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ngatti

Int'l Hotel Motel Restaurant Show

77 posts in this topic

Cab--I'm participating in all the demos. I organized them and host them.

Click on the link above. Suvir and Meredith Kurtzman are demoing at 3:30--and both are deep frying! (I love deep fried things.) The gang of four--Michael, Patrice, Paul and Colleen--demo on Monday.


Steve Klc

Pastry chef-Restaurant Consultant

Oyamel : Zaytinya : Cafe Atlantico : Jaleo

chef@pastryarts.com

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Steve Klc -- Thanks for the clarification. In prior years, what have been the better exhibitors? Apart from the demonstrations, are there food and wine samplings?

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There are samplings, but they tend to be of the commercial egg roll or quick parboiled paella variety. There are always some gems, but the show really is an industry thing--geared to the nuts and bolts of making hotels and restaurants work--lots of frozen foods, stuff that can be outsourced, very good breads I must say, wholesale suppliers, mucho espresso and coffee, tons of hardware and equipment and plates and dishwashers and linens and computers and vacuums...well, you get the point. "Normal" foodies would not be interested in much of this stuff out on the show floor. Curious people, perverse people, like me though, might find some enjoyment in wandering the aisles--be forewarned, though, there is alot more low end than high end stuff. You will discover why all Chinese takeout restaurants seem to have the same 4 sauces--they buy them from the same supplier. Some of the stuff is absolute dreck and then some things are surprisingly, compellingly appealing.

This show is not a celebration of small artisinal products--or small scale--which is but one reason why I invited a few chefs sensitive to the changing seasons and farmer's markets and special ingredients or techniques outside of the mainstream. In past years there have been some serious networking events concurrent with the show--some of the "Restaurant Futurists Conference" topics have been cool, some of the seminars and special events have appeal--but it is hard to appeal to all people all of the time. The educational sessions usually tend to be free and those with special tastings tend to have a fee. I'm not up on what is happening this year outside of my own small area of responsibility--but usually the seminars Michael Batterberry has been involved in or organized have been the most interesting, subjectively, to me, along with the stuff on design. I'm a sucker for talks on restaurant design, especially if Warren Ashworth or Larry Bogdanow are on the panel discussions, as they frequently are.

There is also a wonderful Salon--a free culinary competition--which runs during the demonstrations. Lots of thankless work, lost arts like tallow carving, garde manger work and pastillage, wedding cakes and pastry showpieces and displays of chocolate and sugar--it can be browsed easily--and Chefette (Colleen) happens to be one of 6 judges of that competition now, having won the top medal herself a few years ago. (Only the second female chef in over 130 years to win the Grand Prize, something she shares with male chefs like Albert Kumin and Andre Soltner.)

If any eGulleteer wants to walk through the Salon and ask questions about any of the work, I'd be glad to answer them.


Steve Klc

Pastry chef-Restaurant Consultant

Oyamel : Zaytinya : Cafe Atlantico : Jaleo

chef@pastryarts.com

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Michael is brilliant..... and Larry Bogdanow is great with design... I will have to find out if he is part of the show..... I love his work...

And thanks to Steve Klc, there are some exciting things happening for people into desserts.. :smile:

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Since we are tearing down to the ground and rebuilding from scratch (with Three Kitchens!), I'll have much to look at (everything). I've planted the Bonnet seed and am carefully watering it. We'll see if it grows

Several friends and aquaintances will be competing at the salon (not pastry). I no longer compete. I've taken Blue Ribbons in two categories and it took me a few years to get there. No mas all nighters the night before the Salon (and after service too!). Although I no longer compete, I love the enthusiam of the younger chef/cooks and students who do. Great sacrifice is made by those who participate. I feel I pay respect by walking through the Salon and looking at their work.

Nick

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I was supposed to be in Utah for a conference but it was postponed until January.

So i'm planning on attending Monday.

Nick and Suvir I would love to somehow hook up with you guys.

I look forward to the culinary competition, it's always a lot of fun.

Although I haven't met anyone competing from egullet, I wish you all luck and succees.


Turnip Greens are Better than Nothing. Ask the people who have tried both.

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I'll be at the Heinekin Booth at about 11:00. Blue Blazer, Regimental Striped tie (Hey, I work at a private club). We can go bother Klc.

Nick :biggrin:

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Not sure yet what i'll be wearing, but would love to throw back a cold one with you and others


Turnip Greens are Better than Nothing. Ask the people who have tried both.

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At least I know what you look like, CC. We'll embarrass ourselves together, going up to people and saying, Excuse me, are you from egullet? :biggrin:

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At least I know what you look like, CC.  We'll embarrass ourselves together, going up to people and saying, Excuse me, are you from egullet?  :biggrin:

Maybe you could lead CC to me Suzanne. Would love to see you both.

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Some of the dishes I've heard about for Monday's demo are pretty interesting--I'll let the pastry chefs involved reveal the final versions ahead of time if they so choose.  You know how chefs are--things can change right up until the last moment.  

Uh oh. Somehow Steve has read my mind. I think I'm going with my plan B...

Was initially going to play with spaghetti squash, but the response to my recent sweet potato sorbet has been favorable. Will pair it with a warm, spiced chocolate "emulsion", milk jam, maple, hazelnut biscuit, and a touch of Maldon sea salt. Maybe.

At least I know where I'll be eating every night next week!


Michael Laiskonis

Pastry Chef

New York

www.michael-laiskonis.com

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As of now I expect to be there on Monday. I will be wearing clothes and my badge says Food Bytes. :smile:


Rosalie Saferstein, aka "Rosie"

TABLE HOPPING WITH ROSIE

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As of now I expect to be there on Monday. I will be wearing clothes and  my badge says Food Bytes.  :smile:

Is it clothing optional? :wink:

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Mrs B. and I expect to attend as many of the demos as we can. I haven't had time to check the schedules. I believe they are on Saturday and Monday. I look a lot like my avatar. You know, kinda square, but with a beard. I haven't selected my clothing yet, but maybe corduroy slacks. I've been wearing them more often since that cabbie in Paris said he thought I must be professor or artist because of my "velour" pants. If there's one thing the French know, it's surface. :biggrin:


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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If there's one thing the French know, it's surface.  :biggrin:

And pain au chocolat. :smile:

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MEETING PLACE WARNING

There is NO Heineken booth at this show. The only large brewery booth is Anheuser-Busch, #1511 on the upper level -- right by one of the entrances. Just thought people should know, so no one wastes too much time looking.

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Thanks Suzanne, Nice Catch. Wha happened? There's *always* a Heinekin booth. :wink:

Well, I'll be hangin' about the demonstration kitchen. I assume that will still be in the rear.

Nick

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A few of us managed to meet without the aid of a Heineken booth. Most of the people I met gathered after the first demo of the day and Suzanne was among the group. Don't worry about her spending all her time looking for the Heineken booth. I missed Nick and I assume the Caped Chef, but since I didn't know what he was wearing, I can't be sure he just wasn't avoiding me.

I really enjoyed the demos for the tastings as well as for the tips, personalities and entertainment. I probably won't make it back tomorrow, but expect to be there on Monday when Michael (mlpc), Colleen (chefette) and Patrice (Patrice) will be feeding, instructing and entertaining those who get seats at the demo.


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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I almost forgot about the Blue Hill exception to my self-imposed non-posting. The BH dish demonstrated by both Dan and Mike was a pain perdu dessert.

The brioche bread from Tom Cat Bakery was cut, using molds, into circular pieces that had a hole further cut in the middle (like a donut, but without "puff" effect). After dipping of the pain perdu into a mixture consisting of milk, vanilla beans, cinnamon, all spice (referring to a spice mixture utilized by BH that includes cardamom), sugar and egg, the pieces of pain perdu were set forth on a baking tray. An apple compote (currently consisting of four different apple varieties purchased from the Union Square Greenmarket) had separately been made, with seasoning based on vanilla beans, orange and lemon zest, raisins and butter. The apples were diced, and marinated in this mixture. Dan noted that the marked sweetness of apple pie was not the target; a measure of acidity added flavor complexity to the apples. Having several different types of apples also allows sweetness to be adjusted. Dan then observed that BH considers two factors significant in developing desserts: (1) seasonality of produce, and (2) ease of assembly when the space in the BH kitchen for dessert is very limited. The pain perdu dessert is easy to assemble because the apple compote and the below-described almond creme can be made a week in advance.

On top of the pain perdu, there was spread almond creme before baking. The almond creme was composed of sugar, butter, almond flour, eggs, flour and rum. When the baking is completed, the final touch is to add pain perdu ice cream (which Dan noted was intended to have a gingerbread connotation).

The pain perdu itself, leaving aside the ice cream, was good-minus (this is not a negative comment, given the non-ordinary-kitchen conditions under which the chefs were operating). There was a bit too much spicing for my subjective tastes, but I have never sampled a pain perdu that I have considered beyond good. The almond creme was not separately discernible, but aided the formation of a crustiness on top of the pain perdu. I considered the ice cream a bit too soft when served, even though the Pacojet had been utilized at the demonstration facility after having been transported there by BH. Also, for me, the pairing of a pain perdu ice cream with a pain perdu dessert was unnecessary -- perhaps a malt ice cream might have subjectively suited me better. An interesting discussion between Steve Klc and the BH chefs on their respective methods for utilizing Pacojet, including the need to adapt "ordinary" dessert recipes for the Pacojet. At BH, there are different Pacojet containerse of frozen ice cream, which get individually whipped up when dessert orders are fulfilled. Dan keeps the Pacojet close to the area where plating occurs at BH. He uses the Pacojet to make soup from the sweetest peas, and also to make certain spinash purees.

The other party demonstrating during the morning session was Tribeca Grill's pastry chef. Malawry and edemuth assisted with prep work and the handing out of samples to audience members. At one point, Mike was kind enough to assist as well. It was nice meeting Steve Klc, chefette, edemuth and Suzanne F for the first time. :laugh: I enjoyed spending much of the day with Bux and his wife. :laugh: :laugh:

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A few of us managed to meet without the aid of a Heineken booth. Most of the people I met gathered after the first demo of the day and Suzanne was among the group. Don't worry about her spending all her time looking for the Heineken booth. I missed Nick and I assume the Caped Chef, but since I didn't know what he was wearing, I can't be sure he just wasn't avoiding me.

I really enjoyed the demos for the tastings as well as for the tips, personalities and entertainment. I probably won't make it back tomorrow, but expect to be there on Monday when Michael (mlpc), Colleen (chefette) and Patrice (Patrice) will be feeding, instructing and entertaining those who get seats at the demo.

Monday for me also Bux. I'll try to get to the demonstration kitchen. Hope to see you all there. :smile:

Nick

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We weren't very good about making orderly rounds of the exhibits but there was some good bacon (is there bad bacon?) and pretty good commerical French charcuterie to sample. Also of note to me, as I've been using Danesi Gold espresso beans for some time, a new offering from Danesi that is also an all Arabica espresso roast. This one is has 'doppio' in the name and comes in a black package. I have to try and talk DiPalo's into carrying it. I thought it was the far better of the two brands I tasted, although I didn't get to compare it side by side with the Danesi Gold.

Campbell's was proudly displaying large cans of time saving "bases" for those who had customers to feed with a vengeance. Large cans of fat, starch and embalming fluid which you could make into your own unique dishes with, I suppose appropriately, pieces of dead animals.


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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I bet the bacon was nueskies, sampled at Debragga & Spitler

Nick

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I believe that was the bacon. I didn't really look to see if it was there booth or their distributor. Nearby was Marcel & Henri's charcuterie francaise. I have a suspicion that this place has been featured on Bouland's A la Carte web site. I should check. The had an andouillette sausage product that was made of tripe, but unlike the true French version, this one appeared to have the ingredients all ground up.


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Meredith Kurtzman the pastry chef at Esca demo'd Ricotta Fritters with Poached Quince. The fruit (quince) has never tasted so good. And I cook a lot with it. I could have eaten all 100 plus portions of the fruit by myself. :shock:

edit: Meredith, if you read this thread... I am craving the quince. It was amazing. Thanks for your great long effort in poaching it so perfectly. :smile:

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