• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
porpoise_oil

Diastatic Malt Powder in Australia

9 posts in this topic

Hi everyone,

I've just been watching the latest Modernist Cuisine video for potato puree (I think this recipe is in MC@H as well). They suggest using diastatic malt powder since it acts as an enzyme that can break down the potato starch into a smooth puree.

Does anyone know of anywhere one can purchase diastatic malt powder in Australia (preferably Melbourne)?

From the recipe (linked above) it suggests that it can be purchased at baking and brewing supply stores, but I've tried a few and none of them seem to sell it - they only sell varieties of non-diastatic malt powder. The closest I've found is this company, but they sell it pre-mixed with flour for baking purposes so I don't think this would work very well! I've tried my usual places (MFCD, The Red Spoon Company, Chef's Armoury) but they don't have it listed - at least not as 'diastatic malt powder'.

Thanks in advance,

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

contact the company you list, and ask them if they will sell you powder without blending it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can buy it here. Only problem is the package size, which is 22.65kg.


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sent an email to a friend of mine who works in the starch industry. He said that his company does not stock it. He suggested you try a beer brewing supplier. Apparently they use diastatic malt to help yeast ferment malt as well.

(edit) It only costs $9.32 to buy from Amazon.


Edited by Keith_W (log)

There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sent an email to a friend of mine who works in the starch industry. He said that his company does not stock it. He suggested you try a beer brewing supplier. Apparently they use diastatic malt to help yeast ferment malt as well.

(edit) It only costs $9.32 to buy from Amazon.

Just checked and they won't ship that product to Australia, sadly. I have the same problem as the OP. The search continues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If all else fails, we could split up the 22.65kg bag that nickrey suggested. I'm happy to take 2kg.


There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,

Thanks very much for your help! I got in touch with Basic Ingredients, and even though they don't list it on their website they were able to sell me 200g for $5.50 + postage to Melbourne of $3.00. So that was pretty easy - it took a few days for them to get back to me but once they did, they sent it almost immediately and I received it yesterday.

Keith_W - thanks for your offer about splitting the bag, that was going to be my next choice if I couldn't get a small quantity!

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The mixing bowl - 2 locations in Melbourne (search on Google go to ingredients price list on their site, I live near by. So I picked it up, I'm guessing they would courier though).

I bought 200g for about $3. Made the visychoisse it was very nice. Though I'd have to do a blind test to see how much better than normal.

Btw creme brulee texture using rice cooker with PID as a bain marie from MCAH was wonderful & easy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Basic Ingredient now charge a minimum of $15 domestic postage!!! Even for small items like their diastatic malt. I asked if they had any better options but they didn't. I'll report back if I find a more economic source.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • By oferl
      Hi :-) Bought 1.7Kg pork chunk, might be a bit of weird cutting, seems like a rack of pork chops caught between V shaped in bones.
      Would like to sous vide it whole without further cutting to single steaks and would be glad to get a direction for temp and time, from what i've seen 60-62C 
      area might be great to keep it juicy but i'm lost with the time, as it is a big chunk and not single steaks.. Thanks !   
    • By Rugby
      Hello fellow eGullet members. I stumbled across this forum while looking for ways to improve my food here.
      I've been a technical type all my life and started assembling my kitchen 7 years ago piece by piece after quitting living from hotels for the previous 12 years.  
      I currently enjoy smoked foods and tweaking local / regional recipes by applying technique instead of hard boiling or large batch frying.  So far it's allowed me to enjoy and reinforce my knowledge of ingredients.
      Thank you everyone contributing here and those folks who laid the frameworks for dispelling myths and providing understanding of ingredients and flavours.
      Best regards and bon-appetit,
      Warren
       
       
    • By ltjazz
      Hey all,
       
      I've made thicker and creamier sorbets with 25% to 35% sugar strained fruit purees and sugar, syrups, and other stabilizers that have worked well. However, because it's so much fruit and little to no water it can be an expensive project.
       
      I am trying to make "Water Ice" or "Italian Ice" in my home ice cream machine. Think of textures similar to Rita's Water Ice, Court Pastry Shop, or Miko's in Chicago. It eats much lighter than a sorbet but isn't really icy, but it's also not thick like sorbet. Ritas uses "flavoring" and sugar, while the other two use fruit juice. I'm thinking of thinning the strained fruit juice with water and adding a stabilizer, but I'm having trouble getting this in my home ice cream machine without it freezing solid like granita.
       
      Can anyone suggest a way to use real fruit juice, water, and a combination and concentration of stabilizers to get a looser, frozen fruit dessert that isn't icy?
    • By paulraphael
      Does anyone have reliable tricks for getting good flavor out of garlic in a sous-vide bag? I'm talking about using it just as an aromatic, while cooking proteins, or as part of a stock or vegetable puree.
       
      The one time I forgot the maxim to leave raw garlic out of the bag, I ended up with celeriac puree that tasted like a tire fire.
       
      I see some recommendations to just use less, but in my experience the problem wasn't just too much garlic flavor. It was acrid, inedible flavor. Using less works fine for me with other mirepoix veggies.
       
      I also see recipes for s.v. garlic confit (listed by both Anova and Nomiku) and for some reason people say these taste good. How can this be?
       
      There was a thread questioning the old saw about blanching garlic multiple times in milk, which didn't come to any hard conclusions.
       
      I'm wondering if a quick blanch in water before adding to the s.v. bag, to deactivate the enzymes, would do the trick. But I don't know the actual chemistry behind the garlic tire fire, so am not confident this would work.
       
      Some cooks advocate garlic powder; I'm hoping to not resort to that.
       
      Thoughts?
    • By May10April
      I know there was a thread on this a few years ago, however it seems these scales are no longer made or newer better models are available.
      As I've become more serious about my baking, I've decided to get a kitchen scale. I'm debating between the My Weigh KD-8000 http://www.amazon.com/My-Weigh-Digital-Weighing-Scale/dp/B001NE0FU2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1297958394&sr=8-1 or the EatSmart Precision Pro Digital Scale. http://www.amazon.com/EatSmart-Precision-Digital-Kitchen-Scale/dp/B001N0D7GA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1297958443&sr=1-1 Originally I wanted the Taylor Salter High Capacity Scale because it looked cool, but I've noticed it received many mixed reviews. http://www.amazon.com/Taylor-Salter-Aquatronics-Capacity-Kitchen/dp/B004BIOMGU/ref=sr_1_24?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1297958465&sr=1-24
      Here are my requirments:
      -Minimum capacity of 11 lbs
      -Minimum resolution of 1 g
      -Measure in Kg, lb, oz, g
      -Tare feature
      -Preferably have seamless buttons
      I want to get a nice scale. I don't want to get a scale with minimum features only to find in two years that I do enough baking/cooking that requires me to have something more sophisticated.
      Here are a few other questions:
      1. How important is it to have a scale measure fluid ounces?
      2. What about measuring lbs. oz (for example 6 lbs and 4.2 ounces)
      3. Is it important to have a scale measure in bakers %? I'd like to learn how to do these and have a cookbook that shows them next to the measurements. I'm not sure if this is something most people can figure out on their own or it would be handy to have them on a scale. The MW KD-8000 does this.
      The only problem with the MW-KD-8000 is it appears to be big and bulky and I don't have a lot of counter space so I'd probably keep it stored most of the time. The Eat Smart just seems to minimal. The Salter seems like an expensive scale for what it offers and somewhat of a risk.
      Thanks for any help in helping me choose the right scale. I do not know why this is becoming a chore to purchase! I just want to make sure I choose the right one right off the bat.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.