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SilverstoneBakehouse

Coloured cocoa butter technique advice

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Hello, my name is Matthew and ever since university I've been working with racing cars but am now looking to start making filled bonbons to finally scratch an itch that has just never gone away since I first successfully tempered a batch of chocolate.

 

I recently commissioned the creation of some custom moulds, shaped like racing helmets, with a view to supplying my filled bonbon creations to racing teams, as potential gifts for sponsors and hospitality guests. I plan to emulate some classic helmet designs (like Senna's helmet for my caramel) and also offer customisation, for any drivers who want the chocolates to resemble their own helmet designs.

 

The custom moulds will be produced in 40 shore silicone (FDA approved), with each mould weighing 2KG, sized somewhere around 250mm square and including 20 helmet cavities. I have also purchased a Chocovision Rev2, tabletop vibrating platform, airbrush and loads of other odds and sods to assist in the process. 

 

I won't receive the moulds until later this week (hopefully) but have been doing loads of practicing and research into how I could utlilise coloured cocoa butter to create various effects on the finished product. Does anyone know of any books that are filled with graphical explanations of this, something along the lines of "by using X tool and Y technique, you can produce Z result"?

 

My main concern is that the moulds will be difficult to decorate due to the limited accessibility of the cavity (my own fault I guess). Unlike a sphere mould where you can pipe straight lines easily, with helmet shaped cavities its a much more complex and time consuming process. I have included a couple of photos of a test helmet I cast last week. Please note that I gave little thought to the decoration of this piece, it was really just to test out whether 40 shore silicone would be too stiff for removal of the chocolate from the mould.

 

I would appreciate any advice you are able and willing to provide, as I embark on this new adventure.

 

Thanks

 

Matthew

 

ChocHelmet1.jpg

ChocHelmet2.jpg

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Posted (edited)

I have tried using silicone molds for chocolates and it has never been successful, except for solid pieces. I prefer rigid polycarbonate molds. The silicone ones are always too flexible and do not seem to have smooth enough surfaces. I only use them for moist baked goods like cheesecake.

 


Edited by Lisa Shock (log)

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Trouble with silicone molds - they retain the heat - it's difficult to get a good shine on the surface and filling them is a bitch (because dumping them out to make shells is very difficult. 

 

Have a read thought the Chocolates with that Showroom Finish threads to start re decorating.

 

 

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As has been said - silicon won't serve you well. But you can pipe your ganache into them, freeze them, pop them out and then enrobe or dip them. Not ideal, but it would work.

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Cheers for all the feedback regarding my choice of material for the mould. I went with Silicone due to the return angles at the bottom of racing helmet designs. I guess I could have gone for a two part polycarbonate mould (bottom section = most of helmet, top section = return angle section) a bit like how you mould truffle spheres, but I chose to go the silicone route. Oh well, its done now and the expensive master moulds have already been cast. Let's see how they turn out.

 

Cheers for the "showroom finish" thread suggestion Kerry, I'll check that out. 

 

Matthew

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17 minutes ago, SilverstoneBakehouse said:

Cheers for all the feedback regarding my choice of material for the mould. I went with Silicone due to the return angles at the bottom of racing helmet designs. I guess I could have gone for a two part polycarbonate mould (bottom section = most of helmet, top section = return angle section) a bit like how you mould truffle spheres, but I chose to go the silicone route. Oh well, its done now and the expensive master moulds have already been cast. Let's see how they turn out.

 

Cheers for the "showroom finish" thread suggestion Kerry, I'll check that out. 

 

Matthew

I was picturing a two piece polycarbonate for that design when I saw it. I suppose you see how it goes. What are the master molds made from - perhaps they could be repurposed for polycarbonate when the time comes?

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How does one polish a silicone mold?  Silicone that I've used for chocolate truffles and mendiants still has a cocoa butter film years later, despite repeated washings.  You might be better off hand-painting them after un-molding.

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4 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

How does one polish a silicone mold?  Silicone that I've used for chocolate truffles and mendiants still has a cocoa butter film years later, despite repeated washings.  You might be better off hand-painting them after un-molding.

A very valid question and one I need to get to the bottom of. I know you need to clean the silicone moulds after every use with hot water (as hot as you can stand) plus some grease cutting soap. This should get rid of any remaining cocoa butter, but as for polishing, I'm not too sure as its surface will be too sticky for cotton pads, leaving fibers behind....

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7 hours ago, SilverstoneBakehouse said:

A very valid question and one I need to get to the bottom of. I know you need to clean the silicone moulds after every use with hot water (as hot as you can stand) plus some grease cutting soap. This should get rid of any remaining cocoa butter, but as for polishing, I'm not too sure as its surface will be too sticky for cotton pads, leaving fibers behind....

And does it actually polish?

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The master for my racing helmet silicone mould is almost complete (see attached) but I'm still struggling to find any information on how to effectively polish silicone moulds. 

 

I realise that most all professionals use polycarb, but if anyone does have any advice or suggestions of how to achieve this, it would be appreciated.


matthew 

WP_20180618_005.jpg

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On 6/11/2018 at 11:15 AM, SilverstoneBakehouse said:

Hello, my name is Matthew and ever since university I've been working with racing cars but am now looking to start making filled bonbons to finally scratch an itch that has just never gone away since I first successfully tempered a batch of chocolate.

 

I recently commissioned the creation of some custom moulds, shaped like racing helmets, with a view to supplying my filled bonbon creations to racing teams, as potential gifts for sponsors and hospitality guests. I plan to emulate some classic helmet designs (like Senna's helmet for my caramel) and also offer customisation, for any drivers who want the chocolates to resemble their own helmet designs.

 

The custom moulds will be produced in 40 shore silicone (FDA approved), with each mould weighing 2KG, sized somewhere around 250mm square and including 20 helmet cavities. I have also purchased a Chocovision Rev2, tabletop vibrating platform, airbrush and loads of other odds and sods to assist in the process. 

 

I won't receive the moulds until later this week (hopefully) but have been doing loads of practicing and research into how I could utlilise coloured cocoa butter to create various effects on the finished product. Does anyone know of any books that are filled with graphical explanations of this, something along the lines of "by using X tool and Y technique, you can produce Z result"?

 

My main concern is that the moulds will be difficult to decorate due to the limited accessibility of the cavity (my own fault I guess). Unlike a sphere mould where you can pipe straight lines easily, with helmet shaped cavities its a much more complex and time consuming process. I have included a couple of photos of a test helmet I cast last week. Please note that I gave little thought to the decoration of this piece, it was really just to test out whether 40 shore silicone would be too stiff for removal of the chocolate from the mould.

 

I would appreciate any advice you are able and willing to provide, as I embark on this new adventure.

 

Thanks

 

Matthew

 

ChocHelmet1.jpg

ChocHelmet2.jpg

HI, 

where can i buy this mold?

jamal

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6 hours ago, Jamal12 said:

HI, 

where can i buy this mold?

jamal


Read through the post again... you can't buy it, he had it custom made.

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16 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:


Read through the post again... you can't buy it, he had it custom made.

 Yes i know he had it custom made but is he commercialising it , where can it be found?

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6 hours ago, Jamal12 said:

 Yes i know he had it custom made but is he commercialising it , where can it be found?


Le sigh... when I get to the bottom I go back to the top of the slide...

They can't be found, he had them custom made for his personal use. I suppose you could possibly arrange through him with the company that made them to have a run made for you if he was feeling generous at that moment but other than that, you'd have to go through the same process he did and get something similar made for yourself. 

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Hey Guys,

 

Sorry to see that this conversation has gone on for so long with no input from my side, I was busy attending the UK Callebaut Chocolate Academy. 

 

If I was to supply my custom moulds to anyone else, I would charge a minimum of £250 per mould and set a minimum order quantity of 4pcs. It's expensive I know, but so were the tooling costs. 

 

Matthew

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1 minute ago, SilverstoneBakehouse said:

Just incase anyone was interested, this is the finish I have been able to achieve with my custom silicone mould. 

IMG_8268.jpg

Looks good - can't wait to see how it goes with the colours. 

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Yep, that's what all of my energy, effort and focus is on right now. Experimenting with combinations of artists masking tape, the dremel and removable inserts are all planned for the next few days. Now that I know a good technique for tempering very small amounts of coloured cocoa butter before applying it, it should help. 

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good luck! Did anyone at the Callebaut Academy have any good ideas about cleaning your silicon moulds?

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3 minutes ago, keychris said:

good luck! Did anyone at the Callebaut Academy have any good ideas about cleaning your silicon moulds?

 

Alcohol, elbow grease and a microfibre cloth. 

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What kind of silicone are you using? Feels like it needs to be kind of hard? 

 

The silicone I use to make moulds is 28 shore, feels a little bit too soft to use for chocolate moulds. But maybe I'm wrong. :) 

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5 minutes ago, Rajala said:

What kind of silicone are you using? Feels like it needs to be kind of hard? 

 

The silicone I use to make moulds is 28 shore, feels a little bit too soft to use for chocolate moulds. But maybe I'm wrong. :) 

 

This mould has been made with 40 shore silicone, which is as hard as I was willing to go. any harder and I would have struggled with removal of the product.

 

As you can see, the end result does have a shine but it is a matt shine.

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On 7/16/2018 at 3:08 PM, SilverstoneBakehouse said:

Hey Guys,

 

Sorry to see that this conversation has gone on for so long with no input from my side, I was busy attending the UK Callebaut Chocolate Academy. 

 

If I was to supply my custom moulds to anyone else, I would charge a minimum of £250 per mould and set a minimum order quantity of 4pcs. It's expensive I know, but so were the tooling costs. 

 

Matthew

 

sorry but i will pass on that price, good luck anyway.

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