Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Recommended Posts

There are so many recipes for Picadillo, I was wondering who had a favorite combination.

For years, I made it combining two recipes from Elisabeth Lambert Ortiz, The Complete Book of Mexican Cooking, 'Picadillo' and 'Picadillo de la Costa'. Mine was called 'Picadillo de la Cabana' (We live in Cavan and that was the best I could do. Yes, I know, very silly.)

Yesterday's version was without fruit except for the raisins and apples.


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Picadillo is seriously one of my favorite Mexican/Latin dishes (see my response to your chile relleano post...). I've made a ton of different versions, and this is the one I've finally settled on as being most to my taste.

I got it an eon ago from the Food Network website. I just went to see if I could link it, and it doesn't appear to be up on their site any longer. I'm pretty sure it was by Aaron Sanchez. I also Googled that, and couldn't get a hit, so here it is, rewritten sufficiently I hope to get by any *issues*....

Picadillo Tacos

(6 servings)

2 Tblsp. vegetable oil

1 large onion, finely chopped

2 garlic cloves, minced

2 pounds ground pork

1/3C raisins

1/4C toasted slivered almonds

1&1/2C canned tomato sauce

1/2C sliced pimento-stuffed green olives

¾ tsp. ground cinnamon

½ tsp. ground cumin

¼ tsp. ground cloves

S&P to taste

3C shredded romaine or iceberg lettuce

1&1/2C coarsely grated radishes

Lime wedges

Cheddar cheese

12 taco shells

Heat oil in heavy pan over med/low heat. Add onion and garlic and cook until veg is soft, stirring often. Raise heat a bit, and add pork. Cook, breaking up lumps, until browned and cooked through. Drain extra fat, add raisins, nuts, sauce, olives and spices. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until thickened to your taste, about 10 or 15 minutes.

Put the picadillo in the warmed taco shells, and top with desired toppings. Squeeze lime over.

Cooked picadillo keeps in fridge for a day or two, reheat before making tacos. It also freezes really really well. I much prefer it in the hard, fried taco shells than in tortillas as soft tacos.

Enjoy !!


--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like a fine basic recipe except that I would probably mix the pork with beef. And use either fresh or canned tomatoes.

And I just made it using pulled pork and pulled beef chopped up after being frozen in great honking packages. (Pulled meat being good for all kinds of emergencies :wub: Our basic problem is that we eat 'dinner' at noon and that leaves all sorts of weekdays in chaos at the last minute with my having run out of time to get anything made. And so on. :wacko: )

The one thing I don't get is the hard taco thingy. Don't they just break while you are eating them and then the stuff falls all over the place???

Oh, I also add a dollop of cocoa usually. I have really no idea why. And I do love Picadillo de la Costa with all the fruit in it. DH likes it better without fruit, although I refuse to leave out the raisins.


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I often serve it as a dip at parties. Put in a crockpot or chafing dish to keep warm. Serve sturdy tortilla chips alongside.

Never fails to surprise me how many folks have never heard of it.

But it's always a huge hit.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

....The one thing I don't get is the hard taco thingy. Don't they just break while you are eating them and then the stuff falls all over the place???

....

You know, they don't really. If, and I guess this is the key, you get shells from a market with a high enough turnover that they're fresh and not on the road to cardboard. That could be an issue for you, I'm guessing. But if you try, make sure to heat them in a low oven (250-300°F) for about 5 minutes. Uncovered, just toss them on a baking sheet. That will liven them up. Then when you put your fillings in, the liquid sort of softens the corn, and they just get....crispy and chewy and *good*. It's the textural contrast thing. Put the "jucier" stuff on the bottom, and the drier stuff on top. The bottom may split a bit, but you can usually keep it mostly together by squeezing it with your fingers.

Like overstuffed sandwiches, though, the kiss of death is to put a filled hard taco down !

The oven-crisping should be done for tostada shells, also. You'd be amazed at what a difference it makes.

Don't get me wrong, I love soft tacos in certain applications (I'd *NEVER* make a fish taco with a hard shell), but sometimes I've just got to have that contrast between the succulent filling and the crunchy shell.


--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Traditionally, you don't see hard shells in Mexico. They have some tacos "dorados" where the taco and filling are fried until the taco is crisp but these "U" shaped things are from north of the border, I would bet. Not that they aren't good, but not very typical. I think a tostada would be more likely and now that I think of it, I'd enjoy one with some lettuce and a scoop of picadillo on top.


Visit beautiful Rancho Gordo!

Twitter @RanchoGordo

"How do you say 'Yum-o' in Swedish? Or is it Swiss? What do they speak in Switzerland?"- Rachel Ray

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Traditionally, you don't see hard shells in Mexico. They have some tacos "dorados" where the taco and filling are fried until the taco is crisp but these "U" shaped things are from north of the border, I would bet. Not that they aren't good, but not very typical. I think a tostada would be more likely and now that I think of it, I'd enjoy one with some lettuce and a scoop of picadillo on top.

Yes, you're absolutely right of course. I knew that the North American "hard shells" are an invention of the Southwest and border states (as is, btw, the fish taco, but that's another thread....). I was actually thinking about including it in my response to Darienne, but well, I hit "post" and the thought went "poof" (as many of my thoughts do) and it was lost. Thanks for helping out my old, feeble brain.

They're still tasty though, in their place !


--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I knew that the North American "hard shells" are an invention of the Southwest and border states (as is, btw, the fish taco, but that's another thread....).

Fish tacos, "an invention of the Southwest and border states"? Are you saying fisherfolk along the coasts of Mexico haven't been wrapping up their catch in tortillas? And then sprinkling on a little hot sauce? For hundreds of years? Probably even thousands? For as long as they've been making tortillas? And fishing?

In fact, not until some norteamericanos thought of it?

I'm sorry, but I simply can't imagine that. Am I missing something?

:blink:

_________________


Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't think you're missing something Jaymes, fish tacos are a producto de Mexico, not the American Southwest.

Ralph Rubio certainly popularized the fish taco and help mainstream it with his chain of Rubio's quick service restaurants, but he ddin't invent it. By his own admission, his fish tacos were originally based upon the fish tacos he enjoyed during Spring Break surfing trips to San Felipe, Baja California del Norte. Contrary to popular belief, the fish taco was not invented in San Diego, just the chain that made them popular. :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't think you're missing something Jaymes, fish tacos are a producto de Mexico, not the American Southwest.

Ralph Rubio certainly popularized the fish taco and help mainstream it with his chain of Rubio's quick service restaurants, but he ddin't invent it. By his own admission, his fish tacos were originally based upon the fish tacos he enjoyed during Spring Break surfing trips to San Felipe, Baja California del Norte. Contrary to popular belief, the fish taco was not invented in San Diego, just the chain that made them popular. :laugh:

Whew. Gave me quite a start!


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I knew that the North American "hard shells" are an invention of the Southwest and border states (as is, btw, the fish taco, but that's another thread....).

Fish tacos, "an invention of the Southwest and border states"? Are you saying fisherfolk along the coasts of Mexico haven't been wrapping up their catch in tortillas? And then sprinkling on a little hot sauce? For hundreds of years? Probably even thousands? For as long as they've been making tortillas? And fishing?

In fact, not until some norteamericanos thought of it?

I'm sorry, but I simply can't imagine that. Am I missing something?

:blink:

_________________

No, you're not. Fish tacos are from Baja, California, which is Mexico.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the more entertaining delights of life is to watch the face of a Veracruzano, especially one from around Alvarado, as it is explained to them that people on the west coast batter and fry the fish for the fish tacos. They think that strictly comida de Gringolandia invading Mexico.

Never a dull, boring, or less than tasty moment!

Regards,

Theabroma


Sharon Peters aka "theabroma"

The lunatics have overtaken the asylum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My mom's picadillo (which I used to describe to friends as "Cuban Sloppy Joe") was always ground beef, diced onions, diced red and/or green bell pepper, minced garlic, slivered pimento stuffed olives, capers, golden raisins, tomato sauce, lots of cumin and oregano and just a little cinnamon all simmered with several bay leaves. I liked a little shot of hot sauce on mine at the end, but mom didn't like spicy food so it couldn't go in the pot. Good stuff. I haven't made it in a while so perhaps I needed this thread to bump it up in my brain. Maybe I'll make some this weekend...


Edited by KatieLoeb (log)

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to an unsupported statement in Wikipedia (!), nixtamalization equipment found in Guatemala has been dated to 1,200 – 1,500 BCE (3,200 – 3,500 years ago). I would love to learn more about this history, preferably from someone with better resources than Wikipedia.

On topic: We have been very happy with the recipe for picadillo Oaxaqueno from Rick Bayless’ Authentic Mexican. For a closely related recipe, click and scroll down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone else have any favorite picadillo recipes? Originally I had no idea of how many varieties there are. :hmmm:

I think I'll try the Bayless Empanadas recipe posted by C. Sapidus, but with the picadillo which I have already made. I'll try the Bayless picadillo recipe next time with the pork only.


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I normally follow Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's recipe, mostly because it's the only one I have (in hard copy, anyway) and his recipes are reliable. He may not offer the best picadillo/bolognese/steak and kidney pie/etc but he'll always point you in the right direction.

I followed his recipe tonight, bar one or two points I picked up elsewhere. I started by frying 500 grams of pork mince (if I was making a larger quantity I'd have done equal parts pork and beef). I put it aside once it was browned up nicely and fried some diced onion and garlic with a star anise pod (see also: Heston Blumenthal). Once the onion was softened and browned I added 800 grams canned (diced) tomatoes, the spices (cloves, cumin, cinnamon, a little bit of chilli powder, black pepper), sultanas (I know all the recipes say to use raisins--but I can buy bundles of single serve packs of sultanas designed for school lunches, which give me the perfect quantity for dishes like this and don't require me to waste any or find some excuse to use them up), a good handful of slivered almonds and a generous splash of white wine vinegar (all out of apple cider vinegar). Added, too, some sliced jalapenos from a jar--I can't easily get chipotles here (the only chipotle product I recall seeing is the Tabasco chiptole sauce, which you can only buy at specialist retailer 'USA Foods'--supermarkets just carry the red one)--purely because I like them more than the fresh options readily avaliable to me. I simmered it for maybe a hour. I've found that things like this are always, always, always better when cooked for a long time (i.e. a hour as opposed to ten minutes). Didn't include olives as one of the recipes above--the Rick Whoever one--didn't include them and, too, I've found olives, unless of good quality (which I can't afford at the moment) or added at the last minute, aren't so nice in dishes like this.

I moved away from Mexico altogether when serving it--didn't feel like making tortillas and didn't want to pay for them (about $5 for half a dozen low quality tortillas) so I used little pita breads. Hey, it works ...

I'm very happy with the picadillo. In fact, I'd rate this version, with the preserved jalapenos, above the versions I've made with fresh chillies--the preserved chillies just add something I really like. Can't quite identify it. If anything, I'd say this needs sour cream, which I'd happily drive off and get if I hadn't consumed so much gin.


Edited by ChrisTaylor (log)

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Henga
      Hi there! I am looking for a good Mexican cookbook. Any recommendations? Thanks in advance.
    • By newchef
      I'm trying to make a Roasted Poblano and Black Bean Enchilada recipe and I don't know if the tomatillo cream sauce will be freezer-friendly.     Basically I process the following ingredients in a food processor to make the cream sauce.  I plan on freezing the sauce in ice-cube trays for individual servings.  The sauce will then be thawed and spread on a baking dish and also used to top the enchiladas and cook in a 400 degree oven.   Thanks!   INGREDIENTS:   -26 ounces canned tomatillos, drained -1 onion -1/2 cup cilantro leaves -1/3 cup vegetable broth -1/4 cup heavy cream -1 tbsp vegetable oil -3 garlic cloves -1 tbsp lime juice -1 tsp sugar -1 tsp salt
    • By David Ross
      Ah, the avocado! For many of us, this humble little fruit inspires only one dish. Yet the avocado has a culinary history that is deeper than we may understand.
       
      The avocado (Persea Americana) is a tree thought to have originated in South Central Mexico.  It’s a member of the flowering plant family Lauraceae.  The fruit of the plant - yes, it's a fruit and not a vegetable - is also called avocado.
       
      Avocados grow in tropical and warm climates throughout the world.  The season in California typically runs from February through September, but avocados from Mexico are now available year-round.
       
      The avocado has a higher fat content than other fruits, and as such serves as an important staple in the diet of consumers who are seeking other sources of protein than meats and fatty foods.  Avocado oil has found a new customer base due to its flavor in dressings and sauces and the high smoke point is favorable when sautéing meat and seafood. 
       
      In recent years, due in part to catchy television commercials and the influence of Pinterest, the avocado has seen a resurgence in popularity with home cooks and professionals.  Walk into your local casual spot and the menu will undoubtedly have some derivation of avocado toast, typically topped with bacon.  Avocados have found a rightful place back on fine dining menus, but unfortunately all too often over-worked dishes with too many ingredients and garnishes erase the pure taste and silky texture of an avocado. 
       
      When I think of an avocado it’s the Hass variety.  However, a friend who lives in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, can buy Choquette, Hall and Lulu avocados in the local markets.  This link provides good information about the different varieties of avocados, when they’re in season and the differences in taste and texture. https://www.foodrepublic.com/2012/10/18/know-your-avocado-varieties-and-when-theyre-in-season/
       
      I for one must challenge myself to start eating and cooking more avocados.  I think my recipe for guacamole served with chicharrones is superb, and the cobb salad with large chunks of ripe avocado is delicious, but as a close friend recently said, “one person’s ‘not especially new’ is another’s “eureka moment.” Well said and as history tells us, we’ll find plenty of eureka moments as we discuss and share our tales and dishes of avocado during eG Cook-Off #81: The Avocado.
       
      Fun fact: The name avocado derives from the Nahuatl word “ahuacatl,” which was also slang for “testicle.”
      See the complete eG Cook-Off Index here https://forums.egullet.org/topic/143994-egullet-recipe-cook-off-index/
    • By Darienne
      Chile Rellenos.  Every Mexican or Mexican type restaurant we've ever been in almost, I've chosen Chile Rellenos.   I keep thinking I'll pick something different...and then I don't.  I've made them.  Once.  So much trouble.  And deep fat frying.  And of course in the Far Frozen North where we live, we've been able to get Poblanos (that's it) for only about five years now.  
       
      Imagine my delight, the appeal to my very lazy side, to discover the following recipe just a few days ago: https://www.homesicktexan.com/2018/09/chile-relleno-casserole-el-paso-style.html  .  And yesterday I made them and served them to guests with Mexican rice and black beans.  Died and gone to heaven.
       
      OK.  Truth time.  I used Poblanos and  I did not roast them to remove the skins.  In an electric oven, it's not a nice job.  And besides the skins have never bothered me or Ed at all.  But I did roast the Poblanos in the oven.  And then I used commercial salsa because we had one we liked.  (Did I say that I can be lazy sometimes?)  And I used Pepper Jack cheese.  Jack cheese is not always available in the small Ontario city we live outside of and pepper jack is even less common.  Buy it when you see it.  I defrosted some frozen guacamole I had in the freezer.  But by heavens the casserole was delicious and now it's on our menu permanently.
       
      So shoot me.  But I thought I'd share my joy anyway. 
    • By jackie40503
      I lived in Phoenix AZ a total of 24 years and during that time I found what the local restaurants call a Green Chili Burro. I have also lived and worked in 48 states and the only ones who have them is either in Arizona, Western New Mexico or Southern California. I am now retired in Northwest Washington State. I have searched the internet for recipes and have found that none of them taste the same. I have also written to many Mexican restaurants and either did not receive a reply or was told that they could not give out the recipe. I am now going around to blogs/forums dealing with Mexican foods hoping that someone would have the actual recipe from one of the restaurants. Its not like I am going trying to compete with them since I live along way from those areas and only wish to serve it in my own household.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...