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okay, it's spelled many ways.  that's not the point here....

I'm working on the perfect sauce/cooking liquid/+other things combo for a delectable dish.  
I don't have problems with the meat - I can get good shanks, browned nicely, they come out tender and tasty.

it's the in-pot accompaniments that disappoint.  I done multiple versions of 'trinity,' tried tomato based/adds, tried various seasonings.  I've served it with rice, pasta, barley, faro as the 'side reinforcement.'

there was a little resto in North Henderson / Patrick Lane(?) that did "my ideal" knock-em-dead version, I've never been able to duplicate the taste.

anyone have a super-version?  am I missing some magic spicing classic to the real Italian deal?

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Mine is a bit odd but we loved it over and again.  Gremolata is nice but we usually did not.  I had a thing for cream sherry back then. Adds a roundness.nas does the tomato paste.

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that looks neat!  several adds I've not come across.

thanks!

 

btw, I knew it has to be good, just from the card stock.....

 

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4 minutes ago, AlaMoi said:

that looks neat!  several adds I've not come across.

thanks!

 

btw, I knew it has to be good, just from the card stock.....

 

 

I mentioned before elsewhere here that my husband bought them for me so I would stop keeping the "keepers" in my head only. I like your penmanship style. Mine is also not classic US

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we have launch - osso bucco tomorrow.

for long braises with tougher cuts, I very much like to do a two day prep.  the first the usual cook, then cool, refrigerate overnight, then a gentle reheat.  that really breaks down the collagen....

 

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half time report . . .

browning went well, sweating went well, 3 hr braise went well . . . .

refrigerator did it's thing . . .

may not be obvious, but I forked off some bits from the small shank for tasting. 

stunning.  stunning I say!

while most of it is 'the usual suspects' - I'd venture to say the crushed red pepper flakes and sherry are what put your recipe to the far side of the moon.

used pinot grigio for the white wine - the 'dryness/acidity' methinks offsets the buttery cream sherry "just right"

my plan is to re-warm, strain out the sauce, add diced mushroom for the spaetzle and ?? green veg.

do you strain the braise liquid or use it 'as is'?

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Pretty sure I did not strain as I am not a "smooth" sauce person care.  Hope you enjoy We did tartly dressed salad after as the palate cleanser and no extra vegetable with the main. 

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your recipe is a gem!  this came out absolutely spectacular.  many thanks - I've been after a good recipe for a long time.

the gelatin developed perfectly - here's the chilled pot

 

typically the veggies are pretty shopworn after a long braise so I did strain the sauce, then added / cooked down some crimini while the sauce reduced.

 

and spaetzle to fill out the dish....

 

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PS: nice looking Spaezle - I don't like the ones that are small like a rice kernel - what is the point then - orzo would be at least chewy. 

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Posted (edited)

I think I  have probably tried everything ever invented labelled for "spaetzle"

the best thing every found - saw it on an Emeril episode!

 

this is cited as never available in retail stores - reasons tend to the obvious....

and can be difficult to find on-line.

but it is the best tool for the job....

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Edited by AlaMoi (log)
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Lecker means really delicious (mouth licking). I told my Austrian born step mom and she said the one a friend sent from Austria was the slider kind but it rusted (they over clean)  It was like this. Interesting. I would only do it for a dinner party friend thing.  Funny how other countries use English words as a cool thing - esp Japan. Well when we were cool...   

993477_s.jpg?sw=1350&sh=1000&sm=fit

Edited by heidih (log)
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2 hours ago, AlaMoi said:

I think I  have probably tried everything ever invented labelled for "spaetzle"

the best thing every found - saw it on an Emeril episode!

 

this is cited as never available in retail stores - reasons tend to the obvious....

and can be difficult to find on-line.

but it is the best tool for the job....

spplate.jpg

 

Mine is similar but made of plastic, and is correspondingly a bit thicker. I suspect the steel one would be easier to clean, afterwards.

“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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6 hours ago, heidih said:

Lecker means really delicious (mouth licking). I told my Austrian born step mom and she said the one a friend sent from Austria was the slider kind but it rusted (they over clean)  It was like this. Interesting. I would only do it for a dinner party friend thing.  Funny how other countries use English words as a cool thing - esp Japan. Well when we were cool...   

993477_s.jpg?sw=1350&sh=1000&sm=fit

 

This my go to, my dinner party secret weapon, and my, "why not just for us" tool.    I have one in the city, one in the country, have given one to son.   And actually, have passed on at least a half dozen more.    I buy them for a dollar at garage sales (after trying to convince the seller of their utility) and hand them out at dinner parties when guests go gaga over spaetzle.    SO simple and the perfect "sop" for all good sauces!   

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eGullet member #80.

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2 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

This my go to, my dinner party secret weapon, and my, "why not just for us" tool.    I have one in the city, one in the country, have given one to son.   And actually, have passed on at least a half dozen more.    I buy them for a dollar at garage sales (after trying to convince the seller of their utility) and hand them out at dinner parties when guests go gaga over spaetzle.    SO simple and the perfect "sop" for all good sauces!   

Confession time. I bought a tool like this in the fun and rush of an evening's cooking class. 2 years later, I have yet to use it. Perhaps we need a spätzle topic, with tutorial? Please help me justify this purchase. I love the sound of "SO simple and the perface "sop" for all good sauces!"

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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1 minute ago, Smithy said:

Confession time. I bought a tool like this in the fun and rush of an evening's cooking class. 2 years later, I have yet to use it. Perhaps we need a spätzle topic, with tutorial? Please help me justify this purchase. I love the sound of "SO simple and the perface "sop" for all good sauces!"

I fool you not.    You really can't go wrong.    I just dump some flour in a small bowl, about a cup, add a beaten egg and some salt, beat together, add water to make a batter similar to pancakes.    Bring a pot of water to boil.   Set your gismo over the pot, dump the batter into the gismo's cup and repeatedly slide the cup over the pierced frame.    Maybe have to add batter again.    It is all cooked in a minute or two   Drain and wow your guests.     Of course, there are proper recipes, and you can sex up the batter with herbs or veg purees (beet or spinach), but even the simplest formulas are divine.    So...find your guilty purchase and ENJOY!  

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eGullet member #80.

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Yes dead simple batter. Do add ins after and then there is the whole saute in butter thing with the cooked guys. . 

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Posted (edited)

I've had 'masher' type thingies, I've had sliders - threw the square cup thing away and used a spatula to squeeze the batter through....

I have the quisi-pro ricer - that works with the biggest hole plate - but it's a pita to use (small volume per pass) and a mess to clean-up.

 

the batter/dough is indeed dead simple - but the resulting size & shape depends on how 'thick' it is.  if it's too thin it basically drizzles into the water in strings - I prefer the cheese doodle style.  however, there's recipes with eggs, or milk, or cream, and combos, and cheese

 

then,,,, there's the Black Forest version - using a flat edge, create a thin layer on a board/plate and chop off thin strips into the pot.

 

 

Edited by AlaMoi (log)
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