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ldenney

Fred & Red's in Joplin, Missouri

22 posts in this topic

A few years ago, I had a friend originally from Joplin, Missouri. He used to bring bring back to Owensboro bricks of frozen spaghetti called "Spaghetti Red" from a place he described as a small diner in Joplin called "Fred and Red's".

It was great stuff. After he moved away from Kentucky, I looked up the phone number to Fred & Red's and begged them to ship me some Spaghetti Red", but they said they didn't ship food.

Has anyone ever had this delightful concoction? Any idea how I might get a brick or two?

Lee

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Well, considering that "Freds and Reds" and Joplin are up the turnpike about 90 miles, I might be willing to drive up and pick up an brick for you. I would have to ship it FEDEX next day which will be very pricy. Considering how HOT it is in these parts right now, I would suggest waiting until fall because it is perishable. Just pm me and we can work out details.


It is good to be a BBQ Judge.

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Thanks Joiei....I appreciate your fast response. I have sent you an email on the subject.

Lee

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Hey folks, if this exchange takes place, I'd love to see a report and most definitely a few pics, if possible.  I'm intrigued.

=R=

I would be happy to do that if an exhange takes place down the road.


Edited by ldenney (log)

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I love the stuff myself! Growing up in Wichita, several restaurants served "spaghetti red" which was, essentially, spaghetti with chili. Since the chili was typically Manning's and hence quite browner than the ubiquitous red Italian-American pasta sauce, I could never understand why it was called "spaghetti red." Decades later I finally had someone explain the Joplin restaurant originated it (at least anecdotally) and later yet I finally made a pilgrimmage.

If you want a close approximation and can find Manning's chili (in brick form, in your freezer secion, in a container that is reminiscent of White Wave's tofu) and boil some full-sized spaghetti (I think it's important to use 'fat' noodles rather than thin spaghetti, vermicelli or angel hair).

This is also the chili (or at least the style) served at the Wichita landmark, Nu-Way Cafe.

ETA: Here is a blurb I found on Fred & Red's.


Edited by moosnsqrl (log)

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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I've been living in Springfield, MO, right up the road from Joplin. Had no idea. Of course, I've got to try it as well.

Interesting!


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Thanks Moosnsgl. All makes perfect sense. I don't recall seeing Manning's chili here in the land of Wal-Mart and Kroger, but I will check for it. Is it only produced in frozen form, or is it also available in cans?

I appreciate the link to the article on Fred & Red's. Since they are closed in August, I guess a road trip from western Kentucky to southwest Missouri for "spaghetti red" this month would be a waste of time and valuable gasoline.

Thanks again for the information.

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Is it only produced in frozen form, or is it also available in cans? 

Thanks again for the information.

I've only ever seen it in frozen form. A quick google yields numerous references making me think that frozen brick chili is fairly widely available, even if it's not Manning's. Looks like another brand called Rudolph's is common.

All this talk about it has made me crave some and I need to hit the grocery for a few things later, so I'll pick some up and see if there's any useful contact info on the package.

jgm - are you out there? This stuff is such a Wichita "thing" perhaps you have some ideas?


Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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Sorry for the delay - it's not that I haven't been to the store in all this time - it's just been so bloody hot that chili was the farthest thing from my mind. Today's almost-fall-like breeze cleared the cobwebs from my memory, apparently (that and it was displayed at eye-level) so I finally got home with a brick-o-Manning's.

My previous attempts to search were thwarted by having forgotten that the business is actually named Manning-Clampitt. They don't have a website but I did find reference to them in a restaurant database. The contact info is included as is another tribute to the haunting memory and power of their chili, in the form of a review written by someone who lives in Atlanta but still recalls it fondly from high school days in the 60s.

I'll think of you at the dinner table tonight. :wink:


Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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Sorry for the delay - it's not that I haven't been to the store in all this time - it's just been so bloody hot that chili was the farthest thing from my mind.  Today's almost-fall-like breeze cleared the cobwebs from my memory, apparently (that and it was displayed at eye-level) so I finally got home with a brick-o-Manning's. 

My previous attempts to search were thwarted by having forgotten that the business is actually named Manning-Clampitt.  They don't have a website but I did find reference to them in a restaurant database.  The contact info is included as is another tribute to the haunting memory and power of their chili, in the form of a review written by someone who lives in Atlanta but still recalls it fondly from high school days in the 60s.

I'll think of you at the dinner table tonight. :wink:

\\\

Thanks for the update on Manning-Clampitt chili. Now I have two brands to crave.

I have unable to find frozen chili in my town. The canned stuff is an inadequate substitute.

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ldenney, I have two blocks in the freezer to send to you. PM me with details. The restaurant was a real throwback to another day. And the line went almost out the door when I met up with Jaymes there at 11:30am, we were trying to beat the crowd but didn't succeed. One of the waitresses we talked to has worked there for over 10 years and eats the chili for breakfast.

The plate of spaghetti red included spaghetti topped with a lot of chili, I opted for the beans, I kind of like them a lot, a plug for Rancho Gordo. We split an order of the Tamale spread which included three small homemade tamales topped with chili.

In all an interesting experience, if your driving down I-40 or driving historic US-66 then by all means stop off and check it out. Nothing but counter service, no tables, no booths. Service is Quick and with a smile. I don't know that I would make it a destination again. But anytime that I get to spend with the dynamic Jaymes makes it well worth while. You can order a hamburger with double cheese, if chili isn't your thing.


It is good to be a BBQ Judge.

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Did you get the PM I sent you? Or at least, I hope it made it through.

ldenney,  I have two blocks in the freezer to send to you.  PM me with details.  The restaurant was a real throwback to another day.  And the line went almost out the door when I met up with Jaymes there at 11:30am,  we were trying to beat the crowd but didn't succeed.  One of the waitresses we talked to has worked there for over 10 years and eats the chili for breakfast. 

The plate of spaghetti red included spaghetti topped with a lot of chili, I opted for the beans, I kind of like them a lot,  a plug for Rancho Gordo.  We split an order of the Tamale spread which included three small homemade tamales topped with chili. 

In all an interesting experience, if your driving down I-40 or driving historic US-66 then by all means stop off and check it out.  Nothing but counter service, no tables, no booths.  Service is Quick and with a smile.  I don't know that I would make it a destination again.  But anytime that I get to spend with the dynamic Jaymes makes it well worth while.  You can order a hamburger with double cheese, if chili isn't your thing.

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Did you get the PM I sent you?  Or at least, I hope it made it through.
ldenney,  I have two blocks in the freezer to send to you.  PM me with details.   The restaurant was a real throwback to another day.   And the line went almost out the door when I met up with Jaymes there at 11:30am,  we were trying to beat the crowd but didn't succeed.   One of the waitresses we talked to has worked there for over 10 years and eats the chili for breakfast. 

The plate of spaghetti red included spaghetti topped with a lot of chili, I opted for the beans, I kind of like them a lot,  a plug for Rancho Gordo.   We split an order of the Tamale spread which included three small homemade tamales topped with chili. 

In all an interesting experience, if your driving down I-40 or driving historic US-66 then by all means stop off and check it out.  Nothing but counter service, no tables, no booths.  Service is Quick and with a smile.  I don't know that I would make it a destination again.   But anytime that I get to spend with the dynamic Jaymes makes it well worth while.   You can order a hamburger with double cheese, if chili isn't your thing.

Yes I did, I will be in touch.


It is good to be a BBQ Judge.

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I'm glad to know I am not the only one who eats it for breakfast. I thought it a bit freakish even by my meager standards. I wish I had some right now. :rolleyes:


Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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ldenney,  I have two blocks in the freezer to send to you.  PM me with details.  The restaurant was a real throwback to another day.  And the line went almost out the door when I met up with Jaymes there at 11:30am,  we were trying to beat the crowd but didn't succeed.  One of the waitresses we talked to has worked there for over 10 years and eats the chili for breakfast. 

The plate of spaghetti red included spaghetti topped with a lot of chili, I opted for the beans, I kind of like them a lot,  a plug for Rancho Gordo.  We split an order of the Tamale spread which included three small homemade tamales topped with chili. 

In all an interesting experience, if your driving down I-44 or driving historic US-66 then by all means stop off and check it out.  Nothing but counter service, no tables, no booths.  Service is Quick and with a smile.  I don't know that I would make it a destination again.  But anytime that I get to spend with the dynamic Jaymes makes it well worth while.  You can order a hamburger with double cheese, if chili isn't your thing.

:blush: Hey, thanks for the compliment. And back atcha.

A couple of thoughts...

First, love the recommendation about if you're driving I-44 or "historic US-66..." Indeed, we see requests for appropriate stops along 66 all the time and this one is a dandy.

And second, when I heard that the chili is served over spaghetti, I was afeared that it might be sweet, like Cincinnati chili, but it wasn't. Just good ol' chili, like I prefer. And it really is very good.

The whole thing reminded me of St. Louis's popular breakfast dish, the 'slinger.' You order whatever you want for breakfast -- eggs whatever style, bacon or sausage, hash browns, toast, seriously whatever - and they put it on your plate and just when you think, "Yep, that's my favorite breakfast, okay," they ladle chili all over the whole thing - eggs and meat and potatoes and toast and everything - and then they sprinkle cheese and onions on top.

These silly Missourians.

But damn tasty.

:cool:


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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jgm - are you out there?  This stuff is such a Wichita "thing" perhaps you have some ideas?

Huh? Oh, yeah, I'm here!

I will be husband-less this weekend, and so will have a little time to look around for bricks of chili. All in the name of research, you understand... :biggrin:

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The slinger - boy that brings back a memory. I couldn't remember the name of the place our friend sent us for "hangover helper" the morning after an especially boozy wedding reception, but your description fits it to a tee. Is that common there? All this time I was thinking it was just one restaurant I was trying to track down (a very interesting diner, architecturally, somewhere south of Soulard, I think) but Jaymes' post makes it sound ubiquitous.


Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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Thanks Moosnsgl.  All makes perfect sense.  I don't recall seeing Manning's chili here in the land of Wal-Mart and Kroger, but I will check for it.  Is it only produced in frozen form, or is it also available in cans? 

I appreciate the link to the article on Fred & Red's.  Since they are closed in August,  I guess a road trip from western Kentucky to southwest Missouri for "spaghetti red" this month would be a waste of time and valuable gasoline. 

Thanks again for the information.

jgm updated another thread earlier today which reminded me that Kroger owns Dillon's (common grocery chain originating in KS) and Dillon's definitely carries the Manning-Clampett bricks, so you might be successful in persuading your meat mgr to order some. I've noticed, despite my earlier claim that they are frozen, that they are, in fact, in the meat case - not frozen - at our area Dillons. So, if you like what joiei sends your way, save the label (maybe wipe off the orange greasy tint :wink:) and go cozy-up to your meat guy (which, being a good eG person, you've probably already done).


Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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i appreciate the update and the advice. thanks. looking forward to some spaghetti red.

Thanks Moosnsgl.  All makes perfect sense.  I don't recall seeing Manning's chili here in the land of Wal-Mart and Kroger, but I will check for it.  Is it only produced in frozen form, or is it also available in cans? 

I appreciate the link to the article on Fred & Red's.  Since they are closed in August,  I guess a road trip from western Kentucky to southwest Missouri for "spaghetti red" this month would be a waste of time and valuable gasoline. 

Thanks again for the information.

jgm updated another thread earlier today which reminded me that Kroger owns Dillon's (common grocery chain originating in KS) and Dillon's definitely carries the Manning-Clampett bricks, so you might be successful in persuading your meat mgr to order some. I've noticed, despite my earlier claim that they are frozen, that they are, in fact, in the meat case - not frozen - at our area Dillons. So, if you like what joiei sends your way, save the label (maybe wipe off the orange greasy tint :wink:) and go cozy-up to your meat guy (which, being a good eG person, you've probably already done).

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Recently, an older friend here in SF, who went to high school and college in Joplin, was jonesing for some Spaghetti Red. As a surprise, I did some research to see how close I could come. In the course of that research, I noticed this thread, plus an article in Wikipedia (Fred & Red's apparently has now closed), what purports to be the authentic recipe (close variations of which appear on several sites, but I never did find the original source), a few interviews with Red and several reviews. Taking the linked recipe as my starting point, I reconstructed the dish using real ingredients rather than a seasoning mix. This probably means it no longer counts as authentic, but my friend was very pleased with the results, so I thought I'd share. It's an interesting chili precisely because it's so simple.

 

Saute 2 med chopped onions in 2 tbsp vegetable oil until golden, about 20 minutes; add 4 cl minced garlic and saute another minute. Add 3 lb ground beef (preferably chuck), 85% lean; saute until lightly browned. Add 4 c water, 4 oz crushed saltine crackers, 6 tbsp mild (and/or spicy) pulverized new mexico chile (and/or ancho, paprika, etc.), 2 tbsp cumin and 1 tsp each salt, black pepper and oregano. Simmer partially covered 1‑1/2 to 2 hours. Cook 1 lb spaghetti al dente in salted boiling water; drain; divide among plates or shallow bowls and spoon chili over. Traditionally served with dill pickle slices, chopped onion and saltine crackers, but I think bread-and-butter pickles work better (and don’t think the onion or crackers add much).

 

Note: The source recipe, as reported on other sites, makes much of using regular fatty ground beef. I've reduced it to 85% mainly because I don't like the mouthfeel of overly unctuous dishes. You can make your own decision. The real key to the recipe, imho, is the long simmer, which reduces collagen in the beef to gelatin. With that, you don't need the fat. Those same version, btw, insists you shouldn't use chuck, though it doesn't explain why. I'm quite certain chuck is right (because of its collagen content), so that's what I used and recommend.


Edited by pbear correct typo (log)
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Oops. Make that 85% lean ground beef. Sadly, yes, English is my first language.

 

ETA: Now fixed.


Edited by pbear (log)

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