Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Mexican'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Society Announcements
    • Announcements
    • Member News
    • Welcome Our New Members!
  • Society Support and Documentation Center
    • Member Agreement
    • Society Policies, Guidelines & Documents
  • The Kitchen
    • Beverages & Libations
    • Cookbooks & References
    • Cooking
    • Kitchen Consumer
    • Culinary Classifieds
    • Pastry & Baking
    • Ready to Eat
    • RecipeGullet
  • Culinary Culture
    • Food Media & Arts
    • Food Traditions & Culture
    • Restaurant Life
  • Regional Cuisine
    • United States
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • India, China, Japan, & Asia/Pacific
    • Middle East & Africa
    • Latin America
  • The Fridge
    • Q&A Fridge
    • Society Features
    • eG Spotlight Fridge

Product Groups

  • Donation Levels
  • Feature Add-Ons

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


LinkedIn Profile


Location

Found 459 results

  1. I just picked up a five pound bag of fresh masa (no, I don't know if it's truly fresh, or reconstituted masa harina, but that's a discussion for another topic). Now, last time I made tamales with this stuff I ended up using something like one pound total, and that made as many tamales as I could make by myself at one time. Until I can find a volunteer labor force to assemble a larger quantity of tamales, I am looking for things to do with the rest of the masa. It's labeled "Masa para tamales," but it's not "preparada": it's only got corn, water and cal on its ingredients list. Can I use it for tortillas? What else?
  2. Per Cristina Barros and Marco Buenrostro in today's Itacate column in La Jornada: www.jornada.unam.mx/2009/03/31/index.php?section=opinion&article=a08o1cul Diana Kennedy's latest and long-awaited book on the cuisines of Oaxaca is finally out. Since Amazon does not have the title listed as an advance copy, I can only wonder whether it is now out in Spanish, shortly to appear in English. No surprise here, but Barros & Buenrostro seem to feel that she has really hit another one out of the park. I can hardly wait to get my hands on my promised copy. Excited regards, Theabroma
  3. Welcome to eG Cook-Off 46! Click here for the Cook-Off index. We spent the last Cook-Off perfecting french fries, delightful yet leaning toward the one-dimensional. This time we're shifting gears and making the multi-dimensional Mexican dish, enchiladas. The variations on enchiladas are endless-there doesn't seem to be one "definitive," classic, enchilada recipe. They can be filled with beef, pork, chicken, smoked duck, smoked turkey or steamed octopus. An enchilada might be slathered with melted cheese, sprinkled with queso fresco, or have no cheese at all. It seems as though the only thing that enchiladas have in common is that all versions are wrapped in some type of tortilla. There are lots of possibilities for saucing an enchilada, everything from what one finds in a can on the supermarket shelf to homemade salsas using dried chilies. And of course, the variety of dried chilies to use for the sauce -- from mild to devil hot -- is also endless. In her definitive Art of Mexican Cooking, Diana Kennedy describes the two methods for making enchiladas. In one, you lightly fry the tortilla before dipping it into sauce; the process is reversed in the other. For both versions, you then fill the sauced and fried tortilla and roll it up. Kennedy's enchiladas placeras are sauced with a garlic, serrano, and tomato salsa and then filled with shredded beef; her enchiladas de Santa Clara uses an ancho and garlic sauce and an egg and cheese filling (and sounds delicious). Enchiladas benefit from corny, lardy homemade tortillas but also can mask mediocre ones to good effect, and they are an excellent way to showcase a perfect salsa. The previous main enchilada topic can be found here. You can also find topics on making tortillas at home here and a pictorial topic on Making Mexican at home is here. I've eaten hundreds of enchiladas in restaurants, but I was never able to duplicate that "restaurant-quality" enchilada flavor at home. My tortillas were either mushy or were too cold and broke when I rolled them with the filling. I also didn't want to serve my enchiladas with the requisite mushy beans and marginal "Spanish rice." What would be a unique side dish for Enchiladas? And what tortilla recipes would best stand up to the abuse of enchilada manufacture?
  4. Panosmex

    Mero

    From Pátzcuaro, México: For Friday's dinner, I'm planning on making Filetes de Pescado a la Veracruzana. Our local pescadería offered tilapia, cazón, huauchinango and mero. I haven't used mero before. I Googled it, and it seems to be grouper. How would that work for pescado a la Veracruzana? I like the thick, meaty filets. Tilapia is out of the question, as I find it nearly tasteless and lacking is substantial texture. Cazón may be fibrous, in my limited experience with it. Huauchinago is expensive, over $130 pesos the kilo! Maybe I'll revert to Plan A: fried, breaded fish filets, Southern catfish style, oven-fried potatoes, slaw, tartar sauce, pickled chow chow, and corn bread. Saludos, Panosmex
  5. aprilmei

    Kimchi tacos

    I read online articles in the New York Times and LA Times about kimchi tacos. Has anyone here ever eaten them, and if so, would you have any idea on how to make them? They sound delish but I probably won't have the chance to eat at these taco trucks anytime soon because I live in Hong Kong. From the descriptions, it doesn't sound as simple as just putting kimchi and kalbi in a corn tortilla. If anyone can help with a few clues on how to make these, I'd be grateful. Here are the links: http://www.latimes.com/theguide/restaurant...0,4560062.story http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/25/dining/25taco.html TIA
  6. My nephew and his wife are coming to town from NY (after having lived in Barcelona for 13 years) for the opening of his film in LA and they've asked me (Auntie Foodie) to take them to lunch at an authentic Mexican restaurant beforehand somewhere near the theater in Santa Monica. Does anyone have any ideas?
  7. Florida

    Chorizo Seco

    I just returned from the local Mexican market. While I was there I noticed something I've never seen before - Chorizo Seco. This sausage is darker (almost the color of blood sausage) and drier (hence the "seco") than your average Chorizo, but it is clearly still a fresh sausage. It is in a natural casing and was refrigerated. It does not appear to be cured. Can anyone give an explanation as to the difference? Is it a regional specialty? Do you cook it up the same as regular chorizo? Is it used in specific dishes?
  8. I was in Santa Fe recently, and had this amazing chili at a cafe on the plaza. It was the spiciest chili I ever had, but not just spicy, intensely flavorful too. Just looking for a recipe that might replicate this...I feel like New Mexican chili powder is different from the stuff you buy in like a Safeway.
  9. jsmeeker

    Queso dip

    It's on the menu of pretty much every Tex-Mex joint. Even Mex joints and joints that aren't really either. I would much prefer to make this with real cheese and not Velveeta or whatever. I can even be white instead of yellow. In fact, white would be nice as I have a block of Chihuahua in the fridge and some tortilla chips in the cupboard. Is it like make a bachamel based cheese sauce? Flour and butter to make roux. Then some milk. Then add in grated cheese? What do I do to "spice it up"?
  10. I am in search of a great Denver Mexican market. I've got H-Mart for Asian, Bombay Bazaar for Indian, Internal Market (on Parker) for Middle Eastern, but I'm not sure what to do for Mexican. I see carnicerias all over the place, but how do I pick the right one? Does anyone have a good suggestion for me? I'd just like to be able to find authentic ingredients to augment the paltry selection at my local Albertsons. Thanks!
  11. I'm doing an aphrodisiac meal for Valentines Day and someone recently mentioned this liquor to me, but I've never heard of it. Can someone fill me in. I hear its orange and sweet. Can I get more details than that? Thanks
  12. This article claims that there has been a "great Mexican tortilla crisis" due in large part to an increased price of corn secondary to the use of corn as a biofuel. Has there in fact been such a "crisis" in Mexico? If so what are the perceived causes? Has the promotion of corn based ethanol in gasoline been a factor?
  13. jsmeeker

    Maseca masa harina

    I was in my local Fiesta Mart this weekend and decided I ought to pick up some Maseca as I've seen it called for as an ingredient in some things, even if it wasn't to make dough for tortillas. So, looking at the shelves, I spied a small bag. It said "Amarilla" on it, along with a proclamation that it was "NEW!" Not knowing exactly what that meant, I compared that bag to the larger bag of Masaca. I couldn't tell the difference. Since I have limited storage space at home, I decided to just pickup that smaller bag. Now, I am not totally sure what I have. Here is what I got. http://aztecamilling.com/OurBrands.aspx?ID=139 How exactly is this different than the other stuff? If it's a little different, can I use it as a direct substitution for any recipe that simply calls for Maseca (or instant masa harina)
  14. If you could only read and use one cookbook on mexican cooking, which author would you choose and why? How would you characterize the difference between these two cookbook authors?
  15. Just wondering if anyone knows of a store that has a good stock of Mexican ingredients? I find it so frustrating having no clue whatsoever, especially seeing as Mexican is one of my favourite cuisines and I'd really like to make use of my Mex cookbook! There must be one somewhere because I do recall watching the Mexican episode of Food Safari and aha! there they were in a Mexican food store. Here's hoping the prices aren't sky high.
  16. Daniel

    Taco Mix

    We have gone a few times in the last couple of months.. It never has disappointed..Great tacos.. A little table in the back, the place is a small rectangle.. Counter running across the length where you can stand and eat your taco.. Free guacamole, free radish, free salsa verde.. Taco pastor, carnitas, pollo, cecina, lengue, they have it all..A couple of really interesting sandwiches.. The last time I was there these two guys ordered chorizo and cheese sandwiches.. It came with with lettuce, tomato, and some sauce.. Looked pretty awesome.. The tacos are $2.50 instead of the standard $2 bucks at most Mexican Places catering to Mexican's.. But you get a lot more meat then most places.. Really nice lettuce and salsa added on too.. Spinning wheels of meat are always a good sign:
  17. I saw a starter review in the Record for Rosa Mexicana at the River Side Sq Mall. As anyone been there yet? I wonder if it will be a mob scene like every restaurant there when it first opens.
  18. I will be traveling to Mexico City at the beginning of September to judge a coffee competition and was thinking about staying on a few more days to see if I can join a cooking class in the city. I have some basic experience making simple Mexican fare such as guacamole, tacos, quesadillas, mole almendrado, but I would like to take a class that gets deeper into the cuisine and was hoping someone here might have some recommendations. Ideally, the class would run between 1 to 3 days and be taught in English (my Spanish comprehension is decent but by no means fluent). Group or individual instruction is fine. Thanks!
  19. I have some clients going to London in August and are asking for recommendations for a good Mexican restaurant. They are staying in Kensington, but anywhere in London would work. Thanks Patti
  20. ulterior epicure

    Artisanal Mexican Sandwiches

    I don't *think* there's a thread devoted to this yet. This looks like it has great potential (from Chicago Dish): Can we just fast forward to April 2009?
  21. howdy folks from mexico im looking at purchasing a combi oven here in guadalajara and would like to hear from combi oven users regarding a few tips and recipes the oven im looking at is made by a mexican outfit called san-son they do have a good reputation im extremly interested in any help whatsoever kind regards bruce byng chef and owner of teatro limon puerto vallarta
  22. Not from the area. Could anyone tell me where it is? Thanks!
  23. bobmac

    Tough Ropa Veja

    Made ropa veja with flank steak and it was deliciously but so tough that my wife joked the ropa obviously means rope. Given that flank steak ain't known for being tender, is this pretty much it? I assume skirt steak would be similar.
  24. Batard

    Mexican Bay Scallops

    I was at my local Fresh Fields (a variant of Whole Foods) today, and saw that they had fresh "Mexican bay scallops" at an amazing $6.99 a pound. They are "in season". The fishmonger said they were fresh, dry scallops when I asked, and they sure look like it. Has anyone ever heard of this seasonal variety before? I tried searching the I'net, and came up empty. And I have not seen them anywhere else. Any info on this variety would be welcome. Thanks.
  25. There are very few places in Texas that continue to make the crispy puffy taco shell that I remember from my youth. In Houston, only Fiesta Loma Linda on Telephone Road is still doing this. I discovered the secret of making these this week. When I was helping Robb Walsh with recipe testing for The Tex-Mex cookbook, we tried to duplicate the taco shell using Maseca without any success. Recently I was enjoying my tacos at Loma Linda and I asked who they bought their masa from. They told me and a week later I went by that facility and asked "I'd like to buy the masa like Loma Linda uses to make their crispy tacos." The guy told me that they "only do the yellow corn masa on Mondays". Here, I finally had my smoking gun. On the drive back down Harrisburg to my home I pulled into another tortilleria and bought 5 lbs of yellow corn fine grind masa. I pressed out some tortillas, deep fried them and they puffed up magnificently. So, the 'secret' of crispy puffy taco shells is preserved for future generations.
×