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Kerry Beal

Source of Countertop Confectionary Display Case

6 posts in this topic

Anyone know where to find a nice acrylic display case for chocolates, doesn't need refridgeration, and should sit on a counter top.

Even better would be a Canadian source of this.

Also wanted are the trays that chocolates are displayed on in a case such as this.

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Kerry- I've ordered some stuff from Hubert. I think their Canadian offices are in Ontario. I don't have the time to really look through their site now, but here are a few examples of what they have:

acrylic bakery display (scroll down)

I like these ones more

I'm sure I've seen pictures in their brochures with chocolate displays (maybe :rolleyes: ).

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Kerry- I've ordered some stuff from Hubert.  I think their Canadian offices are in Ontario.  I don't have the time to really look through their site now, but here are a few examples of what they have:

acrylic bakery display (scroll down)

I like these ones more

I'm sure I've seen pictures in their brochures with chocolate displays (maybe  :rolleyes: ).

Thank you both. Pam, I think that last one is going to be just what is required.

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Kerry, as another option...i've seen at most chocolate shops...the standard display is just using acrylic squares with chocolate on top. they then often stack these one on top of the other. there are a lot of places that make acrylic stands, simple bent acrylic rectangles that you can use like risers. it would be pretty inexpensive to use these items.

hey, are you finally going to sell some stuff?

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Kerry, as another option...i've seen at most chocolate shops...the standard display is just using acrylic squares with chocolate on top.  they then often stack these one on top of the other.  there are a lot of places that make acrylic stands, simple bent acrylic rectangles that you can use like risers.  it would be pretty inexpensive to use these items.

hey, are you finally going to sell some stuff?

Actually they are for my friend Mari who has Coco Chocolates. A really neat coffee shop in Toronto wants to sell her chocolates.

I love the acrylic square idea, but they want to keep peoples hands off these ones apparently.

I'll just stick to trying to sell my DVD's and classes. Although some holidays I make enough chocolate so that I can walk into the clinic or hospital with a box full and sell it as I going along. Helps support my chocolate habit.

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