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3 days in New York


Barbara Moss
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We are from Chicago and do not often get to New york. We will be in New York in December for three days. I have eaten in several of the Danny Meyers places and my husband would love to go back to Grammercy Park. I would like to try some new places. I have not eaten at Cafe Boulud and was thinking of that. Not Per Se even if could get a reservations. i did not have a successful meal at the French Laundry. So what is out there? There are so many restaurants that it overwhelms me. I think I want one upscale and two a notch or two down. any suggestions?

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December might be a bad time to go to Gramercy Tavern, as they just changed chefs and, I believe, the new menu won't be set until January. (If I'm wrong about that, someone please correct me.)

But to me, the star Danny Meyers restaurant now -- and one of the star restaurants in New York -- is the renewed Eleven Madison Park under Chef Daniel Humm. I can't recommend it to you highly enough. Really. And I have a strong feeling that once it gets a New York Times review (which could happen any week), reservations are gonna get MUCH harder to come by.

Edited by Sneakeater (log)
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December might be a bad time to go to Gramercy Tavern, as they just changed chefs and, I believe, the new menu won't be set until January.  (If I'm wrong about that, someone please correct me.)

But to me, the star Danny Meyers restaurant now -- and one of the star restaurants in New York -- is the renewed Eleven Madison Park under Chef Daniel Humm.  I can't recommend it to you highly enough.  Really.  And I have a strong feeling that once it gets a New York Times review (which could happen any week), reservations are gonna get MUCH harder to come by.

I would second that. Eleven Madison Park is now a superb restaurant, one of the very best in New York. I am afraid that I do not feel that Gramercy Tavern is any longer of interest and has not been for some time. If you have only two days I would suggest Eleven Madison and Cru

Ruth Friedman

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I think Balthazar will give you a really good food experience and well as a great scene. I would consider it in your "notch or two down" category... brunch is great at Balt. as well.

The Batali suggestions are right on, but don't forget Otto as one of the options. And 'inoteca for lunch can be really wonderful and much less crazy than it gets at dinner time.

You wanna go lowbrow with Danny Meyer - then it's Blue Smoke. Great burger, decent to really good smoked stuff (I actually had the roast baby pig special on Monday night and it was great!), nice beer and bourbon selection at the bar, but the cocktails don't compare with GT, Pegu, Flatiron, donbert, et. al.

If you're staying anywhere near the upper west side, and want a quintessential NY breakfast experience, then Barney Greengrass is in your cards.

I really enjoyed our meal at Goblin Market - it's new and not on the radar too much yet, but a nice room with some good food. Also ate at I-Chin recently, but the room was d-d-d-dead...too bad, 'cause the food was so good.

Wanna get messy - Fatty Crab will do that, and most of the menu rocks.

Have fun!

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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Is Eleven Madison Park only pre-fixe or tasting? When I looked at the reviews that is what it seemed to be.

Last time I was there that was the case nd I believe it still is. When you compare it with other "fine dining" restaurants in NYC the prix fixe is very reasonable. Unless the policy has changed you can even take your own wine ($25 corkage). If you plan to do that check with them first.

Ruth Friedman

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another note on chef's who have left, although this happened a while back: andrew carmellini, who many would argue was the heart behind "cafe boulud" opened his own place "a voce". i've seen a couple of posts in the cafe boulud thread noting some difference in the food since he left.

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When you compare it with other "fine dining" restaurants in NYC the prix fixe [at Eleven Madison Park] is very reasonable.

Although more than one poster complained that the portion sizes on the prix fixe at EMP were inadequate, so that the prix fixe (as opposed to the tasting menus) was insufficient as a meal.

I never could understand people's complaining about a three-course prix fixe, BTW. How many times do you not order an appetizer, a main course, and dessert at a "fine" restaurant? (And, to be tendentious, I personally think that people who don't order dessert when they eat out should.)

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I would definitely suggest a Mario Batali restaurant. For an amazing Italian meal try the more upscale Babbo or casual but just as good Lupa. Casa Mono is a great bet as well for incredible, but much, much more casual tapas.

Really good meal in Babbo last week although Otto looked excellent and at frankly incredibley low prices. We had no trouble getting into Babbo for dinner - we were walking past, nipped in and got a 9.30pm reservation.

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When you compare it with other "fine dining" restaurants in NYC the prix fixe [at Eleven Madison Park] is very reasonable.

Although more than one poster complained that the portion sizes on the prix fixe at EMP were inadequate, so that the prix fixe (as opposed to the tasting menus) was insufficient as a meal.

I never could understand people's complaining about a three-course prix fixe, BTW. How many times do you not order an appetizer, a main course, and dessert at a "fine" restaurant? (And, to be tendentious, I personally think that people who don't order dessert when they eat out should.)

Some family members of mine were at EMP a couple days ago and ordered the prix fixe and loved it. They said the amount of food was more than adequate when I brought up the purported small portion sizes. If anything, they more than make up for it with extra courses. I've only done lunches and a tasting menu so I can't directly speak to the size of the three-course meal. The place is awesome though.

Edited by BryanZ (log)
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. . .

I never could understand people's complaining about a three-course prix fixe, BTW.  How many times do you not order an appetizer, a main course, and dessert at a "fine" restaurant?  (And, to be tendentious, I personally think that people who don't order dessert when they eat out should.)

What kind of a New Yorker are you? New Yorkers complain about everything and anything. What's to understand?

However, a fine meal without a fine dessert is simply defective in my opinion.

Edited by Bux (log)

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Oh, well. A fine meal shouldn't NEED a dessert. Maybe a little fruit.  I have decided on Cru, What is Otto? What is 'noteca? Do I want to go there? Someone has suggested Blue Hill. What do you think?

Blue Hill is awesome, one of my very favorite restaurants. Sophisticated, modern cooking of impeccably good ingredients, in a casual but elegant setting. On the other hand, Blue Hill provokes widely disparate reactions among knowledgeable diners, and if you weren't particularly impressed with The French Laundry it's possible it would not be to your taste. I have not been to TFL, but when I finally ate at Per Se recently I was struck by how similar our meat dishes (an earthy rectangle of pork belly with black eyed peas, and a sous vide veal breast with carrots and parsnips) were to the mains at Blue Hill, albeit with even higher quality ingredients (there are VERY few restaurants in New York for which you can say that). While there is the roast skin on the (extraordinary) chicken breast or occasionally crackling with the pork dish, the focus at Blue Hill is on gently cooked meat and very seasonal veggies, and not on brash flavors or big sauces.

As a side-note: what about WD-50? Obviously you have plenty of hyper-modern cooking in Chicago, but it provides an interesting (and in many ways very different, and certainly much more casual) counterpoint to Alinea. Unfortunately now that Sam Mason has moved on he won't be around to change your mind about dessert.

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Oh, well. A fine meal shouldn't NEED a dessert. Maybe a little fruit.  I have decided on Cru, What is Otto? What is 'noteca? Do I want to go there? Someone has suggested Blue Hill. What do you think?

Otto Enoteca and Pizzeria is a big, bustling restaurant via Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich; designed to resemble a train station in Naples, the offerings include pizza, pastas (all around $10), small appetizer plates of meat, vegetable, cheese or seafood, and of course, delicious house made, gelati and sorbetti for dessert. In addition, a fabulous wine list - lots of selections by the quartino, or glass and a half. It's a great room with some pretty good food.

'inoteca is a spin-off of the tiny West Village restaurant 'ino, which many regard as the place which really started the whole panini craze here in NY. Great sandwiches (the truffled egg toast may make you swoon), but the menu goes deeper than that, with insalata and antipasti, fritto, piatti, formaggi, and high quality salumi. And, once again, a deep Italian wine list. It can be quite a hassle to get a table in prime time, but lunch and early dinners are quite lovely, and the room is all windows on the corner of Ludlow and Rivington Streets, which provides for some great peple watching.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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I've been following this thread because I will be in NYC next week, but have to narrow my choices down to two!

I love great salads, and grilled or roasted vegetables and meats, and fresh pastas so I was thinking Blue Hill and Babbo and sitting at the bar, if possible.

But this requires me to be antisocial as a few colleagues want to eat at Mr. K's one night..sounds like maybe I should tell them about Grand Sichuan?

I haven't seen much in the threads lately about Davidburke and Donatella--this was recommended to me as well--thoughts?

Lastly (if you're still reading)...anyplace I should go for an exceptional chocolate/hazelnut dessert? Thanks!

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for a really delicious breakfast try Norma's at the Le Parker Meridian, the belgian waffle is delicious, the eggs benedict are great, and my favorite the Arepas are really wonderful.

B

and although its no Per Se or EMP, if you want to try something wonderful one night try Yakitori Totto at 55th and broadway for a great japanese cuisine experience.

Edited by Graphix (log)
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Oh, well. A fine meal shouldn't NEED a dessert. Maybe a little fruit.  I have decided on Cru, What is Otto? What is 'noteca? Do I want to go there? Someone has suggested Blue Hill. What do you think?

Define "fine meal." It shouldn't need dessert any more than it needs any other course, but there's a reason most fine restaurants have fine pastry chefs and I think most diners think of a fine meal as a series of fine courses, nicely served. As for Blue Hill, I tend to agree with Dave H. Blue Hill is my favorite restaurant in NYC and a contender for best restauurant in the city, but then again I was remarkable impressed with my one dinner at the French Laundry. By the way, Blue Hill, does not, I believe, have a resident pastry chef.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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I've been following this thread because I will be in NYC next week, but have to narrow my choices down to two!

I love great salads, and grilled or roasted vegetables and meats, and fresh pastas so I was thinking Blue Hill and Babbo and sitting at the bar, if possible.

But this requires me to be antisocial as a few colleagues want to eat at Mr. K's one night..sounds like maybe I should tell them about Grand Sichuan?

I haven't seen much in the threads lately about Davidburke and Donatella--this was recommended to me as well--thoughts?

Lastly (if you're still reading)...anyplace I should go for an exceptional chocolate/hazelnut dessert?  Thanks!

I would be antisocial and avoid Mr. K's - can't go wrong with either of your other choices, though!

I have a feeleing, similar to sneakeater's, that your colleagues would not appreciate (and may even not like) Grand Sichuan.

One of our fave chocolate/hazelnut desserts is the Tartufo at Lupa.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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