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Parsnips


jeniac42
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I love parsnips for all of the reasons already stated. My favorite is just roasted or steamed, butter, s&p. The one thing that I haven't seen mentioned is that they have a somewhat unique texture or what I call "tooth". I don't know how to explain it other than they are somewhat starchier than carrots. (Same reason I like the Mexican "field" corn sold on the streets in Mexico vs. the insipid sweet stuff we get. But that is another story.)

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Yum, definitely. I never had parsnips as a child, but somewhere along the way I started putting parsnips in pot roast instead of potatoes. They add a nice zesty flavor.

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Treat parsnips as you would carrots. They're sweeter and more flavorful, but you can use them the same way you would carrots.

They cook quickly, so I add them late to braises and stews.

Smaller is better.

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How about WD-40 parsnips?  There's an interesting idea.  I'll shut up.

Had them on a tasting menu earlier in the week. Killed 8 guests. Didn't go over well. I'm certain WD-50's parsnips are far more successful.

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  • 10 months later...

Do you always have to cut the core out of Parsnips? I just finished making a short rib stew and plan on tossing roasted pearl onions, mushrooms, and parsnips in at the last minute.

They were on the smallish size - so I didn't cut the core out of them. But now I am having second thoughts. I've only cooked them before by running through a food mill and adding to mashed potatoes. So.. my question is when should one cut the core out of a parsnip.

thanks

johnjohn

Edited by johnjohn (log)
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I use parsnips frequently in soups and stews and have never cored them. (Up to about a 1.5 inch diameter at the top.)

The only soup, btw, I've found they don't work in is a classic cream potato soup. They just add a really nasty flavor.

SML

"When I grow up, I'm going to Bovine University!" --Ralph Wiggum

"I don't support the black arts: magic, fortune telling and oriental cookery." --Flanders

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My neighbor just gave me some freshly dug parsnips last week. I mashed them with roasted garlic one night (yummy!) and made shavings with a vegetable peeler and fried them in evoo for a few seconds. Even the kiddies loved this sweet treat.

It's just a matter of knowing how to prepare them. I even like the taste of them raw.

To eat good food is to be close to God." -Big Night

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.....

I enjoy mixing them up with some potatoes, onions, and carrots to roast along with a chicken.

Throw in some purple-top turnip, too.

we've been eating this all winter long.

the parsnips we find in the green grocer here aren't waxed and , since john will eat them, i use them whenever i can - parsnip and apple soup, carmelized mixed winter root veg with maple butter, mashed, dilled with carrots

course my friend michelle(from sheffield) who loves them whenever i make them for her is now married to a guy who hates just about any veg and won't try them ...period.

Edited by suzilightning (log)

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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I have tried to like them. ---- I really have. But they are the one vegetable that I can't take.

My dear mother tried her best to find a way to make them -- mashed, candied, fried --- but there was something about the taste that just got to me.

So I'm an 'ick' ------but I must say that some of the ways to prepare them, in this thread, are intriguing!

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The best parsnips I have ever had were at a restaurant here in DC. They were sliced lengthwise and fried in evoo. A little bit of salt, a little bit of chopped fresh parsley. yummmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.

It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,

but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

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I like them, but have to be in the mood for them. I've heard people describe them as tasting carroty; I don't get this. Maybe carrots dredged in baking spices, but not carrots.

In December, I had a sample of parsnip and pear soup from Central Market in Austin. It was one of the best things that I've ever put in my gob. Unfortunately, all I had was a measly sample -- they kept selling out.

I also like them roasted with other root vegetables -- potatoes, sweet potatoes, turnips, rutabegas, leeks, onions, carrots, garlic cloves. Dice; toss in EVOO, salt, pepper, thyme, and paprika; roast until they're all tender.

amanda

Googlista

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Ick.

Anything that intensifies the taste of the parsnip, I can't stand.

Simmer slowly in cream, prefereably in a low oven. Strain and blend in the food processor or food mill. Add roasted garlic, S&P and a touch nutmeg and you're in business.

Chips are acceptable too. Salt can save a lot of things... ; )

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In December, I had a sample of parsnip and pear soup from Central Market in Austin. It was one of the best things that I've ever put in my gob. Unfortunately, all I had was a measly sample -- they kept selling out.

I am curious to hear more of this soup...was it a pureed soup? Chicken based? I need answers here!!!

"Make me some mignardises, &*%$@!" -Mateo

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I'm in the "I like parsnips" camp. Thick julienne, then into a bowl with cooking oil (olive is fine), S & P, then tossed onto a baking pan and baked/broiled utnil crispy, I stir once or twice with a wooden spoon. Even our children will eat these. I'm told that one or two parsnips are essential to 'real' Jewish chicken soup, but I'm not an expert there. I also like half and half parnsips and potatoes mashed, they are divine. At present we have at least 6000 pounds of parnsips waiting to be harvested and eaten, so I'm obliged to like them! Parsnip tops are never to be eaten, unlike many root vegetables (such as beets and turnips and radishes) where we should eat the fresh greens. We only sell them at farmers market and through a csa program so we never wax them. -chardgirl

Parsnips for sale at the farmers market

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