Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
Richard Kilgore

Korean Tea recommendations?

Recommended Posts

A friend may be going to Korea early this year and has offered to bring back some Korean tea and tea-things for me. Anyone know anything about Korean teas and have suggestions?

Koreans drink a lot of barley tea (bori-cha) and corn tea (sorry, don't know the romanji for that one) as well as green tea mixed with brown rice. I personally prefer Korean green tea. I'll have my +1 add some notes for you, she's from Seoul.

The +1 comments follow:

I would recommend Jak-Sul Cha which means sparrow tongue tea. The dried tea leaves look like sparrow's tongue. It is very unique Korean tea. Most tea grown in Korea is similar to Chinese or Japanese teas. A lot depends on where your friend is going. If he's going to be in the city, that's one thing, if he's traveling, he can go to the tea growing areas in the southwest and that's a whole entire new adventure.


Edited by tsure (log)

Red meat is not bad for you. Now blue-green meat, that’s bad for you!

Tommy Smothers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Koreans drink a lot of barley tea (bori-cha) and corn tea (sorry, don't know the romanji for that one) as well as green tea mixed with brown rice.

The roasted corn tea is called ok-susu cha. Ginseng tea is quite popular in Korea also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, tsure and Beto.

I found some interesting info in Wikepedia, here.

Korean tea refers to various types of tisane that can be served hot or cold. Not necessarily related to "common" tea, they are made from diverse substances including fruits, leaves, roots, and grains used in traditional Korean medicine.

The writer dates "the first historical record documenting the offering of tea to an ancestral god" to a rite in the year 661. Toward the end of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), common people joined the practice of royalty and "used tea for ancestral rites, following the Chinese example based on Zhu Xi's text Formalities of Family".

No mention of green teas similar to those of Japan and China, but it is not clear whether the tea ceremonies historically used green teas or some of the tisanes. At any rate the entry focuses on tisanes. And the list of the various tisanes is extensive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I received a couple of Korean green teas in a tea trade with Wholemeal Crank. Korean teas are much, much harder to find in the West, compared to Chinese and Japanese teas. Does anyone have web sources for Korean tea? I am primarily interested in the green teas, but am open to whatever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

www.shanshuiteas.com has a good selection of korean teas


Edited by jpr54_ (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In NY/NJ area there is Korean market HanAhReum which has many different teas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are we talking tea tea, or any of the other hot drinks generally referred to as "cha"" in Korean?

I love yujacha, a hot drink made from a yuzu-like marmalade. We always have a bottle in the fridge for when we have sore throats. My husband is a big fan of yulmucha, a kind of hot cereal beverage made with Job's Tears. And when I see it, I also like to get a cup of dae-cha - jujube tea. It's not summer without a jug of bori-cha (barley tea) in the fridge, either.

For "tea" tea, I like nokcha, with brown rice, especially in the morning. I usually had the bags from the supermarket - I've never tried any from a specialty purveyor. In Korea, O'Sulloc was a popular green tea, although I caqn't recall having tried any. I'm going on a short trip to Busan in June, and I'm looking forward to picking some up and comparing it to my local product.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have tried many of the green Korean teas including

saejak goryeo 2009

Joongjak Goryeo 2009

I prefer the greens rather than the barley teas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Put together a review of the Hankook Oolong tea today.

This is fairly pricey like most Korean teas, apparently due to rarity with most being consumed inside Korea.

The leaves are dark, small, twisted, with toasty and fruity odors. When added to the prewarmed gaiwan, the odor is stronger, mostly fruity and tart.

4552449410_f7922cc417.jpg

The first 30 second infusion with water several minutes off the boil (probably about 180 degrees) yields an amber infusion, tasted like dilute black tea--touch of fruit, bit of toasty, but very little of the floral and earthy notes I expect from my chinese oolongs.

2nd infusion at 170 degrees (thought it was a bit warmer, surprised when it was so cool in the cup), also about 30 seconds, again tastes strongly of....well...black tea. A little fruity, very tea-like, a little hint of caramel.

4551811975_da0b9fa239.jpg

For the 4th infusion, I put water just off the boil for 20 seconds, and a little more sweetness comes out. It reminds me a bit of the Yunnan Oriental Beauty I got from Yunnan Sourcing: tastes strongly oxidized, like a black tea, but without any of the bitterness that makes most of them intolerable to me.

The leaves are broken, curled, dark after infusion, and again, has a strong tea scent. ('Tea scent' here is code for smells like lipton, but that seems like a bad word to use describing a pleasant mild tea.)

4551812981_9c1b3241cb.jpg

It is easy and pleasant, but not that special for the price.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      Even though I would like to change the situation, the winter is coming. Sooner or later there will be sharp winds, frost and unpleasant moisture. I don't know how you like to warm up at home, but on the first cold day I dust off my home recipe for hot and yummy winter teas.

      You can use my recipe or come up with your own proposals for fiery mixtures. Only one thing should be the same: your favourite tea must be strong and hot.

      Ingredients (for 2 teas)
      Raspberry-orange
      8 cloves
      a piece of cinnamon
      2 grains of cardamom
      4 slices of orange
      2 teaspoons of honey
      your favourite tea
      50ml of raspberry juice or 30ml of raspberry juice and 30ml of raspberry liqueur
      Add 4 of the cloves, cinnamon and cardamom to some water and boil for a while to release their flavour and aroma. Remove the seasoning and brew the tea with this water. Crush two slices of orange with honey. Add the raspberry juice or a mixture of juice and liqueur to the tea. Next add the honey with orange. Mix it in. Decorate the tea with the rest of the cloves and orange.

      Lemon-ginger
      8 cloves
      3 slices of fresh ginger
      2 grains of cardamom
      50ml of ginger syrup or 30ml of ginger syrup and 30ml of ginger-lemon liqueur
      4 slices of lemon
      2 teaspoons of honey
      Add 4 of the cloves, ginger and cardamom to some water and boil for a while to release their flavour and aroma. Remove the seasoning and brew the tea with this water. Crush two slices of lemon with honey. Add the ginger syrup or mixture of syrup and liqueur to the tea. Next add honey with lemon. Mix it in. Decorate the tea with the rest of the cloves and lemon.

      Enjoy your drink!

    • By Hezo541
      My friend sent me some Chinese tea called Songxiang tea. 
      Has anybody drunk this kind of tea? It's the first time I've heard of this tea.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...