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Polycarbonate Molds: Sources, Selection, Use, Care


Patrick S
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I usually soak mine in hot water, no soap, and use a dish brush on the back and sides (I'm neater than when I started but still get a bit on the rest of the mold) the mold cavities just get a quick swish with my fingers and I rub the top face down with my hand as well. I then dry the face and sides with a tea towel. Then the cavities get dried/polished with a cloth diaper. Then I set them cavity-side down to air dry the back. Works great, takes a little time.

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And I can't find a cube/square at all.

Any sources/ideas?

I've looked through the threads on making my own molds using silicone, and that might be a possibility.  Anybody have any experiences to share with doing filled chocolate pieces in silicone molds?

I found a really nice cube mold at a plastics store. It is actually an acrylic lipstick tube holder for makeup counters and it has very straight-up-and-down sides. There is zero space to grip if you want to empty it out but makes nice 1" cubes.

It is at work so I can't send you a pic until Wenesday... but this is pretty much what it is.

lipstick holder

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  • 1 year later...

This is my first post--I have been reading for months. Thanks to all of you for your great posts and information. I only hope that I can contribute something as we go along. FedEx just dropped off a box from Chocolat-chocolat. Inside is a Made in China Poly carbonate mold of a flattish cacoa bean. I didn't order it, and there is no invoice. I received a large order of molds last week, and thought perhaps this was a back-order, but it isn't. I wonder if they are testing the China molds? It is clear with 32 impressions and looks like the European molds I have. Did anyone else receive one?

Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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For the last year when I do larger orders they tend to put a Chinese mould in my order. I have received the guitar mould and the Olympic bar mould. I don't think the chinese moulds are as good as the European made ones. They tend to be heavier and the thermal cooling in the plastic is problematic at times.

My favourite moulds are the Cocoa Barry.

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For the last year when I do larger orders they tend to put a Chinese mould in my order. I have received the guitar mould and the Olympic bar mould.  I don't think the chinese moulds are as good as the European made ones. They tend to be heavier and the thermal cooling in the plastic is problematic at times.

My favourite moulds are the Cocoa Barry.

How large is a large order? I just got four moulds and some transfer sheets about a month ago, but I didn't get any freebie. :sad:

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

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I just dug deeper and found an envelope with a nice note. They thanked me for mentioning their name on my blog, and sent the mold as a thank you! I think I will mention them again :biggrin:

Ruth

Edited by Chocolot (log)

Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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I just dug deeper and found an envelop with a nice note.  They thanked me for mentioning their name on my blog, and sent the mold as a thank you!  I think I will mention them again :biggrin:

Ruth

That means they are reading. Chocolat-Chocolat

Chocolat-Chocolat

Chocolat-Chocolat

Chocolat-Chocolat!

M address is 500 Sierra Vista APT103 las vegas nevada 89169. I like geometric shapes mostly, and organic figures as well as guitar cutters and anything that plugs in.

thanks.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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Chocolat-chocolat often has promotions as well, and will include free molds.

I've not been disappointed with the chinese molds. I find they seems to work just as well as the french, dutch or belgian molds I have used.

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I have used them a few times in the past and they really are a pleasure to deal with and are super helpful when you meet them at trade shows. They usually have a booth at the NY Fancy Food Show, coming up at the end of this month

"Chocolate has no calories....

Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence

SWEET KARMA DESSERTS

www.sweetkarmadesserts.com

550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554

516-794-4478

Brian Fishman

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  • 4 months later...

We do a lot of molded chocolates and one of my least favorite things is cleaning the molds. We don't wash them as I don't want hard water spots. Our normal process is to heat up the mold with a hair dryer and clean it with paper towels and polish with cotton. Some days we have 75-100 molds and it takes a lot of time and doesn't seem very efficient. Just wondering if anyone had found a faster way to clean them.

We could wash them in hot water and then polish with cocoa butter but I'm sure someone must have a faster and better solution. Thanks. Bill

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I think it depends on the water in your area. Paris has high calcium in the water; Portland, not so much.

Like Kerry, I wash in hot water with a tiny bit of dish liquid, then allow to air dry. Afterwards, I have to polish with a cotton cloth.

TG, Paper towels? Doesn't that scratch them?

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I am far from experienced, but I found two things that work for me. First, don't make too big a mess to begin with and you have less to clean up :biggrin: Second, I use cotton terry towels instead of paper. I hit the molds with a hair dryer and just wipe off/out the chocolate. In class, they told us to never wash them.

Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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I have been using some of my molds for over 10 years and they are in excellent shape. I inquired years ago about how to clean them. I think Callebaut in Quebec said to put them in the dishwasher. I have always done that. I don't allow the molds to dry. I dry with soft cotton dish towels. I do not use fabric softener for my dish towels. Anyhow, my molds are as good today as when I purchased them.

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From JB Prince (where I bought my molds):

These chocolate molds are made from food safe rigid polycarbonate plastic.  They are durable, will not bend, and have highly detailed designs.

Before use, these molds should be carefully cleaned in warm or hot water with mild soap.  DO NOT USE A DETERGENT OR SOAP THAT CONTAINS ABRASIVES.

It is possible to put these molds in a dishwasher – even a commercial one, BUT DO NOT USE DISHWASHER DETERGENT.  It contains abrasives that will scratch the plastic.

After washing, the molds can be dried with a soft, lint free cloth or cotton balls.

Thank you for buying from the J.B. Prince Company.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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a combination of above

1. like Ruth, don't get them too dirty in the first place and your job is easier.

2. Like John and Kerry, warm water

3. Like Prariegirl and Ruth, I use old tshirts to dry and polish at the same time. Sometimes I'll get a little bit of colored cocoa butter on the tshirt, so I prefer to clean over not to clean.

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I think it depends on the water in your area.  Paris has high calcium in the water; Portland, not so much.

Like Kerry, I wash in hot water with a tiny bit of dish liquid, then allow to air dry. Afterwards, I have to polish with a cotton cloth.

TG, Paper towels?  Doesn't that scratch them?

I don't have any scratches on the molds from paper towels. We only wash the molds when ganache breaks through a shell. I've thought about just washing them in hot water and then polishing. Sounds like that works pretty well for everyone. We really only have chocolate on the outside of the mold so it is just cleaning that area up. Hot water may be the best timesaver but I'll keep checking to see what else turns up.

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From JB Prince (where I bought my molds):
These chocolate molds are made from food safe rigid polycarbonate plastic.  They are durable, will not bend, and have highly detailed designs.

Before use, these molds should be carefully cleaned in warm or hot water with mild soap.  DO NOT USE A DETERGENT OR SOAP THAT CONTAINS ABRASIVES.

It is possible to put these molds in a dishwasher – even a commercial one, BUT DO NOT USE DISHWASHER DETERGENT.  It contains abrasives that will scratch the plastic.

After washing, the molds can be dried with a soft, lint free cloth or cotton balls.

Thank you for buying from the J.B. Prince Company.

That's exactly what I do. Works great.

B. Keith Ryder

BCakes by BKeith

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I'm a messy, messy chocolatier, so I tend to wash my molds regularly. Just spray down with hot hot water, then dry with cotton. But the idea of using a warm oven or hair dryer to heat the excess chocolate and just wiping it off is kind of revolutionary for me. I hate cleaning molds, so perhaps I'll try that next time!

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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