Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Tostadas


Darienne
 Share

Recommended Posts

OK. Sorry it took awhile to get back.

Add 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano to the tomato sauce mixture when you are simmering the pork.

You can use this to stuff soft or hard taco shells. I don't see why you can't use it for nachos or enchiladas also.

I haven't done it yet but you could substitute chicken for the pork and it would be just as good. Sub ancho or cayenne for chipotle, italian oregano for mexican, chicken broth for the pork broth, etc. Slice a few fresh peppers and saute them with the pork then simmer with the tomato broth for a fresher pepper flavor. Try it with beef, too.

In fact, we are having tinga again for dinner tonight.

The brand of tostada shell I use is Guerrero. It has less sodium than the other brands I saw.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 9 years later...
1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

For the fist time I made tostadas.

 

Tostadas09242019.png

 

 

They puffed up remarkably in the hot oil.

 

 

 

Hi Jo,

 

Those look  a lot like puffy tortillas, which are most excellent as well.

 

The pretty big Latino community around here brings tostadas into our grocery stores and their bodegas. My understanding, and apparently their understanding too, is mostly of commercially-packed thin and very crispy yellow corn tortillas that are mostly bought in big stacks in plastic sleeves. They are as crispy and dry as tortilla chips and I sometimes substitute them for that after breaking them up.

 

A puffy tortilla, like you show is a superior homemade product, but can certainly be substituted for the inferior commercial tostada to great effect. You can also fold your fluffy tortillas to make wonderful tacos, and that can't happen with tostadas from the store.

 

I want to say that puffy tortillas (homemade) are native to Arizona and New Mexico. I think there are restaurants famous for them there. That is where I know them from, but they may be doing them in Mexico as well. Anyone who has good information, please correct me/educate us all.

 

I made Vivian Howard's "Grandma Hill's Hoecakes" the other day and still have 3 in the freezer. They are quite tasty and much like tortillas. The recipe is from her book, "Deep Run Roots". The recipe doesn't contain eggs and I had buttermilk frozen, so Bob's your uncle. 🙂

 

  • Like 2

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

54 minutes ago, IowaDee said:

Puffy or not, all I know is that it is watching me!  Can you see the face?

Perhaps you need another cup of coffee?😂

  • Haha 3

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 

Hi Jo,

 

Those look  a lot like puffy tortillas, which are most excellent as well.

 

The pretty big Latino community around here brings tostadas into our grocery stores and their bodegas. My understanding, and apparently their understanding too, is mostly of commercially-packed thin and very crispy yellow corn tortillas that are mostly bought in big stacks in plastic sleeves. They are as crispy and dry as tortilla chips and I sometimes substitute them for that after breaking them up.

 

A puffy tortilla, like you show is a superior homemade product, but can certainly be substituted for the inferior commercial tostada to great effect. You can also fold your fluffy tortillas to make wonderful tacos, and that can't happen with tostadas from the store.

 

I want to say that puffy tortillas (homemade) are native to Arizona and New Mexico. I think there are restaurants famous for them there. That is where I know them from, but they may be doing them in Mexico as well. Anyone who has good information, please correct me/educate us all.

 

I made Vivian Howard's "Grandma Hill's Hoecakes" the other day and still have 3 in the freezer. They are quite tasty and much like tortillas. The recipe is from her book, "Deep Run Roots". The recipe doesn't contain eggs and I had buttermilk frozen, so Bob's your uncle. 🙂

 

 

These were the leftover corn tortillas I'd made two nights before.  I was going to deep fry them for tacos but by frying them flat as tostadas I was able to use the same pan for three different dishes without washing.  I am lazy.

 

 

  • Like 2

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Here's a good topping for tostadas, courtesy of Diana Kennedy: Equal amounts of good quality chorizo and white cabbage (doesn't need to be exact, but try to not skimp on the chorizo), a chopped white onion, a little garlic if you want, and some commercial salsa if things look a little dry. Cook them together for a while until the cabbage and chorizo are fully cooked. No need to add oil because the chorizo generally releases enough fat to keep things from sticking. Pile onto tostadas and top with crumbled queso fresco or crema (we prefer the cheese). Leftover chorizo mixture is good in tacos or stuffed into zucchini or chayote and baked.

 

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Formerly "Nancy in CO"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...