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Tapioca Maltodextrin


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maltodextrin is a complex sugar, used a lot in sports drinks because its glycemic index is lower than other sugars (for those who would like to know: The glycemic index is a scale that rates how fast a particular sugar or starch raises your blood sugar in relation to a similer dosage of glucose. 100 means that your body metabolizes it as fast as glucose, 0 means the ingredient has no immediate effect on blood sugar) It has about 10% the sweetness of glucose. I would assume tapioca maltodextrin is the same, but they like to think that because they start with tapioca root that it is a more natural product. You really need a very high fat content for this to work. Any water in the mix and you end up with a slurry goopy mess.

Commercially, because it binds to fats and other similer molecules, Maltodextrin is used as a flavor carrier....I haven't ventured to try, but I bet if you put some of this stuff in cold smoking chamber you could get some mighty good smoke flavor in it, and then be able to use that a variety of ways. If anyone knows if this works I would love to hear about it.

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Tapioca Malto dextrin works with a lack of moisture/water. It will work sufficiently with caramelized sugar since all of the water has been cooked out.

I believe Alex Stupak did this for a special creme brulee dish while he was at Alinea.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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As promised

you can get the good stuff (Organic and vegan)

actually from Naturesflavors.com

there is a few sizes to choose from

PM me with any questions

there is a tapioca thread already started So I will continue any other posts I have over there

Thanks

Kevin J. Adey

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You can also try naturesflavors.com

they have a few smaller size options to choose from.

digijam- I have tried the microwave and it works great as long as you can use LOW power. High power and 30 min+ in the nuker = a small fire

one last thing

the one point that no one has brought up is that when you powder any of the foodstuffs that you have mentioned when you spoon it in your mouth it turns back into caramel or oil or whatever. very interesting I havent tried sour cream yet,

but it sounds very cool.

Kevin J. Adey

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  • 1 month later...
As promised

you can get the good stuff (Organic and vegan)

actually from Naturesflavors.com

there is a few sizes to choose from

PM me with any questions

there is a tapioca thread already started So I will continue any other posts I have over there

Thanks

I've been expermenting with the stuff. Took me several tries to get a soil with detectable flavor. The 2:1/starch:fat proportions don't work for me at all. it seems to dry out at around 3:1, but at that point the flavor (and color) is mostly masked by the starch.

My technique thus far has been to start the starch spinning in the robocoupe and then drizzle in the oil. Am I doind something wrong?

Also, anybody know how to work this with chocolate? I tried melting it and thinning it with veg oil. It made for a nice textured soil but the color was light brown and the flavor was barely detectable. Any help?

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I've been expermenting with the stuff. Took me several tries to get a soil with detectable flavor. The 2:1/starch:fat proportions don't work for me at all. it seems to dry out at around 3:1, but at that point the flavor (and color) is mostly masked by the starch.

My technique thus far has been to start the starch spinning in the robocoupe and then drizzle in the oil. Am I doind something wrong?

Also, anybody know how to work this with chocolate? I tried melting it and thinning it with veg oil. It made for a nice textured soil but the color was light brown and the flavor was barely detectable. Any help?

I'd suggest adding the starch to the oil, rather than the other way around, for quicker clumping. That way you can also initially add by eye, using as little as possible depending on your ingredients. Must admit I don't even use a blender for small quantities - just mash with a fork for a soil texture, then sieve for a powder.

I've found a ratio around 2:1 should work okay if mixed with a pure oil mixture, though if there's any water/moisture being used in the recipe more maltodextrin will be needed. As for taste and colour, it's really just matter of making sure the oil is strong enough not to get overly diluted by the bland starch.

What type of chocolate were you working with? I've had no problems with either white or dark - but both still give a good, strong taste (the dark choc does get more coffee coloured, but I can't really see a way to avoid that). Suspect milk chocolate might be a little bland, because that tends to rely so much on mouthfeel from the oil rather than strong flavour.

Wouldn't recommend adding any further veg oil as it just means you will need more maltodextrin to mop it up - with both the extra starch and oil further diluting the flavour.

The one problem I've found with maltodextrin is that the chewiness makes all the soils and powders a little samey, so it needs to be used quite sparingly. And some flavours work better with the texture than others - peanut butter and caramel work so well because they're the sort of thing that stick to the roof of the mouth in the first place.

restaurant, private catering, consultancy
feast for the senses / blog

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Part of me is tempted to scream out "What's wrong with real fresh fruit!!!" The other part is exeptionally curious.

Someone give me an easy method/recipe to try. I have to get my head around some of this stuff. If only to convince The Spouse I am indeed trying to poison him :wink:

Website: http://cookingdownunder.com

Blog: http://cookingdownunder.com/blog

Twitter: @patinoz

The floggings will continue until morale improves

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For small batches, I drizzle the oil into the zorbit in a small mixing bowl while mixing with a manual whisk. If fine powder is needed, I then sieve.

For increased flavor profiles, I use infused oils and essential oils. Hot mustard oil has become a current favorite but the flavor does diminish if not used fresh.

I obtain my zorbit from www.lepicerie.com.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I just bought some tapioca maltodextrin and have played with a few powders, but I am curious if it is possible to cook with these powders. I have heard of Bobby Flay doing a molten lava cake that reconstitutes in your mouth and would like to replicate it. I have not seen it, but the thought of the liquid center reconstituting in your mouth is very interesting to me.

Any help would be good.

I have also tried some veggie powders and found that if you mince the item well, and run it through the microwave at the lowest power setting while stirring it every so often, you can get a great powder. I usually will run it through a processor one more time after drying for a fine powder. I have done this with beets, tomatoes, carrots, and onions. Another option is to use a juicer, and dry the pulp using the same method. That also works quite well, it is a bit quicker due to lack of water content, and you can use the juice for another project.

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I can't imagine how maltodextrin could be used in the chocolate application you described, jasonsand. And I'm not sure what you mean by a liquid center reconstituting, since by nature reconstituting would mean to add water to. I'm skeptical but would love to see more background on the idea. Bobby Flay isn't exactly known for his hypermodern leanings.

And I'm really sounding like a broken record, but Ideas in Food just put out a couple short posts on N-Zorbit. Like many of us here they were having trouble making the flavors really pop rather than be muted by the starchiness. Apparently they had great success with a yuzu powder made from yuzu oil that sounds pretty awesome.

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A couple quick results:

Peanut butter: Great results, very peanut-y

Truffle Oil: Good results, though with no color the powder is kind of soulless on its own

Whole Milk Yogurt: Errrr, that one was messy

Bacon Drippings: A work in progress; it was the first thing I tried, and I ran out of bacon to render after a couple mishaps. I was, however, able to use the maltodextrin's fat absorbing capabilities in a more transparent way for a different take on a bacon powder.

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What's the difference between tapioca maltodextrin and other maltodextrin.

I.e I've seen maoltodextrin for £4 a killo but can't find a source (in small <= 1Kg) quantities of tapioca maltodextrin in the UK.

Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.

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Bacon Drippings: A work in progress; it was the first thing I tried, and I ran out of bacon to render after a couple mishaps.  I was, however, able to use the maltodextrin's fat absorbing capabilities in a more transparent way for a different take on a bacon powder.

Now that's an excellent idea. You can't have too many kinds of porky goodness.

What's the difference between tapioca maltodextrin and other maltodextrin.

I.e I've seen maoltodextrin for £4 a killo but can't find a source (in small <= 1Kg)  quantities of tapioca maltodextrin in the UK.

As I understand it most maltodextrin is derived from corn. I couldn't find a good UK source for the tapioca version, either, so just bought a 4lb box of the regular stuff (£12 from Body Active) to see if it would do the trick. It seems to work perfectly, though I'd be interested to know if anybody has tried both types.

restaurant, private catering, consultancy
feast for the senses / blog

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Bacon Drippings: A work in progress; it was the first thing I tried, and I ran out of bacon to render after a couple mishaps.  I was, however, able to use the maltodextrin's fat absorbing capabilities in a more transparent way for a different take on a bacon powder.

Now that's an excellent idea. You can't have too many kinds of porky goodness.

I think I'm stealing from Alinea, though I can't be certain. Someone mentioned a bacon powder in that thread, so rendered bacon drippings in tapioca maltodextrin just seemd to make sense. I think I went wrong when I tried to add a drop of liquid smoke. Maltodextrin really seems to hate water, a lot.

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  • 3 weeks later...
What's the difference between tapioca maltodextrin and other maltodextrin.

Okay, finally got around to get holding of some of Zorbit's tapioca maltodextrin, and can confirm there's quite a difference. The corn stuff is far gummier, lacking the creamy meltiness of the tapioca one. Probably worth owning both, as I can see the gummy texture working better with some flavours.

restaurant, private catering, consultancy
feast for the senses / blog

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terraspice.com just got back to me.

"The retail cost per pound is $16.96 and it is available in one pound increments. The price does not include shipping. You can place an order by emailing me at judy@terraspice.com with your shipping and payment information.

Thanks,

Judy"

They offer wholesale pricing to restaurants as well though I'm not sure what that cost would be.

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Wow!! I got mine last week at lepicerie.com for $8.80 a pound.

I emailed them too, but they haven't gotten back to me...what other kinds of stuff do they carry?

In the same line of Molecular Gastronomy products they carry all the usual suspects: sodium alginate, calcium chloride, fruits powders and everything else. I had read about it on foodite.com. But check for yourself their website they cary a lot of "hard to get" pastry products. www.lepicerie.com

I don't know how you were able to send them an email without going and checking their website java script:emoticon(':huh:')

smilie

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Bacon Drippings: A work in progress; it was the first thing I tried, and I ran out of bacon to render after a couple mishaps.  I was, however, able to use the maltodextrin's fat absorbing capabilities in a more transparent way for a different take on a bacon powder.

Now that's an excellent idea. You can't have too many kinds of porky goodness.

I think I'm stealing from Alinea, though I can't be certain. Someone mentioned a bacon powder in that thread, so rendered bacon drippings in tapioca maltodextrin just seemd to make sense. I think I went wrong when I tried to add a drop of liquid smoke. Maltodextrin really seems to hate water, a lot.

Here's my first attempt at bacon fat powder. Could've used a bit more maltodextrin and a good sieving, but otherwise turned out pretty well. Bacon-y, anyways.

I think that grinding cooked bacon with a small amount of maltodextrin would work a little better. Just enough to powder the excess fat, and still have all the good qualities of "real" bacon, color included.

Pic of bacon fat powder

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Here's my first attempt at bacon fat powder.  Could've used a bit more maltodextrin and a good sieving, but otherwise turned out pretty well.  Bacon-y, anyways.

I think that grinding cooked bacon with a small amount of maltodextrin would work a little better.  Just enough to powder the excess fat, and still have all the good qualities of "real" bacon, color included.

Pic of bacon fat powder

Mixing the bacon fat powder with ground bacon could work nicely, too. Just been doing something similar with white truffle oil powder, adding extra black truffle.

Have you tried re-cooking once it's mixed yet? Heating really helps bring the flavour of pork or bacon back out, and if you fry it in clumps rather than as a fine powder you can get a nice combination of crispy outside and melty inside.

Edited by Digijam (log)

restaurant, private catering, consultancy
feast for the senses / blog

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Here's my first attempt at bacon fat powder.  Could've used a bit more maltodextrin and a good sieving, but otherwise turned out pretty well.  Bacon-y, anyways.

I think that grinding cooked bacon with a small amount of maltodextrin would work a little better.  Just enough to powder the excess fat, and still have all the good qualities of "real" bacon, color included.

Pic of bacon fat powder

Mixing the bacon fat powder with ground bacon could work nicely, too. Just been doing something similar with white truffle oil powder, adding extra black truffle.

Have you tried re-cooking once it's mixed yet? Heating really helps bring the flavour of pork or bacon back out, and if you fry it in clumps rather than as a fine powder you can get a nice combination of crispy outside and melty inside.

Here's what I do for a bacon condiment I put on slow-cooked eggs. It conveys salt, smoke, and pork while adding some subtle texture. People really like it.

Cook bacon in pan until crispy but not burnt, drain, food process with salt and maltodextrin, dry in low oven, food process again with a bit more maltodextrin until you get a fine powder.

Obviously this is like a refined take on Bacon Bits. By drying in the oven you can drive off all the water and adding the maltodextrin allows one to absorb the remaining fat so you get a really nice, dry power.

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