who will now never trust me to take them to Poche's Meats in Cecilia again. Like it's not in the middle of nowhere or anything. Auggghhhhhhhh :wacko:

Signing off to go buy a GPS

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Wow. It sounds like you had an adventure. Even if some of it was disapointing, it gives you a chance to one-up the next group of people you know who go to NOLA and don't make it out to the countryside.

Next time you are planning to go, give some more advance warning. If they are in season, I can have a crawfish boil set up and get you to some more out-of-the-way spots. But I'd be traveling from Birmingham.

And at least you've been to the real Cajun country now. And only the one tourist spot. The Tabasco factory is a unique institution, and you would have kicked yourself if you hadn't gone when you were so close, even though you found it too touristy. You still go to the French Quarter, right?

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Even the Hasidics make pretty good food in NOLA.

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You know you are in New Orleans when this is the view out your living room window (not joking!)

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Thanks for all the awesome reports, Jason. For those of us who can't get there, we are certainly enjoying our vicarious gastronomic tour of NOLA.

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eGulleteer "Beege" showing off her wares at the Bywater Art Market

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An artist at Bywater specializing in driftwood carvings

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Ginger Bread Loaves at Lejeunne Bakery in Jennerette, about 2 hours northwest of New Orleans

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Loaves fresh from the oven lat Lejeunne

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Mayhaw Man at Lejeunne Bakery

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Driving out to cajun country we saw miles upon miles of sugarcane fields, dotted with quite a few sugar procesessing plants. Here's some cane being made into sugar.

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I assure you that I am much thinner in person :shock: and that giant bag full of ughhhh......dietary bakery products.....were for someone else. :wink:

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I just got through eating a 1/2 of a boned chicken with shrimp stuffing gotten yesterday at Hebert's Meat Market in Maurice, LA. Wonderful. Everything that is right with this simple, yet delicious dish is basically what makes South Louisiana such a wonderful place to eat. Earthy, filling, spicy, easy, tasty. My little world at it's best.

So there. It was good and I love this place.

Here's some pictures of Hebert's for those of you reading along. Note that unlike Poche's they cannot ship or do any kind of mail order business because they do blood sausage. For those of you who live in the local area, please visit and indulge in their meats though.

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I'm heading to NOLA and environs in mid January.  Sure I'll be asking more later, but such great info in this thread that I've got a few top of mind questions.

Breakfast - No matter what objections are raised, I'm going to do Eggs Hussard at Brennan's one morning.  But where else for breakfast.  The Hummingbird is closed.  For me Cafe Du Mond and Morning Calls are for finishing off the evening as opposed to breakfast.  So where else to eat?

Oysters - Had my first-ever three dozen raw oysters at Felix's Oyster Bar way back when.  Is it still a good choice or other recommends?

Hot Dogs - Lucky dog of course.  Any corners better than others?  Any other dogs worth downing?

Where to stay?  Going to be spending some time at the convention center, but not sure that's where to stay.  I am one who, while appreciating grand hotels,  is loath to spend grand sums for the experience.

I have been going to Felix's every time I have been in New Orleans for about 25 years now (I'm a retired lawyer - and I used to argue cases in the appellate court there on a regular basis). Last time I was there was 2 years ago. Felix's always seems to stay the same - and I haven't been disappointed. It's like an old comfortable pair of shoes. Only problem is sometimes I think I'm out of my mind eating gulf oysters without a hepatitis shot (I live in North Florida and read too many articles about problems with the oyster beds).

One restaurant no one has mentioned is Dominque's in the French Quarter. We had our first meal there on our last trip. It is a "big deal" restaurant. It is not "world famous" - but it is excellent.

I have to add one note about the cooking in New Orleans. Just about every restaurant we went to (once we got away from raw oysters) used way way too much salt. I would wake up in the middle of the night dying of thirst and chug down a bottle of water. I live in the south - so I am not unused to too much salt - but I think New Orleans restauraurants set a record in my books. I think that using too much salt is the sign of a poor chef. There are so many interesting herbs and spices in the world other than salt - and - when I cook New Orleans style food - I manage to make tasty dishes without risking congestive heart failure. So why are most of the chefs in New Orleans so heavy with the salt shaker? This overuse of salt - among other things - is probably why the people in New Orleans are the unhealthiest people in the US.

Also - no one has mentioned the zoo in New Orleans. It is a world class zoo - and the ride to it on the trolley through the Garden District (particularly in the spring blooming season) isn't too shabby either. Robyn

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<<However, my most joyful portion of the visit was Acme Oyster on Iberville, off Bourbon St.>>

There are Acme people - and there are Felix's people. Think it depends on how you're stamped at birth. Robyn

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Wow. It sounds like you had an adventure. Even if some of it was disapointing, it gives you a chance to one-up the next group of people you know who go to NOLA and don't make it out to the countryside.

Next time you are planning to go, give some more advance warning. If they are in season, I can have a crawfish boil set up and get you to some more out-of-the-way spots. But I'd be traveling from Birmingham.

And at least you've been to the real Cajun country now. And only the one tourist spot. The Tabasco factory is a unique institution, and you would have kicked yourself if you hadn't gone when you were so close, even though you found it too touristy. You still go to the French Quarter, right?

My husband and I once stayed overnight in New Iberia. Instead of the normal chocolates on the bed - there were little bottles of tobasco sauce. You gotta love it :smile:.

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I just got through eating a 1/2 of a boned chicken with shrimp stuffing gotten yesterday at Hebert's Meat Market in Maurice, LA. Wonderful. Everything that is right with this simple, yet delicious dish is basically what makes South Louisiana such a wonderful place to eat. Earthy, filling, spicy, easy, tasty. My little world at it's best.

So there. It was good and I love this place.

Taking a page from Mayhaw Man, we cooked a Poche's deboned crawfish and rice stuffed chicken tonight, with pan roasted brussels sprouts and potatoes:

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It was yummy.

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Jason, Heberts does ship. Well, from a site in Tulsa:). I got so hungry reading your information that I ordered one online. Nice people. It's in my freezer now, awaiting Thanksgiving. Here's the website- http://hebertsmeats.com.

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NOTE: I've just temporarily removed the thread index and all the threads concerning the New Orleans trip in order to re-arrange them and add content. Stay tuned for updated versions in a few days.

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