Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
Adam Balic

Wine and Cheese

Recommended Posts

we had only four cheeses and two wines, as it was part of a 5-course meal:

french matured goat (well balanced)

brie de meaux (not the best i've had, too dried out)

muenster (rich without being over-ripe, very good)

gorgonzola (one of the best i've had)

tricastin (dryish, lots of tannin)

amarone (not of the over-sweet kind)

i've had both good port/lustau and sweet whites with cheese at other times and never liked it, but i'll have to admit that the amarone was the best choice for every one of the cheeses we tried.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oraklet - when you say "Lustau", which sheery do you mean? Lustau is a sherry producer/distributer and their products range from bone-dry flinty Finos to rich/sweet PX's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'JOSEPH RIESLING-TRAMINER SOUTH AUSTRALIA LA MAGIA, 1998' - that sounded interesting - did it turn out less so?

I've never thought much about specific cheese/wine combinations but could be motivated to do so. Could you (and any others) be interested in a similar event when you are in London some time, making use of lessons learnt at this tasting and (subjectively speaking) without the competitive element? Don't know how you combine it with Bellinis though.

By the way, not very a propos, I was involved in some rather detailed sampling of British & Irish cheeses a couple of years ago. The list of best cheeses we came up with at the time still lurks in my filofax:

Mine Gubhar

Flower Marie

Wigmore

Wellington

Finn

Ragstone

Durrus

Montgomery Cheddar

Little Ryding

Colston Bassett Stilton

Gorwydd Cheshire

Smarts Single Gloucester

Stinking Bishop

Mrs Bell's Blue

Ardrahan

Skirrid (?) (don't know what the ? means)

Martell's Gloucester

Brecon Blue

Cilowen

Burland Green

John Bourne blue Cheshire

Rustic Sharpham

v

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oraklet - when you say "Lustau", which sheery do you mean? Lustau is a sherry producer/distributer  and their products range from bone-dry flinty Finos to rich/sweet PX's.

the lustau i've had with cheese was rich/sweet. very nice, actually, but not for cheese!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
'JOSEPH RIESLING-TRAMINER SOUTH AUSTRALIA LA MAGIA, 1998' - that sounded interesting - did it turn out less so?

Actually, the wine was vey good, better them my wife's (which was also an Australian botrytis sticky), as it had more acid/sugar balance. However, her Roquforte blew my Lanark Blue out of the water.

p.s. Bought my wine in Harvey Nicks, if you are interested in trying it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oraklet - when you say "Lustau", which sheery do you mean? Lustau is a sherry producer/distributer  and their products range from bone-dry flinty Finos to rich/sweet PX's.

the lustau i've had with cheese was rich/sweet. very nice, actually, but not for cheese!

You forgot to add 'In my opinion'. :wink:

Sounds like you had a PX, which may be to sweet for many cheeses.

I dunno, these people and their sweeping generalizations about food and wine matching, without reference to the type of wine they where drinking or the type of Cheese they were referring to. :raz: Tourists.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never thought much about specific cheese/wine combinations but could be motivated to do so.  Could you (and any others) be interested in a similar event when you are in London some time, making use of lessons learnt at this tasting and (subjectively speaking) without the competitive element?  Don't know how you combine it with Bellinis though.

By the way, not very a propos, I was involved in some rather detailed sampling of British & Irish cheeses a couple of years ago.  The list of best cheeses we came up with at the time still lurks in my filofax:

Mine Gubhar

Flower Marie

Wigmore

Wellington

Finn

Ragstone

Durrus

Montgomery Cheddar

Little Ryding

Colston Bassett Stilton

Gorwydd Cheshire

Smarts Single Gloucester

Stinking Bishop

Mrs Bell's Blue

Ardrahan

Skirrid (?) (don't know what the ? means)

Martell's Gloucester

Brecon Blue

Cilowen

Burland Green

John Bourne blue Cheshire

Rustic Sharpham

v

I think that a cheese/wine thing in London would be an interesting exercise, depending on what people though.

Vanessa - that is a lot of cheese. Considering how I felt after eating 14 cheeses, the mind boggles at how you felt after that load. Interesting cheese though. I would like to try 'Stinking Bishop', as I enjoy stinky, wash rined cheeses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Montrachet, Brut Champagne.

Brie, Chenin Blanc.

Pont-l'Evequê, Barbaresco.

Agree, disagree?

Your pairings are excellent. In fact it was also recommended in Gourmet? Food & Wine? I forget which magazine but I used the same pairings for a wine and cheese party I held for my collegues for a pre-Christmas do. I highly recommend these choices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think that a cheese/wine thing in London would be an interesting exercise, depending on what people though.

sounds good to me. We could turn at at Neals Yard with a dozen bottles of wine and take over the shop!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

However, her Roquforte blew my Lanark Blue out of the water.

p.s. Bought my wine in Harvey Nicks, if you are interested in trying it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

However, her Roquforte blew my Lanark Blue out of the water.

p.s. Bought my wine in Harvey Nicks, if you are interested in trying it.

You will notice that the Lanark Blue didn't get into our top cheese list. In fact, if I remember rightly, it didn't get anywhere near.

I'm very boring and only buy wine I don't have to carry home: from The Wine Society and bbr.com, but will keep an eye out for the riesling/traminer combo.

v

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure Wilfrid sure. We just all need to agree on the cheese/wine to be tasted. Should take, er, five or six months to organise this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like it might take a while to decide. So, if you're comfortable waiting until I deliver in September, count me in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife took me to La Toque in Rutherford for my birthday dinner. It was a surprise and if I'd known where we were going I wouldn't have bothered to bring my own wine. For an additional $50 buck you can have a specially selected wine with each course. Next time I'll try that. I brought along an '86 BV la’tour and it was wonderful and worked with everything that I ordered.

Before the desert course they offered an optional cheese course. All cheeses I'd never heard of. We selected the Mimolette and its caramel after taste seemed to go nicely with the Cab I brought.

A few weeks later I found the Mimolette at Dean and Delucca in St. Helena. I've now tasted it with Cab, Zin and a great little Bordeaux from Ramian Estate.

I was just wondering what was everyone's favorite wine and cheese pairing?

I’ve got to get back to Dean and Delucca’s for more Mimolette…


Edited by WineMiles (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although this seems shamefully obvious, there's a reason that these are classics:

Port & Stilton

Sancerre and Chevre

Rioja Crianza and Manchego

Pinot Grigio and fresh Mozzarella

Riesling and Muenster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even more basic than Katie's pairings, mine are:

Brie and Cabernet or a Beaujolais

Port Salut and Chinon

Emmenthaler and Cotes du Rhone

Bucheron and Sauvignon Blanc

Italian Taleggio and Port

Edited: for memory issues :unsure:


Edited by Gifted Gourmet (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And some of my consistent favorites:

Bucheron and Sauterne

Parrano and Merlot

Cumin-laden Gruyere and Gewurtztraminer (okay, that a new fav! and a darned good one!)

Any hard, aged, salty cheese (I like aged Vella Jack) and Zinfandel

I've gotten to a point, in my old age, that when dining at fancy-schamncy restaurants, I prefer an assorted cheese plate with lots of contrasting flavors, paired with a sweet, white wine; a late harvest Riesling, a Sauterne, anything Botrysied, an Ice Wine... Sometimes a port will do, but I like the cloying sweetness that comes in a cold, white sweet wine vs. the warmth of a port when a really hefty cheese hits the palate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Curious what people think would go well with a Reblochon? (Just had a nice example sans wine)

(I've had the chevre/Sancerre combo and was surprised at how good it was--know that it is a "classic" but it wasn't an intuitive match to me beforehand).

Also like Parmigiano Reggiano with cabernet sauvignon.


Edited by ludja (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Curious what people think would go well with a Reblochon? .

Perhaps a Chardonnay or Bordeaux White or even a Semillon?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also like Parmigiano Reggiano with cabernet sauvignon.

Try a nice piece of aged Parmigiano Reggiano with some really high quality aged Balsamic vinegar (old enough to be really viscous and concentrated - I use a 20 year old) drizzled on it. :wub: :wub: This is truly one of the most delicious things EVER.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pedro Ximenez Sherry and Cabrales/Valdeon

Oh yum. Thank you for that. :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Curious what people think would go well with a Reblochon? (Just had a nice example sans wine)

Something lighter in weight, fruity and red like a cru Beaujolais, or perhaps even a not-too-weighty red Burgundy. For a white, you'd be safest pairing with something regionally similar like a Chasselas if you could locate it, or dry riesling or something sparkling like a Blanquette de Limoux.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also like Parmigiano Reggiano with cabernet sauvignon.

Try a nice piece of aged Parmigiano Reggiano with some really high quality aged Balsamic vinegar (old enough to be really viscous and concentrated - I use a 20 year old) drizzled on it. :wub: :wub: This is truly one of the most delicious things EVER.

Oh yes! I am with you on that... Divine!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×