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lovebenton0

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  1. ok. i've used some of our fennel before, in garlic and fennel mashers, carrot soup, roasted carrots and fennel, sausage and fennel... but i really would like to expand this. i have a lovely fennel that grows, and grows, every year and i'm just not using it in all the ways i could be. my bulbs don't look like the pics i've seen, but they look like what we get here at market, not round but spatulate. not the best pic of the bulbs growing, but you should have seen me trying to get down like that. fennel bulbs, stalks, fronds, seeds.... any suggestions???
  2. Acorn Squash with Apricot Nutty Rice Serves 6 as Side. Great for stuffing partially baked acorn squash halves, then finish baking stuffed with the rice, this is also good baked in a casserole. But then you miss the lovely squash. 3 acorn squash 1 small box wild rice (1/2 cup) 1/2 c brown rice 3-1/2 c water 1/2 tsp salt 1 T butter Orange/Peach/Mango juice 3 T brown sugar 6 dried apricots, diced 3 T butter 1/3 c broken pecan pieces 1 tsp ground cinnamon 1/2 tsp ground ginger 1 large egg 6 pecan halves dipped in butter for garnish Bring to boil wild/brown rice together in water w/salt and butter. Reduce heat to low and cover, cook for 50-55 minutes. Meanwhile halve acorn squash lengthwise and remove seed pulp. Make a thin cut on the bottoms so the squash will sit upright after stuffing. Rub squash halves with a little cinnamon/ginger and brush with melted butter, including the bottom cut. Place cut side down on baking sheet and bake at 350 for 20 to 25 minutes or until the squash is beginning to soften. Drain water from rice into measuring cup. Add enough orange/peach/mango juice (or OJ blend of your choice) to make 2/3 cups. Add diced apricots and pecan pieces to rice. Mix brown sugar, cinnamon, ginger, butter, and egg with juice. Pour juice mixture over rice. Stir lightly, until rice is coated. Scoop into 6 acorn squash halves (or into a 1 1/2 qt casserole if preparing alone). Bake at 350 for 30-40 minutes. Garnish: Dip pecan halves for garnish in melted butter and top each mounded squash bowl after 20 minutes baking time. The first time I tried this -- one of those oh so carefully planned and executed T-Day creations (based on my pantry at the moment ) -- I used all brown rice for the stuffing. Still very good but not as kicked up and nutty as the wild rice combo suggested by Richard Kilgore. I have made it this way ever since. Keywords: Side ( RG1204 )
  3. Acorn Squash with Apricot Nutty Rice Serves 6 as Side. Great for stuffing partially baked acorn squash halves, then finish baking stuffed with the rice, this is also good baked in a casserole. But then you miss the lovely squash. 3 acorn squash 1 small box wild rice (1/2 cup) 1/2 c brown rice 3-1/2 c water 1/2 tsp salt 1 T butter Orange/Peach/Mango juice 3 T brown sugar 6 dried apricots, diced 3 T butter 1/3 c broken pecan pieces 1 tsp ground cinnamon 1/2 tsp ground ginger 1 large egg 6 pecan halves dipped in butter for garnish Bring to boil wild/brown rice together in water w/salt and butter. Reduce heat to low and cover, cook for 50-55 minutes. Meanwhile halve acorn squash lengthwise and remove seed pulp. Make a thin cut on the bottoms so the squash will sit upright after stuffing. Rub squash halves with a little cinnamon/ginger and brush with melted butter, including the bottom cut. Place cut side down on baking sheet and bake at 350 for 20 to 25 minutes or until the squash is beginning to soften. Drain water from rice into measuring cup. Add enough orange/peach/mango juice (or OJ blend of your choice) to make 2/3 cups. Add diced apricots and pecan pieces to rice. Mix brown sugar, cinnamon, ginger, butter, and egg with juice. Pour juice mixture over rice. Stir lightly, until rice is coated. Scoop into 6 acorn squash halves (or into a 1 1/2 qt casserole if preparing alone). Bake at 350 for 30-40 minutes. Garnish: Dip pecan halves for garnish in melted butter and top each mounded squash bowl after 20 minutes baking time. The first time I tried this -- one of those oh so carefully planned and executed T-Day creations (based on my pantry at the moment ) -- I used all brown rice for the stuffing. Still very good but not as kicked up and nutty as the wild rice combo suggested by Richard Kilgore. I have made it this way ever since. Keywords: Side ( RG1204 )
  4. Sweet Potatoes with Plantains and Pecans 3 large sweet potatoes 4 plaintains (unripe to mid ripe-- mostly green to slightly yellow) 2/3 c pecan halves split Syrup 1 stick butter (unsalted) 1 c brown sugar 1 tsp cinnamon (ground) 1 tsp ginger (ground) 1/2 c apple cider plus 2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar Garnish: 12 pecan halves Thin slivers of *candied ginger (optional) Peel sweet potatoes, and cut in quarters. Cut each section in half (or 3 pieces if potatoes are very large). Cut plantains in half crosswise. Take a sharp knife and slit the plantain peels lengthwise. Remove peeling. Quarter plantains. Spray a 3 quart (or 9" x 13") glass baking dish with cooking spray. Arrange the potatoes and plantains so you have a piece of plantain for each two sweet potatoes pieces. Melt butter in saucepan, stir in brown sugar. Add the apple cider/cider vinegar to make a nice syrup. Stir in cinnamon and ginger. Cook on med low, stirring until well blended and slightly thickened. Add pecans to syrup. Ladle evenly over sweet potatoes/plantains. Top with the additonal pecan halves (and slivers of candied ginger, if using). Cover with heavy foil and bake for 45 to 50 minutes at 375 F. SP and plantains should be very tender but not mushy when done. Remove foil from dish, turn off oven, return dish for five minutes to set the glaze. *If the candied ginger seems hardened, soak in a little warm cider for a few minutes. Keywords: Side, Easy ( RG1203 )
  5. Sweet Potatoes with Plantains and Pecans 3 large sweet potatoes 4 plaintains (unripe to mid ripe-- mostly green to slightly yellow) 2/3 c pecan halves split Syrup 1 stick butter (unsalted) 1 c brown sugar 1 tsp cinnamon (ground) 1 tsp ginger (ground) 1/2 c apple cider plus 2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar Garnish: 12 pecan halves Thin slivers of *candied ginger (optional) Peel sweet potatoes, and cut in quarters. Cut each section in half (or 3 pieces if potatoes are very large). Cut plantains in half crosswise. Take a sharp knife and slit the plantain peels lengthwise. Remove peeling. Quarter plantains. Spray a 3 quart (or 9" x 13") glass baking dish with cooking spray. Arrange the potatoes and plantains so you have a piece of plantain for each two sweet potatoes pieces. Melt butter in saucepan, stir in brown sugar. Add the apple cider/cider vinegar to make a nice syrup. Stir in cinnamon and ginger. Cook on med low, stirring until well blended and slightly thickened. Add pecans to syrup. Ladle evenly over sweet potatoes/plantains. Top with the additonal pecan halves (and slivers of candied ginger, if using). Cover with heavy foil and bake for 45 to 50 minutes at 375 F. SP and plantains should be very tender but not mushy when done. Remove foil from dish, turn off oven, return dish for five minutes to set the glaze. *If the candied ginger seems hardened, soak in a little warm cider for a few minutes. Keywords: Side, Easy ( RG1203 )
  6. Taste-wise, I agree that's a better option. But then is it really coleslaw? I guess I have to start a new thread if I really want an answer. ← there are many different recipes for coleslaw. not all have that creamy tart/sweet mayo dressing. a spicy vinaigrette dressed slaw is very refreshing. a curried slaw is probably my fav. you're right... we could do a whole thread on different slaws alone.
  7. i have had good results using my oven with just the viewing light turned on also.
  8. my mouth is watering. why don't i have even one chicky in the house right now. i can almost smell it cooking and taste it from here, Susan!
  9. the baking soda actually does help the flour. the flour plumps a little bit while cooking, giving that nice thicker bready crisp coating. great cook-off everyone! i've just been lurking occasionally and was way behind, obviously. another thing i do for completely non-traditional fried chicken is to marinate the chicken pieces in (yes, bottled) bleu cheese dressing before dredging in flour and frying. no egg wash for that. marinate for about an hour, dredge and let sit for 30 minutes. then dredge lightly again and fry. very moist and tender chicken. add spices to flour as you like, we prefer the cajun spice mix i make but use whatever. ok.... sacrilege here, i know but this also works great if you want to oven-fry it. you can spray the pieces lightly with butter cooking spray before popping it in the oven. and i can't eat the pan-fried chicky very often.
  10. Great work, ladies! And you too, guys.... Delighted to see RecipeGullet back! Thanks for the big effort, know you've been working hard at this. Looks great!
  11. lovebenton0

    Easter Brunch

    Your second annual Easter parade. Sounds wonderful. And what a perk to be able to poke around the garden and see a few greenies poking their heads back up at you.
  12. There's some beautiful bread popping up here! Marcia, lovely S and yes, cute slash too on the roll. Corn breads, both of them, Elie and glossyp look wonderful as well as the Tuscan bread, Elie. OK. I confess.... I forgot all about posting a pic of the second boule when I cut it. The taste was a bit sweeter, and the crumb was chewier than the first boule baked the day before. I did remember that I posted this of the second boule in the dinner thread. We finished up the last of that boule yesterday as garlic toast -- a very good keeper. More bread tomorrow. Marcia, I knead by hand, but have used the FP to incorporate lliquid into the flour base a few times. Still knead after that. I find that 15 minutes total kneading time, i usually rest the dough, and myself after the forst 10 then for about 5 minutes then finish kneading. I use both the windowpane and the temp to gauge. Now that I have a good thermometer, I do. I used to just feel it. Same results, I've had plenty of practice feeling when the dough has come to life. But I do like the added assurance of the temp that I did not utilize before.
  13. Marlene, I think you're going to love this one!!! I do! Add one more for me -- belated Christmas gift received last night -- Art Fare: A Commemorative Celebration of Art and Food The Toledo Museum of Art Aides Stunning cookbook! Gorgeous food photography, and depictions of original art focus on celebrating the eye candy appeal of a well-presented meal and natural foods in painting, sculpture, and jewlery. Oh my, and the recipes look good too!
  14. grapes with chicken apricots with just about any kind of bird apples with pork and 'kraut raisins and currants in curry ham with citrus, or apple what about beef skirt for fajitas marinated with grapefruit orange with beef in salad or in savory braise with pepper and onion to offset the sweetness pummelo (my new fav citrus this season ) in salad with beef figs with lamb any bird and pork with cranberry
  15. I figured the way our winters jump around from fall to spring every week -- or day by day -- we'd have plenty to muse and chew about! Drizzle and warmish then misty and chilly -- all in one day -- again! So in the interest of a more pleasurable cooking environment the smoked brisket idea died and braised pork butt steaks with tomato, onion, cumin, cilantro, beer, and serrano were born! Topped with sour cream and our pickled jalapeno slices (so pretty, bright red and green), rolled in flour tortillas. Wow! Ten people here today and the six pounds of pork disappeared like <snap>! Baked black bean and (Monty Jack) white cheese dip, salsa, chips, casserole of chili-spiced rice with tatuma squash topped with slices of 'maters and cheddar cheese. Nice and spicy, nice and warm and dry for the cook!
  16. Yeah, it only works occasionally! Something in a cat's brain clicks off after about 25 or 30 minutes exposed to catnip -- survival factor? Think how dangerous it would have been for wild cats to be stoned all the time!
  17. lovebenton0

    Dinner! 2005

    Dinners over the past two days. Last night Mexcan-style Angus beef bottom round roast. Seared with bp/garlic/cumin, deglazed with cider vinegar (well, no beer on hand, but this worked very well). Braised with tomatoes, onions, roasted poblanos and a roasted jalapeno. Served with rice. Lots of sauce and meltaway tender. the night before Three cheese mac 'n cheese, salad with sliced pickled beets and a beet vinaigrette, hard boiled eggs sprinkled with Cajun seasoning, and I baked the second sourdough rye/cornmeal boule.
  18. lovebenton0

    Superbowl Food

    Potato soup would probably be good. Might check with them if you're considering it creamed, sometimes there's an issue with milk products after recent surgery. But you can make a damn fine pureed potato soup without the cream/milk. Menu sounds tasty -- and what would it be without clam dip for NE.
  19. I just ordered a load of seed! Far more than we need for this year of course, but I wanted the varieties so I just hit that checkout button and let the fun begin! Burpee has a little goodie that's like a mini greenhouse just for your seedlings. This will will be a life-saver (a plant life-saver! ) for me! As my Kats love all green things inside the house and just know I must have put them there for Kat toys (read: destruction! ). It's set up with 72 seed pots and starter thingies (like peat, but better they say) with a watering mat underneath and the all important LID to keep the Kats away! Looking forward to seed fun to begin next week. And, yes, fifi, my dear, there will be be baby pics coming.
  20. Thanks, Elie! The yellow on the barm is OO cooking spray. No, I did slash after proofing and wished I hadn't bothered to try. That usually goes like sssslick! But there was just enough heavy grain in the dough to make even my freshly sharpened knife want to pull so I just left it -- and as you see I didn't even bother to try it on the second boule. I usually slash when the dough is about 3/4 proofed and that gives it a lovely bloom. Like in my avatar. Bake and learn! And do you have pics of your Tuscan loaf, Elie? I want to try that one too. Perfect for my lo-sodium diet. What, if anything, did you smear on your Tuscan? Hmmm . . . Based on PR's comments on the bread (flat taste without salt so the Tuscans dip or smear in rich food) and your comment on the sweetness of yours, it might work to do the extra night in the fridge retarding it. Just as alternative to over-proofing, that is.
  21. lovebenton0

    Dinner! 2005

    Mmmmmmmmmm, spaghetttti! Looks like my kind of fingerfood! Tonight was cream of potato soup in a chicken stock base pureed with carrots and onions, allspice and black pepper, topped with onion confit. Oven-toasted sandwiches on homemade sourdough rye/cornmeal boule. The filling for the sandwiches was Muenster with a hot/sweet mustard I mixed up, and makeover from last night's dinner of shredded pork cooked with sauerkraut, sliced onions and apple, slosh of beer, splash of cider vinegar and brown sugar. Served that with buttered egg noodles tossed with carraway seeds and chopped parsley, a grind of black pepper. Mixed greens and veg salad, vinaigrette. On Monday we had massaman chicken curry, stir-fried bok choy and some tasty large shrimp/pork-stuffed "eggrolls" a friend dropped by, with lemon and hot pepper (jalapeno? serrano??) dipping sauce. She got these at a local restaurant I've never been to. But I want to go there now!
  22. Really no need to remove the tiles from your oven. They will make your oven more heat efficient if you just leave them in there -- better heat distribution. I bake anything on them if I need that rack. And they're the best for baked potatoes. A note on rising and proofing. I used my oven with only the oven light turned onn and door closed to provide a stable environment for both the initial rise of the dough and the proofing after shaping. Excellent! Reads at 80 degrees F. The kitchen gets too cold and drafty with the heat cutting off and on. I have been setting the dough in the cabinet beneath the wall oven. On days the kitchen is too cold (either in winter or due to AC which is certainly a problem!) I have occasionally turned on the oven and allowed it warm that cabinet area slightly. But what a waste of energy! Premium priced energy at that! So I did bake bread. I played a bit with the Basic Sourdough formula and made sourdough rye with cornmeal boules. I used some of my mother starter (which I keep fairly wet), to which I added a cup of rye flour and water to feed it a few days before, as the barm for the starter. This formula requires a firm starter -- like a biga, french bread dough consistency. I also added a cup of rye to the final dough and one half cup of cornmeal. I baked one boule on the second day (yesterday) and left one to retard again after shaping overnight in the fridge. That one I baked this afternoon. You'll see -- the texture of the crust is different. Baking method was the same. I started each one on the back side of a baking pan then carefully transferred it to the stone once the crust had set after the first ten minutes. Grain sourdoughs are more compact in crumb, but still should have variation there. Perhaps the first boule could have had more variation in the crumb but overall I was very pleased. I haven't cut the second boule yet. Firm starter, cut for mixing with final dough, on day two after overnight in fridge. First boule The crumb Second boule There is no sugar in this formula, yet the bread is both sourdough tart and sweet, good crunch to the crust. The rye and cornmeal make a nutty grain bread without being heavy. We liked it so much we had to have oven toasted sandwiches tonight for dinner with potato soup. Shredded pork cooked with sauerkraut, apples, onions and beer/cider vinegar, Muenster cheese, for sandwich filling. I made some hot/sweet mustard to go on these too. (That's onion confit topping the potato soup.) I'll post a pic of the second boule crumb after I cut it. You can see it in the pic --the crust of the second one baked with tiny flaky bubbles all over it, yet the crust is still hard beneath those. I'm curious to see if the taste was also affected by the extra night of dough retardation then proofing from the chilled state.
  23. I love it! What a phenomenal change from the kitchen it was. Sideboard -- with the snappy red pulls -- is very cool. How is that red KA working out?
  24. No, they have it surgically removed. ←
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