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Broccoli stems


JAZ
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I have to admit that I usually buy broccoli crowns -- they're more expensive, but easier to deal with if what you want is florets. But today at the store, all that was available was broccoli with long stems. Very long stems.

My first course of action would have been to save them for broccoli soup, but then I started thinking about other ways to use them. I ended up trimming and peeling them, then cutting each stem in two, yielding pieces about two inches long and just over 1 inch in diameter. I steamed them for 7 minutes, just enough to soften them but not enough that they lost all crunch.

After chilling them, I sliced them on my ceramic slicer along with some shallots and tossed in a dressing of olive oil and lemon, with some garlic and parsley. It made a great salad, and I felt virtuous for a) not wasting the stems and b) eating more broccoli.

This, of course, has me wondering what else I can do with broccoli stems. Does anyone else use them? What more can I do with them?

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In our restaurant, we always used them in stir-fries along with the florets, and I still do at home. The easiest way to peel the stem is with a potato peeler. This takes off just the tough outer layer.

I've used the stems for slaw, along with red cabbage, julienne carrots, dried cranberry, and roasted pumpkin seeds.

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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The "good part" is the part I often find myself having to find a use for. The peeled stalks are milder in flavor and aroma so I actually prefer them as an ingredient. I like to eat broccoli on it's own both cooked and raw but I'm generally not a big fan of it as an ingredient unless it's something where broccoli is supposed to be the flavor focus. It just seems to take over most dishes and push everything else into the background. The stalks aren't as pushy as the flower heads. I don't usually put broccoli in my stir fries but, on the rare occasion when I do, I only use the peeled, sliced stalks. They're also good peeled and oven roasted whole. Slices in some soups are nice too.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I'm not a fan of raw broccoli, which is why I've never considered buying the broccoli slaw mix. But I can see blanching julienned broccoli stems and dressing them the way I do celery root remoulade, with a creamy mustard and dill vinaigrette.

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There is a recipe on new york times website for pickled broccoli stems that I like a lot. I also usually but the florets but when I get broccoli and generally use to make broccoli cheddar soup, puree, or the NYT recipe.

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  • 2 months later...

I had some stems left over from a broccoli floret dish, and used them in a gratin. After trimming and slicing, I simmering them in cream infused with garlic and thyme until they were softened but not mushy. Then I spooned them out into a small gratin dish and reduced the cream, poured it over and topped the whole thing with buttered panko and parm. The dish went into a 375 oven until it was bubbling and the topping had browned. I'll definitely make this again.

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We chop them and toss them into our green salads all the time. And put them into stirfrys, as others have said. They're especially good julienned on a crudites tray.

They're very versatile and really nothing to throw away.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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There is a recipe on new york times website for pickled broccoli stems that I like a lot. I also usually but the florets but when I get broccoli and generally use to make broccoli cheddar soup, puree, or the NYT recipe.

Interesting. Here's that link: salt 'em, brine 'em (sherry vinegar the only real tweak), eat 'em. Sounds good to me.

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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  • 1 year later...

I'm not a fan of raw broccoli, which is why I've never considered buying the broccoli slaw mix. But I can see blanching julienned broccoli stems and dressing them the way I do celery root remoulade, with a creamy mustard and dill vinaigrette.

I really like this celery root salad, but I can rarely find decent celery root around here, so tonight I tried it with julienned broccoli stems. Definitely a keeper.

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Steam or microwave 'em and put some Modernist Cuisine cheese (from the mac & cheese recipe) on top while still warm - mix when it's melted.

Did that last night with some broccoli that was a tad past its best-by date. Yum.

Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory

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I have a nifty little tool that I usually use for beets and carrots, which produces very long shoestrings. I love broccoli stems done this way, quick-cured in lime juice with a hint of aji pepper, and added as a garnish to salads and cold starches.

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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I have a nifty little tool that I usually use for beets and carrots, which produces very long shoestrings. I love broccoli stems done this way, quick-cured in lime juice with a hint of aji pepper, and added as a garnish to salads and cold starches.

Well this sounds fabulous and I will definitely be trying! I'm also imagining these thin shreds in an East-Asian style salad...

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A Chinese cafe I go to serves a salad with broccoli stems that's pretty good. I think it's got vinegar, salt, chili or chili paste, probably sesame oil, and cilantro. Not sure what else. I think they're raw, not sure if they peel them first, then they're sliced thin the long way.

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I have a nifty little tool that I usually use for beets and carrots, which produces very long shoestrings. I love broccoli stems done this way, quick-cured in lime juice with a hint of aji pepper, and added as a garnish to salads and cold starches.

Well this sounds fabulous and I will definitely be trying! I'm also imagining these thin shreds in an East-Asian style salad...

It's very good when mixed with shredded green mango and papaya, with a dressing of fresh-squozen lemongrass and crushed peanuts and more lime.... (you can never go wrong in a salad with lime!)

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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My father uses the stems in much the same manner he uses water chestnuts - adds them whenever he wants a little extra crunch.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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We peel em and cook em w the rest of the broccoli.

Panaderia Canadiense - I'm having a heck of a lot of fun visualizing squeezing the juice out of lemongrass. I think I better start watering mine more!

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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I have a couple in the fridge right now, they'll go into my new Vitamix blender tonight, together with leftover fire roasted potatoes and some other stuff I have floating around in the fridge, soup time!

If I make stir fry I always use them in there as well, peel and cut small, I love their taste. You can also fry them in butter until nicely golden, some s&p, maybe some lemon juice....

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

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Escabeche and fuggetaboutit... as you might know in Mexico.. the Escabeche is one of the more prominent ways to eat vegetables particularly Carrots, Cauliflower, Green Beans, Zucchini, Cabbage & Brocoli... lightly blanched vegetables pickled with a gentle vinaigrette that has chiles, garlic, black pepper, oregano, thyme & other spice / herbs to taste... pickled anywhere from a few hours to a few days.

Brocoli stems are even better for this application than the florets. The pickled vegetables are typically served as appetizer with some tostadas... or sliced up bite size tossed with salad greens for a delicous, light salad.

http://mexican-recipes.bavariasoft.com/recipes/bverduras.php

Edited by EatNopales (log)
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My neighbors brought over some broccoli and shrimp Sunday night. We cut the broccoli into chunks, peeled the stems, marinated it in soy, balsamic, olive oil, and garlic. We put the broccoli and shrimp(separately marinated in olive oil, lemon juice, hot pepper & tomato) on skewers, and smoked them over applewood in my Walmart charcoal grill.

No leftovers. :sad:

Edited by technophile50 (log)
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