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robyn

Culinary "Plagiarism"

4 posts in this topic

You have been quite outspoken about culinary "plagiarism" - especially when you think that people are copying your dishes.

Can you tell us what you think the boundaries are in terms of what a chef should or shouldn't do when it comes to another chef's ideas and creations?

I understand that you may currently be involved in litigation about this issue - so if you prefer not to answer - I understand. Robyn

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You have been quite outspoken about culinary "plagiarism" - especially when you think that people are copying your dishes.

Can you tell us what you think the boundaries are in terms of what a chef should or shouldn't do when it comes to another chef's ideas and creations?

I understand that you may currently be involved in litigation about this issue - so if you prefer not to answer - I understand.  Robyn

I'm not in litigation with anyone....Or not being so outspoken about it...........If we fry? and we didn't do it first is plagiarism? or boil? or bake?.......I will say no.........But don't tell the world WAS MY IDEA...........Do you know who made the first Chocolate souffle?....Well was Careme.......The great CHEF......So don't tell the world you did it !

But if you have 20 dishes, equal to the ones you developed, with innovations are yours and someone else in another part of the world tell that is theirs? Do you think this is right? It is not...But belive me.........IT doesn' take away a second of my time...........We keep doing and too bad for those people!

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Sorry about the reference to litigation. There was an article in the Wall Street Journal - which was mentioned here on Egullet. When Wikipedia wrote you up - it said - "[h]e is currently pursuing a complaint in a case of culinary plagiarism ostensibly committed by a former protege." Maybe when you get some time you can edit your Wikipedia entry <smile>.

If I understand you correctly - what you really object to is developing a dish - and then having another person passing it off as his own creation. Yes?

We recently went to a new restaurant in California called Tanglewood. It has a fair number of descriptions on its menu like this:

SWEET CORN AND CHANTERELLE "RISOTTO", JEREMIAH'S

BLACK BEAN CAKE - 11

(Vegetarian twist on a Jeremiah Tower Classic)

And this:

ROASTED SUMMER STEW, FRESH RICOTTA GNOCCHI

OR MARINATED TOFU - 15

(Hearty vegetarian or vegan selection, inspired by the Indian vegetarian dish, baingan bartha - a slowly-simmered ragout made from fire-roasted eggplant, tomatoes, onions, garlic, and spices. Gnocchi inspired by Judy Rodgers' recipe from Zuni Cafe)

And this:

BUTTERMILK FRIED WOLFE QUAIL, JICAMA, CARROT, AND CABBAGE SLAW, WITH HONEY BUTTERED MINI BISCUITS - 15 / 27

(The biscuit recipe is a tribute to James Beard's favorite biscuit recipe- his mother's)

Would you object if another restaurant took one of your ideas - and gave you credit for the dish on its menu the way Tanglewood does? Robyn

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Sorry about the reference to litigation.  There was an article in the Wall Street Journal - which was mentioned here on Egullet.  When Wikipedia wrote you up - it said - "[h]e is currently pursuing a complaint in a case of culinary plagiarism ostensibly committed by a former protege."  Maybe when you get some time you can edit your Wikipedia entry <smile>.

If I understand you correctly - what you really object to is developing a dish - and then having another person passing it off as his own creation.  Yes?

We recently went to a new restaurant in California called Tanglewood.  It has a fair number of descriptions on its menu like this:

SWEET CORN AND CHANTERELLE "RISOTTO", JEREMIAH'S

BLACK BEAN CAKE - 11

(Vegetarian twist on a Jeremiah Tower Classic)

And this:

ROASTED SUMMER STEW, FRESH RICOTTA GNOCCHI

OR MARINATED TOFU - 15

(Hearty vegetarian or vegan selection, inspired by the Indian vegetarian dish, baingan bartha - a slowly-simmered ragout made from fire-roasted eggplant, tomatoes, onions, garlic, and spices. Gnocchi inspired by Judy Rodgers' recipe from Zuni Cafe)

And this:

BUTTERMILK FRIED WOLFE QUAIL, JICAMA, CARROT, AND CABBAGE SLAW, WITH HONEY BUTTERED MINI BISCUITS - 15 / 27

(The biscuit recipe is a tribute to James Beard's favorite biscuit recipe- his mother's)

Would you object if another restaurant took one of your ideas - and gave you credit for the dish on its menu the way Tanglewood does?  Robyn

Never...In my menus tou find Freddy Girardet........Ferran Adria, Robuchon, etc.....but again not everything can have an attached name to it...But lets say you do a caramelize olive oil bon bon......Dont tell a newspaper is yours when this was done by me and my team....................

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