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Pigs' Feet

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Does anyone have the recipe for the pigs feet salad at Bistro Jeanty in Napa? I think that it's made with both the hocks and feet as it is very meaty.

Or for that matter, does anyone have any good pigs feet recipies of any ethnicity?

This wonderful, inexpensive cut seems to be unpopular in this country.

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Does anyone have the recipe for the pigs feet salad at Bistro Jeanty in Napa? I think that it's made with both the hocks and feet as it is very meaty.

Or for that matter, does anyone have any good pigs feet recipies of any ethnicity?

This wonderful, inexpensive cut seems to be unpopular in this country.

MMMMM.... Trotters!!! One of my favorite things to cook AND eat! So cheap. So simple. Yet sooooo much amazing flavor if cooked correctly. Ive got a great recipe for braised trotters we used to use at The French Laundry. If you, or anyone would like it, Id be happy to PM or email it to you. Its quite large (yet incredibly simple), hence my reason for not wanting to post it. We actually just broke a whole 90# pig the other day. On that note, we are doing a "Degustation of Birkshire Farms Pork." Crispy Braised Belly, Roasted Chop, and "Tete du Couchon". Simply amazing. On a side note, Gene Simmons is coming in this Saturday for his birthday and this is on his tasting menu! ROCK ON KISS!!!

Anyway, back to the subject at hand, the trotter recipe is basically a white braise, then cooled in the cuisson, then broken down. Id be happy to provide some more suggestions on how else to serve it.

-Chef Johnny

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my mom stews them in soy, sugar, garlic, ginger, green onion, white onion, sesame oil.

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ChefJohnny, I would also be extremely interested in this recipe.

Perhaps you should just post it here. Length should not be a problem; those that don't care for it can just skip over it.

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Does anyone have the recipe for the pigs feet salad at Bistro Jeanty in Napa? I think that it's made with both the hocks and feet as it is very meaty.

Or for that matter, does anyone have any good pigs feet recipies of any ethnicity?

This wonderful, inexpensive cut seems to be unpopular in this country.

MMMMM.... Trotters!!! One of my favorite things to cook AND eat! So cheap. So simple. Yet sooooo much amazing flavor if cooked correctly. Ive got a great recipe for braised trotters we used to use at The French Laundry. If you, or anyone would like it, Id be happy to PM or email it to you. Its quite large (yet incredibly simple), hence my reason for not wanting to post it. We actually just broke a whole 90# pig the other day. On that note, we are doing a "Degustation of Birkshire Farms Pork." Crispy Braised Belly, Roasted Chop, and "Tete du Couchon". Simply amazing. On a side note, Gene Simmons is coming in this Saturday for his birthday and this is on his tasting menu! ROCK ON KISS!!!

Anyway, back to the subject at hand, the trotter recipe is basically a white braise, then cooled in the cuisson, then broken down. Id be happy to provide some more suggestions on how else to serve it.

-Chef Johnny

I would love to have the trotter recipe as well as the braised belly if you would be willing to part with them. It's worth posting my email for. Where are you a chef?

jhabermann@msn.com

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As requested:

Pork Trotters

6 ea Pig trotters

1 kg WHITE mirepoix (onions, fennel, leek, pear/apple)

1 L White wine

4 L Chicken Stock

10 oz Apple Juice

10 ea Black peppercorns

20 ea Parsley stems

2 ea Bay leaves

1/2 bu. Thyme

2 ea Star anise

- Sweat mirepoix in EVO

- Add aromatics and wine -> Reduce to sec*

- Add trotters -> cover with HOT chicken stock

- Bring to boil -> Cover with cartouche and foil

- Braise @ 325F for 6 hours ( +/- )

- Cool in cuisson*

- Remove with spider -> strain, reduce, and reserver cuisson

- Clean trotters (remove bones, cartilage, and inside membrane, etc.)

- Reserve clean skin

Now, you can go a couple different ways at this point. You can serve it hot, the braised meat. I like to serve it with a simple cassoulet of white beans, tomato concasse, green beans, yellow wax beans, etc.) Or, you can brunoise* and fry the skin in a little butter until crispy. Add that to the shredded meat with 1# of buerre pomade*, chopped tarragon, chopped parsley, brunoise*, and some finished veal sauce*. Roll it into cylinders and you have an incredible trotter rillette.

* There are a few terms in this that people may or may not know, so heres a little explination.

- sec : Meaning to reduce a liquid until the pan is basically dry, but with still a little moisture left.

- cuisson : braising liquid

- brunoise : 1) a 1/16" dice

2) 1/16" of carrot, purple top turnip, and leek tops (refer to the French Laundy cookbook)

- finished veal sauce : At TFL , any "finished sauce" meant the finished fortified sauce of whatever dish it used for, i.e. veal, duck, lamb, squad, etc. A fine substition is demi glace or, even better, bordelaise sauce.

If you have anymore questions on this, feel free to ask! Enjoy the trotters!!!!! :)

-Chef Johnny

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Does anyone have the recipe for the pigs feet salad at Bistro Jeanty in Napa? I think that it's made with both the hocks and feet as it is very meaty.

Or for that matter, does anyone have any good pigs feet recipies of any ethnicity?

This wonderful, inexpensive cut seems to be unpopular in this country.

MMMMM.... Trotters!!! One of my favorite things to cook AND eat! So cheap. So simple. Yet sooooo much amazing flavor if cooked correctly. Ive got a great recipe for braised trotters we used to use at The French Laundry. If you, or anyone would like it, Id be happy to PM or email it to you. Its quite large (yet incredibly simple), hence my reason for not wanting to post it. We actually just broke a whole 90# pig the other day. On that note, we are doing a "Degustation of Birkshire Farms Pork." Crispy Braised Belly, Roasted Chop, and "Tete du Couchon". Simply amazing. On a side note, Gene Simmons is coming in this Saturday for his birthday and this is on his tasting menu! ROCK ON KISS!!!

Anyway, back to the subject at hand, the trotter recipe is basically a white braise, then cooled in the cuisson, then broken down. Id be happy to provide some more suggestions on how else to serve it.

-Chef Johnny

I would love to have the trotter recipe as well as the braised belly if you would be willing to part with them. It's worth posting my email for. Where are you a chef?

jhabermann@msn.com

OK, heres the belly recipe... its a little bit more involved than the trotters, but well worth the effort!! And, BTW, I am currently Chef de Poisson @ the El Dorado Kitchen in Sonoma CA. Before that I was at TFL, and Ill be Chef de Poisson @ Per Se starting in January!!

Pork Belly

Brine:

6 L Water

600 g Kosher Salt

600 g Honey

110 g Pink/Curing Salt

3 heads Garlic, split

3 bn. Thyme

6 ea. Bay leaves

1 tbsp. Black peppercorns

*REFER TO TROTTER RECIPE FOR WHITE BRAISE*

-Take belly off cure -> rinse

-Sweat mirepoix in EVO

-Add white wine -> reduce to sec

-Cover with HOT chicken stock -> bring to boil

-Braise @ 325F until tender

-Cool in cuisson

-Clean belly

-Press between hotel pans with 4 or 5# of weight

-Portion belly -> Score fat side -> High heat -> Fat down -> Flip -> Add pat of butter, thyme sprig, and crushed garlic clove -> baste -> drop in oven for 2-3 minutes

Again, any questions, just ask! :)

-Chef Johnny

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Sorry I don't have a recipe handy but my mother used to make pigs feet in aspic for my father when I was a kid (Studynets in Ukrainian) It grossed me out at the time since my father would eat it for breakfast.


Edited by Taboni (log)

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As requested:

Pork Trotters

6 ea  Pig trotters

1 kg  WHITE mirepoix (onions, fennel, leek, pear/apple)

1 L    White wine

4 L    Chicken Stock

10 oz  Apple Juice

10 ea  Black peppercorns

20 ea  Parsley stems

2 ea    Bay leaves

1/2 bu. Thyme

2 ea    Star anise

- Sweat mirepoix in EVO

- Add aromatics and wine -> Reduce to sec*

- Add trotters -> cover with HOT chicken stock

- Bring to boil -> Cover with cartouche and foil

- Braise @ 325F for 6 hours ( +/- )

- Cool in cuisson*

- Remove with spider -> strain, reduce, and reserver cuisson

- Clean trotters (remove bones, cartilage, and inside membrane, etc.)

- Reserve clean skin

Now, you can go a couple different ways at this point. You can serve it hot, the braised meat. I like to serve it with a simple cassoulet of white beans, tomato concasse, green beans, yellow wax beans, etc.) Or, you can brunoise* and fry the skin in a little butter until crispy. Add that to the shredded meat with 1# of buerre pomade*, chopped tarragon, chopped parsley, brunoise*, and some finished veal sauce*. Roll it into cylinders and you have an incredible trotter rillette.

* There are a few terms in this that people may or may not know, so heres a little explination.

- sec : Meaning to reduce a liquid until the pan is basically dry, but with still a little moisture left.

- cuisson : braising liquid

- brunoise : 1) a 1/16" dice

                  2) 1/16" of carrot, purple top turnip, and leek tops (refer to the French Laundy cookbook)

- finished veal sauce : At TFL , any "finished sauce" meant the finished fortified sauce of whatever dish it used for, i.e. veal, duck, lamb, squad, etc. A fine substition is demi glace or, even better, bordelaise sauce.

If you have anymore questions on this, feel free to ask! Enjoy the trotters!!!!! :)

-Chef Johnny

Thank you so much for the recipies. And congratulations on the NY job (where I live, and would love to snag a reservation). I do have three questions. 1) How far do you reduce the cuisson? It will be very viscous from the gelatin of the meat. 2. What is Beurre pomade? 3. For the cassoulet, do you bake all the ingredients with a bread crumb crust or do you assemble the cooked ingredients together without further ado.

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ChefJohnny, thank you for the great recipes. I have a question about the belly - 110 gms is a lot of pink salt! Are you sure it's not 10 gms? How long do you brine it for? Is that recipe for one whole, skin-on belly?

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mmm I love pigs feet.

I don't have a recipe either, but my mother puts them into a pressure cooker until tender and then cools them off in the fridge until cold (not cool). They gelatinize and are a little more chewy and easier to peel. Then you dip the meat into a mixture of salted briny shrimp and chili flakes. My mother is Korean, however I am not sure this is an authentic korean recipe.

They taste best with a cold beer or soju, so they are only meant to be a drinking snack

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A classic preparation is Pierre Koffman's "Pieds de cochon aux Morilles"

Braised pigs trotters stuffed with a mousse of chicken, sweetbreads and morels.

He bones the trotters before braising, I normally bone mine after, Any opinions on which is better?

There are essentially two routes, after braising

a) Yummy melting unctuousness, served as a braise, either Chinese style or boned and stuffed as above;

2) Bread-crumbed and fried or grilled until crisp. For example Midsummer House serves a Salad of Smoked Eel and Crispy Pigs Trotters, where the meat from the pigs trotter is reformed into cubes and then bread-crumbed and fried.

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for my presentation last year at IACP with Fergus henderson.. I began cooking my way through his book from Nose to tail...

there are some great recipes there, too many to copy down.

I did the braised belly, one of my favorites.. and also for IACP did a trotter.. HEADCHEESE.

Cook it like Chef Johhny says..

then I gathered the pork pieces and seasoned with some of the broth.. grated orange rind, chili pepper (to taste) and some chopped parsley.

Made mini.. versions for home..

did a few trotters.. ( foto's and info on my whole hog blog) and then put gauze in small zip lock bags.. wrapped it all up and tied it and left overnight in the fridge.

Poked holes in bag to let extra liquid out.

( I made soprasatta with Dario Cecchini in panzano in huge quantities..)

then unwrapped and it was perfect!

HAve fun!

I also recently ate some fabulous chinese style pork belly when in California at Va di VI

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I love pig's feet too! My dad used to brown them, then braise them in a Chinese fermented shrimp sauce. That skin was sooo good, and I loved the gelatinous texture of the er, trotter part. I haven't had them in a long time, because he stopped making them when his doctor told him to lay off the fatty food. I had trouble finding them when I moved out on my own, and now that I know where to get them, Mr. Duck, who will eat almost anything, won't touch them. :sad:

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Mmmmm, and what about the classic Chinese new mother recipe for ginger and black vinegar pig's feet? Mmmmm, that pungent, sweet, and slightly tart flavor is so good with the gelatinous trotters.

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Mmmmm, and what about the classic Chinese new mother recipe for ginger and black vinegar pig's feet? Mmmmm, that pungent, sweet, and slightly tart flavor is so good with the gelatinous trotters.

Oh, I totally forgot about those. Hest88, what is the significance of the “new mother” dish? I think my mom made it occasionally, so it's been even longer since I've had that dish!!

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Thank you so much for the recipies. And congratulations on the NY job (where I live, and would love to snag a reservation). I do have three questions. 1) How far do you reduce the cuisson? It will be very viscous from the gelatin of the meat. 2. What is Beurre pomade? 3. For the cassoulet, do you bake all the ingredients with a bread crumb crust or do you assemble the cooked ingredients together without further ado.

Thanks for the congrats!! Wish me luck. LOL Anyway, 1) I reduce the cuisson by half, or, depending on the application, reduce to a glace. And you are correct about all the gelatin, so be careful not to reduce it too much. 2) Beurre pomade- Take a pound of butter and let it sit out to room temp. Next put it in a big mixing bowl and lightly whip it with a spatula until very soft and creamy. It acts as a binder of sorts. 3) For the cassoulet, start with the white beans and just a little chicken stock/water in a pot. Bring to a boil and slowly emulsify some butter, essentially making beurre monte a la minute. then add the rest of the ingredients and serve hot. Hope that helps!

-Chef Johnny

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ChefJohnny, thank you for the great recipes.  I have a question about the belly - 110 gms is a lot of pink salt!  Are you sure it's not 10 gms?  How long do you brine it for?  Is that recipe for one whole, skin-on belly?

That recipe is for about 3-4 bellies. My apologies for not stating beforehand. The 110 g is correct, given the amount of water and number of bellies. Brine the bellies for roughly 12 hours, or overnite. You can omit the curing if you like, with results just as good!!

-Chef Johnny

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chefjohnny I love pigs feet too! My recipe is pretty basic Southern style, but tasty. Your recipe is off the hook. However, for some bizarre reason I've been craving pickled pigs feet. Any chance you have a recipe for that? Every recipe I've found calls for cooking them, but I don't think they're actually cooked, just pickled as the ones I've eaten are still kind of, well, pink. :rolleyes: Any and all advice is appreciated.

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DEMO: Pig's Trotter

I thought we needed some pictures.

gallery_7620_135_183741.jpg

The local butcher supplied two pigs legs. These are Tamworth, and incredible value for money: they were about 50p each, roughly a dollar each, and enough meat to feed a family for a week. Ideal protein for impoverished students.

I separated them into the hocks and the trotters, Note the tendon to cut through

gallery_7620_135_8355.jpggallery_7620_135_24869.jpg

I'll freeze the hocks for another day: lots of delicious things. I particularly like the German ways: roast or grilled (Haxe) - mmm crackling- or Boiled (Eisbein), or cooked with beans, cassoulet style, or cooked char sui style or what you will...

The trotters are braised very simply: 2 Tbs soy, 2Tbs sweet wine (Mirin, or sherry. I use Madeira), ginger and spring onion, star anise if you like. They will make their own braising liquid. Braise at 90C overnight. They used to be cooked in the cooling bread oven.

gallery_7620_135_35275.jpg

Turn after 8 hours or so. Luscious stickiness in the making

gallery_7620_135_14583.jpg

More tomorrow, When falling apart cooked and cooled I'll bone them and stuff them with a mousseline forcemeat, and braise some more to finish.


Edited by jackal10 (log)

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jackal10, are you going to demonstrate the boning process?

(ok i know i'm like 12 years old, but i still can't believe i just wrote that sentence)

ahem. anyway, i always hear that the problem with trotters is getting all the bones out--that the process is a real pain. hence i've never done it. if there's a method to it, and you could demonstrate it while you're doing this, i'd sure appreciate it...

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chefjohnny I love pigs feet too!  My recipe is pretty basic Southern style, but tasty.  Your recipe is off the hook.  However, for some bizarre reason I've been craving pickled pigs feet.  Any chance you have a recipe for that? Every recipe I've found calls for cooking them, but I don't think they're actually cooked, just pickled as the ones I've eaten are still kind of, well, pink. :rolleyes:  Any and all advice is appreciated.

Sorry Diva, but I dont have a recipe for that one. Im sure there is one somewhere, just gotta find it! :) On a side note, I hail from the Richmond area. Nice to see another Southerner!! YAY

-Chef Johnny

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I'm so glad that I started this thread. Thank you for the fabulous pictures jackal. I look forward to more!

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Part 2:

This isn't as neat as it could be. I'm sure you can do better. Please post your results...

After an overnight slow braise:

gallery_7620_135_133318.jpg

Let it get cool enough to handle, but if it gets too cold it will stiffen up and set with all that gelatin

gallery_7620_135_41332.jpg

Boning is easy after cooking; the bones just fall out. Boning before cooking is a pain. The anatomy is basically shin and foot, complete with toenails, or alternatively a shortened version of forearm and hand. Lots of small metatarsal bones and hard pads between the joints. Split it down the inside centre - it was probably split here anyway from where they hung it in the abattoir. Try not to break the skin more.

gallery_7620_135_49368.jpg

The pile on the left are the waste bones; on the right is the succulent skin, with some meat and the tendons turned to sticky yumm.

Run your fingers through it again and remove any hard bits you might have missed.

gallery_7620_135_42849.jpg

The bones are replaced with a forcemeat which will hold it all together. Here is a simple chicken mousseline (raw chicken breast, egg white, cream, salt and pepper. Whizz the chicken and the egg white; keep cold; sieve and incorporate the cream). You can have much fancier stuffings, including morels, sweetbreads, truffle, and its nice to have some texture components in it. The chicken breast was the most expensive component of this dish, and you could make a poor mans version, just as nice, with say mushroom or panada, or even sausagemeat, so long as it sets when cooked to hold everything together. Lay out he trotter on some clingfilm, skin side down, and put on a spoonful of the filling.

gallery_7620_135_69441.jpg

Roll it up and reform the trotter;

gallery_7620_135_23872.jpg

Poach in the normal way to set the forcemeat. Here its with some gravy made from the cuisson;

gallery_7620_135_42779.jpg

Serve it with say mashed potato and cabbage; its hearty food

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The local butcher supplied two pigs legs. These are Tamworth, and incredible value for money: they were about 50p each, roughly a dollar each, and enough meat to feed a family for a week. Ideal protein for impoverished students.

A dollar each! Unbelievable. I really need to scope out nearby butcher shops next time I move...

Looks fantastic, Jackal.

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