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Kentucky Derby 2008 Menu


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I do a traditional Kentucky Derby party (2 weeks away) every year. Its a great way to get the Grill fired up. BBQ galore! Chicken and Ribs, a Pork Butt with sauce made from the drippings in the drip pan. I like a good spicy vinegar BBQ sauce. Potato Salad with dill relish and mustard, Baked Beans, Tomato & Cucumber tossed in balsamic, Grilled Veggies, Derby Pie, Mojitos and of course, Mint Julips.

What could I add to this? I usually like to make something new and different.

Something unexpected.

Veni Vidi Vino - I came, I saw, I drank.
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Having hosted several Derby day parties over the years, we have asked the same question. The only Kentucky signature dish we came up with was burgoo. It's a stew type thing with as many variations in recipes as there are people who make it, I think. Here's a good source of basic burgoo information. http://www.burgoo.info/

A web search will find many recipes. Since it's a big one pot dish, it's great for a party.

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How about grilled grits since you will have the grill going?  They are different and you can make various toppings.

Actually this was done by Chef Jack from Jeaquimo's in New Orleans at a friend of mine's party he catered. He served shrimp and grits with the grits grilled to reheat after letting them cool down and cut into squares. It was the the best dish offered and he had many wondrous things on the grill, the oysters were next best IMO, he also did a seven steak gumbo and a couchon de lai <sp?> So not really something that would surprise my guests. But a great suggestion never the less. His Shrimp and Grits inspired a series of my friend and I preparing and serving them at every occasion we cook at after that party.

gallery_55239_5394_180837.jpg

Edited by RAHiggins1 (log)
Veni Vidi Vino - I came, I saw, I drank.
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At the beach last year we did a tray of cheese grits with a sauted andouille in the center and then a raw shrimp pushed down in the top over each sausage slice. Let cool, grilled and served with a garnish. I did not have any left and just a disposable pan to throw away.

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Ok, this in no way goes with your menu (well, I guess it could, if you wanted it to), but the Derby doesn't seem like the Derby without good country ham biscuits. You need a good country ham, like Critchfield's (if you want to stay authentically Kentucky), sliced thin and served on homemade biscuits...with or without a mustard-based sauce. You might not want this with your BBQ menu, but I just thought I'd throw it out there for future reference.

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Traditional Derby Foods are: Country Ham, beaten biscuits, Asparagus, Spring Lettuces, Strawberries and Derby Pie. Leg of lamb and fruit and wine jellies (jellied fruit juices, not Jell-O) would not be amiss, anything you think of as spring.

Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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One of my favorites for Derby Day was a recipe shared years ago when a Kentuckian used to host the original Sunday night food chat on AOL back in the early 1990s. (Sorry, I can't immediately recall her name, but she was a really pleasant person. I've always wondered if she stayed with food communication.)

She called it Rebecca Sauce, and I've served it at many a Derby party since. You combine powdered sugar with a little bourbon, vanilla and a wee bit of cream to make a thick dip and serve it with fresh strawberries and a bowl of additional powdered sugar. Dip the strawberry in the sauce and then in the sugar.

Be careful -- it's potent, so make sure it's not put where children or people in recovery might stumble upon it.

And one other note, you know the story about Derby pie, right? Here in the newspaper business, we've gotten used to not using that name. Many years ago, there was a Louisville businessman who actually copyrighted the name. He would send out out messages threatening legal action whenever you ran the recipe. So many of us call it Country Pie or Chocolate Pecan Pie because of that.

Kathleen Purvis, food editor, The Charlotte (NC) Observer

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Ok, this in no way goes with your menu (well, I guess it could, if you wanted it to), but the Derby doesn't seem like the Derby without good country ham biscuits.  You need a good country ham, like Critchfield's (if you want to stay authentically Kentucky), sliced thin and served on homemade biscuits...with or without a mustard-based sauce.  You might not want this with your BBQ menu, but I just thought I'd throw it out there for future reference.

Here is another source for excellent Kentucky country ham: http://www.scotthams.com/

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You need a good country ham, like Critchfield's (if you want to stay authentically Kentucky

Not to hijack, but I found them while doing some non food related Christmas shopping as that is my last name. They are indeed cousins and we had a nice chat. Got some of the cakes for gifts.

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Oh wait....now that my brain has processed that....you bought the cakes for gifts.  Oh well!  I see the word cake and get all excited!

Sounds like a song:

If I knew you was a cousin

I'd a sent a cake, sent a cake

If I knew you was a cousin

I'd a sent a cake

How d'ya how d'ya do how d'ya do

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I found pork tenderloins on sale, whats a native berry that I can make a jelly to serve with it?

* Interpol has counter-manded the hijacking, this post will not make its next stop in Cuba. Although some Cuban sandwiches would be nice right now.

Cuban sandwiches!

Pork loin sliced very thin

Mojo creole marinade

Ham sliced thin

Swiss cheese sliced thin

Cuban loaf bread, cut long ways

marinate pork in mojo, layer pork, cheese, ham, cheese on cuban loaf.

Wrap in foil and place in a Pannini grill, let cook until cheese melts.

Best served with saffron rice and frijole's negros (black beans).

Alternatively go to "Little Havana" at North Druid and Buford Hwy. (behind fuzzy's)and order the #17

Edited by RAHiggins1 (log)
Veni Vidi Vino - I came, I saw, I drank.
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Hmm...a native berry....blackberries grow wild all over KY. In fact, we have a "blackberry winter", which usually refers to the last cold snap before warm weather truly sets in for good. I can't think of any other berry that screams Kentucky to me.

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Hmm...a native berry....blackberries grow wild all over KY.  In fact, we have a "blackberry winter", which usually refers to the last cold snap before warm weather truly sets in for good.  I can't think of any other berry that screams Kentucky to me.

Hmmm... Blackberry Bread pudding and a Kentucky Bourbon Sabayon?

Edited by RAHiggins1 (log)
Veni Vidi Vino - I came, I saw, I drank.
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Double vote for blackberries. I have a jar canned up by a neighbor on our farm property from the summer. Unopened and you are welcome to it.

Edit to add vote for blackberry bourbon glaze for the tenderloins.

Edited by Doodad (log)
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Double vote for blackberries.  I have a jar canned up by a neighbor on our farm property from the summer.  Unopened and you are welcome to it.

Edit to add vote for blackberry bourbon glaze for the tenderloins.

Where are you? Alpharetta?

Veni Vidi Vino - I came, I saw, I drank.
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Double vote for blackberries.  I have a jar canned up by a neighbor on our farm property from the summer.  Unopened and you are welcome to it.

Edit to add vote for blackberry bourbon glaze for the tenderloins.

Where are you? Alpharetta?

Yep and work in Norcross. I traverse Old Milton Pkwy all the way from Alphaghetto to P'tree Ind.

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Double vote for blackberries.  I have a jar canned up by a neighbor on our farm property from the summer.  Unopened and you are welcome to it.

Edit to add vote for blackberry bourbon glaze for the tenderloins.

Where are you? Alpharetta?

Yep and work in Norcross. I traverse Old Milton Pkwy all the way from Alphaghetto to P'tree Ind.

I live in norcross and work in Lawrenceville. My wife works downtown in the capital.

Veni Vidi Vino - I came, I saw, I drank.
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This is not an unexpected dish, but a traditional one. How about Kentucky Hot Browns? Not exactly fare for a BBQ, but fitting perhaps if you have guests over for brunch.

Hot Brown Recipe

Inside me there is a thin woman screaming to get out, but I can usually keep the Bitch quiet: with CHOCOLATE!!!

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