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Best Croissant in Paris


menton1
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Based on a survey of its culinary experts, Le Figaro has issued its short list of the best croissants in Paris. On one day, they gave tastings of 64 croissants to the team of experts. the top 4 were as follows:

1. Pierre Hermé. Top honors.

2. Le Triomphe, 95 rue d'Avron, 20e.

3. Laurent Duchène, 2 rue Wurtz, 13e.

4. Gérard Mulot, 76 rue de Seine, 6e.

Poilane finished 10th.

What's your favorite in Paris?

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At continental breakfast, Hotel de Buci (22 rue Buci) serves an unforgettable, buttery, million-layer, just-crisp croissant that shatters with every delicious bite. Or at least they did when I stayed there two years ago.

I don't know if it was made in-house or purchased.

Maria Gallagher

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Beauvallet et Julien at 6 Rue de Poissy in the 5th.

- croissants are light and fluffy and not crunchy nor taste like paper. I don't know why people thing croissants should be overcooked and burnt on the outside. Maybe it's the American in me that's raised on white bread ?

They also make a really great brioche that has a hint of lemon flavoring.

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What's the criteria for 'best'?

should a croissant be crisp or soft?

large or small?

(I confess to being a bit disappointed at the croissants at Poilane, and thought it was just me being a rube)

Pierre Herme's WERE really good, but I didn't know enough to know they were 'the best'. Laudree's were just as good, imho, where were they on the list?

k!

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Well I was going to let this one go unanswered because it's kind of embarassing to admit, but my favorite is from a little hole-in-the-wall place about 8-10 Rue du Poteau, in the 18th, called Au Petit T.... something or other that had such disgustingly huge and greasy (you can see the paper underneath quickly soaking up the heart-clogging stuff) croissants that I avoided them for 10 years. But in the spirit of exploration I finally bought one 5-6 years ago and while I can only get through a half, and that only about once a month, it is a devil's delight. It is light, usually warm, although I heat it up a bit, flaky and must be made with a ton of butter (not lard, I haven't stooped to eating his regular ones). Sinful, certainly not posh, but comforting after a chilly run.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Well I was going to let this one go unanswered because it's kind of embarassing to admit, but my favorite is from a little hole-in-the-wall place about 8-10 Rue du Poteau, in the 18th, called Au Petit T.... something or other that had such disgustingly huge and greasy (you can see the paper underneath quickly soaking up the heart-clogging stuff) croissants that I avoided them for 10 years.  But in the spirit of exploration I finally bought one 5-6 years ago and while I can only get through a half, and that only about once a month, it is a devil's delight.  It is light, usually warm, although I heat it up a bit, flaky and must be made with a ton of butter (not lard, I haven't stooped to eating his regular ones).  Sinful, certainly not posh, but comforting after a chilly run.

Now you've done it. I'm holding back from calling the airlines for the next flight to Paris. I always have breakfast at Laduree (on rue, Royale), a croissant avec confiture abricot and a cafe creme. Then a bagful of macarons to get me though the rest of the jour.

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It is light, usually warm, although I heat it up a bit, flaky and must be made with a ton of butter (not lard, I haven't stooped to eating his regular ones).  Sinful, certainly not posh, but comforting after a chilly run.

I don't think ordinary croissants are made with lard, though. I'm pretty sure they're made with vegetable shortening.

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