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Cooking with CIA's Garde Manger


Chris Amirault
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As has been mentioned around these parts, the CIA just published a third edition of Garde Manger: The Art and Craft of the Cold Kitchen. I've finally ordered a copy for myself, and I'm eager to start digging into the book, having consumed Charcuterie by Michael Ruhlman.

I'm wondering where to start in the book. Personally I'd like to hear about people's experiences with charcuterie, but I hope the topic itself can focus on all components of the book.

So: where to begin?

Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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As has been mentioned around these parts, the CIA just published a third edition of  Garde Manger: The Art and Craft of the Cold Kitchen. I've finally ordered a copy for myself, and I'm eager to start digging into the book, having consumed Charcuterie by Michael Ruhlman.

I'm wondering where to start in the book. Personally I'd like to hear about people's experiences with charcuterie, but I hope the topic itself can focus on all components of the book.

So: where to begin?

I started with the cured salmon and then corned beef. I need some equipment before sausage gets made.

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I have the second edition of the book, and haven't really seen the third yet (though it's on my wishlist). I have not tried any of the charcuterie, but I have made several of the more appetizer-like items in there, all of which turned out quite well. In particular there was a recipe for a composed crab salad that tasted great, and plated up beautifully using a ring mold (it had several brightly-colored layers that looked very "pro" on the plate). There was also a recipe for a chicken-salad-stuffed profiterole that was a big hit at parties last year: they were like little bite-sized chicken sandwiches on particularly tasty, crusty bread.

One of the other things I like about the CIA books are the more conceptual passages: more of a "how do I think about putting together a composed salad, or a sandwhich, or a charcuterie tray?" Those are very helpful to amateur's like me, who want to have a great dinner party, but have no idea where to begin.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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I have the new one. It is a little better. Some of the methods are different from the last one, some new photos. Wait for it to go on sale, somewhere. I have all of the CIA books, not because I am a crazy idiot grad, but because I have this crazy "book thing" my mother was a librarian and books somehow have become a hobby now. I have a larger collection than most Borders food and wine sections.

Anyways, it is a little better. I have done lots of recipes. I write in the margins during my process...so if you want to ask about a certain one. I had a great chef for Garde class and a couple of them he changed the quantities on and method - I don't know why, and I have not looked to see if it was updated in this one YET.I did a lot of recipes in that book especially. The CIA soup book, most of them. Baking - it appears to be the same stuff that we had given to us in class. I rarely bake that kind of stuff. Prochef - seems to get better everytime they come out with one. The info is the same most of the time, pics change. All of the home books - grilling - vegetables and a couple others are all in ProChef it seemed.

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  • 3 weeks later...

As depicted here, I made the sweet Italian, hot Italian, kielbasa, and andouille sausages from GM. Some initial notes.

After being schooled by Ruhlman, whose tone is very affirming and friendly, I'm appreciative of the "do this, do that" tone. In particular, I appreciate explicit instructions about time for creating the bind (different speeds, times, and expectations), and I really stuck to the 28-30F demand.

The flavor balance on all of these formulas seemed just right. I had gotten used to needing to do major tweaking all the time, and I didn't do any for this batch.

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 7 months later...

I made the Bavarian Bratwurst (not to be confused with the German or Swiss Bratwurst recipes also included in the book!): as detailed here I was very happy with the flavor, though I prefer bratwurst with a bit finer texture (the book recommends using the medium plate).

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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