Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
Kent Wang

Only a Chinese would eat it

Recommended Posts

Dejah -- you are correct. I am looking, out of curiousity, for a way to prepare an abundant summer pest into something I can eat. And all I can find online are general descriptions of the technique without specifics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here's a REALLY gross thing to eat.... Lobster!  It is so strange-looking, feeds on sewage, debris and dead things on the bottom.  No one would eat that, would they?

I agree. That also goes to creatures like crab and shrimp... creatures that feed on dead marine bodies.


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dejah -- you are correct. I am looking, out of curiousity, for a way to prepare an abundant summer pest into something I can eat. And all I can find online are general descriptions of the technique without specifics.

Sorry can't help with a recipe. Perhaps experimentation? First mix the jelly fish with plenty of salt, then take them out and sun-dry them?


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here's a REALLY gross thing to eat.... Lobster!  It is so strange-looking, feeds on sewage, debris and dead things on the bottom.  No one would eat that, would they?

I agree. That also goes to creatures like crab and shrimp... creatures that feed on dead marine bodies.

hummmmmm...I guess you also cannot eat fresh stream/lake trout, free range chickens, free range pork, etc., etc.

BTW most creatures eat other creatures/plants which in a chain eventually get back to dead creatures/plants.

however, I fully support your attitude...it allows the rest of us to enjoy the many gifts of nature as edible delights.

another thought...how well filtered is the water you drink? is it from lake, stream or reservoir sources? if so, think of all the crap which falls to the bottom before you get it!


Edited by dmreed (log)

The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How about pig's ears?  I don't know of any culture that eats them.  In the U.S., they're sold as dog chow.

I love them, by the way.

Traditional "Soul Food," the cuisine of the African American slaves, would use the castoff pieces like pig ears, trotters, and tripe.

As do the Greeks and the French.

I do see a lot of pigs ears and other less popular parts in shops that have a large African American clientel.

a lot of cultures eat/prepare pig ears including Asian and Latino cultures.


The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm wondering who else (as in which other cultures) eat chicken feet -I'm pretty confident there has to be others. I can't get enough of it! The black bean sauce that goes with it just tooo good for words...


Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well other people dont really eat it like the Chinese do, but many Jews (and other people) know of it's great broth making abilities. Chicken feet make an extremely delicious chicken soup.


BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the Philippines, we grill chicken feet and it is a popular street snack fondly called "Adidas".

In Korea, the feet is cooked with the fiery gochujang paste and is sold as an accompaniment to beer and soju.


Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here's a REALLY gross thing to eat.... Lobster!  It is so strange-looking, feeds on sewage, debris and dead things on the bottom.  No one would eat that, would they?

I agree. That also goes to creatures like crab and shrimp... creatures that feed on dead marine bodies.

hummmmmm...I guess you also cannot eat fresh stream/lake trout, free range chickens, free range pork, etc., etc.

BTW most creatures eat other creatures/plants which in a chain eventually get back to dead creatures/plants.

however, I fully support your attitude...it allows the rest of us to enjoy the many gifts of nature as edible delights.

another thought...how well filtered is the water you drink? is it from lake, stream or reservoir sources? if so, think of all the crap which falls to the bottom before you get it!

Well, I'm not really serious about the lobster being inedible - it's more that I see that there are many folks who'd eat lobster (with all its ugliness and unsavoury eating habits) at the drop of a hat, but wouldn't think of eating something that they are not familiar with even though it may be less weird or disgusting.


Gac

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here's a REALLY gross thing to eat.... Lobster!  It is so strange-looking, feeds on sewage, debris and dead things on the bottom.  No one would eat that, would they?

I agree. That also goes to creatures like crab and shrimp... creatures that feed on dead marine bodies.

hummmmmm...I guess you also cannot eat fresh stream/lake trout, free range chickens, free range pork, etc., etc.

BTW most creatures eat other creatures/plants which in a chain eventually get back to dead creatures/plants.

however, I fully support your attitude...it allows the rest of us to enjoy the many gifts of nature as edible delights.

another thought...how well filtered is the water you drink? is it from lake, stream or reservoir sources? if so, think of all the crap which falls to the bottom before you get it!

Well, I'm not really serious about the lobster being inedible - it's more that I see that there are many folks who'd eat lobster (with all its ugliness and unsavoury eating habits) at the drop of a hat, but wouldn't think of eating something that they are not familiar with even though it may be less weird or disgusting.


Gac

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In the Philippines, we grill chicken feet and it is a popular street snack fondly called "Adidas".

In Korea, the feet is cooked with the fiery gochujang paste and is sold as an accompaniment to beer and soju.

Both versions sound delicious, but I love the name in the Philippines: Adidas! :laugh::laugh:

Maybe I'll ask for them by that name next time...


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been living in China for about 4 years now, I eat anything (more or less), and have tried the following:

- dog hotpot (very, very popular down in Guangxi where I live)

- snake soup (looked cool, tasted very unspectacular)

- raw snake blood and rice wine (the worst thing I have ever tasted in my life)

- raw snake bile and wine (not as bad as the first, but pretty bad)

- smoked toads (I tried this in Zhejiang - surprisingly, most non-Zhejiang Chinese I've talked to think eating these 蛤蟆 would be disgusting)

- pangolin (a protected species - I didn't order it was angry that it was surprised on me)

- deep-fried scorpions (sounds crazier than it is)

- Sweet Wine with Rice 甜酒 (just odd, but you get to liking it after a few sips)

- fried pig's penis

- those little soft-shelled turtles (水鱼 - "water fish" - nice, incredibly misleading name to someone studying Chinese)

- Geoduck (taste like soft-shelled clams from the Chesapeake, only much bigger)

- Fresh-water snails (periwinkles? 螺蛳)

- Plus tons of Stinky Tofu, congealed blood, fish heads, preserved eggs and every other delicious (and non-endangered) thing Chinese cuisine has to offer

Seriously, China really is a country every food enthusiast should visit. And don't worry about language. A smile, a big ol' "NI HAO" and maybe a phrasebook will get you further than you think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are Chinese and Japanese (maybe Koreans too?) the only cultures who eat eels?  I don't think I have seen eels on the menus in other restaurants.

In Northern Spain, a certain kind of junior eel is a delicacy. They are called anguilas and are served in a variety of ways, for some they are the ultimate tapa, especially as they command such high prices nowadays.

In England, as has been mentioned, they are used in a traditional working class cockney dish called 'jellied eels'.

In the South West of England, what was once a dish for poor people is now strictly for gourmands. Just like in Spain, elvers (baby eels) now command top prices and are highly prized.

And lots of delicatessens now serve smoked eel in vacuum packed slices.

There is also some confusion as to whether a popular fish and chip option in the South East of England is eel. A fish known as 'rock salmon' (also called 'rock eel') is coated in batter and fried, but it's dogfish. The point of confusion is probably because fish and chip shops acquire this already skinned, which means it looks like eel (although the lack of bones is a great indicator that it isn't)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Monkey's Brain

I read these are also eaten in Mexico (possibly during ancient times? Not sure) and various countries in Africa (I personally saw a picture of someone's meal in Africa as well...bleh).

This reminds me of Anthony Bourdain. I really like how he puts into perspective that every cuisine has its oddities, it's just a matter of cultural point of view.


Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Monkey's Brain

I read these are also eaten in Mexico (possibly during ancient times? Not sure) and various countries in Africa (I personally saw a picture of someone's meal in Africa as well...bleh).

This reminds me of Anthony Bourdain. I really like how he puts into perspective that every cuisine has its oddities, it's just a matter of cultural point of view.

Some of my chinese friends used to find the idea of eating stinky cheese quite repulsive... the only way you could convince them to try was to argue that it was pretty much the same thing as stinky tofu. My partner, also of chinese origin, finds the amount of sugar used in western food quite repulsive too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Been living in China for about 4 years now, I eat anything (more or less), and have tried the following:

- pangolin (a protected species - I didn't order it was angry that it was surprised on me)

pangolins are very interesting creatures, they have a plate-like armor made of similar material to hair, nails and horns. The only one I've ever seen was stuffed at the Harvard museum. I've heard that they were eaten in some places but I wouldn't eat them when there are many non-threatended species to eat

Very cool animal though, almost looks prehistoric.


Professional Scientist (in training)

Amateur Cook

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last year on a trip to Taiwan, my family and I went to a Hakka restaurant, and were served what I thought was normal fare that I've eaten before. Until this dish came out.

gallery_39443_6375_333408.jpg

Bee larvae! :blink:

I was a bit reluctanat at first to try it, but as soon as I saw all my relatives happily chomping down on these delicate morsels, I gave it a go. It was like a light crunchy yet chewy on the inside peanut, and quite tasty!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Vegetable fungus, aka cordyceps. I had this in Hong Kong, quite tasty, an interesting texture.

I am a round eye Canadian. My eating habits are simple. I will eat anything that won't eat me first. :raz:

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh I love vegetable fungus. I had no idea what it was called in English but my mom puts it in soup for me all the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm wondering who else (as in which other cultures) eat chicken feet -I'm pretty confident there has to be others. I can't get enough of it! The black bean sauce that goes with it just tooo good for words...

Yes, in my country we do eat chicken feet and pork ears, feet and tail. I'm Brazilian.

Chicken feet is part of our traditional chicken soup, canja, and the above mentioned pork parts, make for a creamy feijoada.

The colagen realesed during the cooking makes everything taste better and enhances the food texture, although there is a trend for "light" -tasteless, bland- feijoada nowadays. Ugh...

BTW, on Saturdays we went to the Asian hood to get chicken feet at the Chinese grocery. Yummy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

During my time in Guangxi Province I saw people eating/drinking, as well as tried myself:

-lots of brains (still not fond of)

-lots of congealed mammal blood (became very fond of)

-bamboo rat (ok, i guess)

-softshell turtle - 水鱼 but not a fish at all (never liked)

-stinky tofu (i love this)

-periwinkles 螺蛳 (love these)

-snake blood with baijiu (the worst thing I've ever ingested in my life)

-snake bile with baijiu (bad, but not as bad as the blood)

-pangolin (still feel guilty, but didn't know what it was at the time)

-smoked toads (in Zhejiang, but liked them all the same)

-spicy duck heads (ok)

-dog hotpot (tasty)

-cat hotpot (never tried, and still wouldn't)

-several kinds of lizard (not worth the price to pocket and environment)

That said, I know plenty of Chinese who wouldn't touch half the stuff on this list. Then again, my girlfriend thinks bleu cheese is one of the foulest culinary inventions known to man.

My next business venture will be exporting MD-style Scrapple to China. I'm going to open stands all over China selling scrapple 肉夹馍 with Vietnamese iced-coffee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do Chinese eat fish eye balls from a steamed fish?


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      For the last several years Cindy's* job has been to look after me. She takes care of my residence papers, my health insurance, my travel, my housing and associated repairs. She makes sure that I am supplied with sufficient cold beer at official banquets. And she does it all with terrific efficiency and great humour.
       
      This weekend she held her wedding banquet.
       
      Unlike in the west, this isn't held immediately after the marriage is formalised. In fact, she was legally married months ago. But the banquet is the symbolic, public declaration and not the soul-less civil servant stamping of papers that the legal part entails.
       
      So tonight, along with a few hundred other people, I rolled up to a local hotel at the appointed time. In my pocket was my 'hong bao' or red envelope in which I had deposited a suitable cash gift. That is the Chinese wedding gift protocol. You don't get 12 pop-up toasters here.
       
      I handed it over, then settled down, at a table with colleagues, to a 17 or 18 course dinner.
       
      Before we started, I spotted this red bedecked jar. Shaking, poking and sniffing revealed nothing.
       
       
      A few minutes later, a waitress turned up and opened and emptied the jar into a serving dish. Spicy pickled vegetables. Very vinegary, very hot, and very addictive. Allegedly pickled on the premises, this was just to amuse us as we waited for the real stuff to arrive.
       
       
      Then the serious stuff arrived. When I said 17 courses, I really meant 17 dishes. Chinese cuisine doesn't really do courses. Every thing is served at roughly the same time. But we had:
       
      Quail soup which I neglected to photograph.
       
      Roast duck
       
      Braised turtle
       
      Sticky rice with beef (the beef is lurking underneath)
       
      Steamed chicken
       
      Spicy, crispy shell-on prawns.
       
      Steamed pork belly slices with sliced taro
       
      Spicy squid
       
      Noodles
       
      Chinese Charcuterie (including ducks jaws (left) and duck hearts (right))
       
      Mixed vegetables
       
      Fish
       
      Cakes
       
      Fertility soup! This allegedly increases your fertility and ensures the first born (in China, only born) is a son. Why they are serving to me is anyone's guess. It would make more sense for the happy couple to drink the lot.
       
      Greenery
       
      Jiaozi
       
      There was a final serving of quartered oranges, but I guess you have seen pictures of oranges before.
       
      The happy couple. I wish them well.
       
      *Cindy is the English name she has adopted. Her Chinese name is more than usually difficult to pronounce. Many Chinese friends consider it a real tongue-twister.
    • By Burmese Days
      Hello everyone,
       
      This is my first post, so please tell me if I've made any mistakes. I'd like to learn the ropes as soon as possible. 
       
      I first learned of this cookbook from The Mala Market, easily the best online source of high-quality Chinese ingredients in the west. In the About Us page, Taylor Holiday (the founder of Mala Market) talks about the cookbooks that inspired her.
      This piqued my interest and sent me down a long rabbit hole. I'm attempting to categorically share everything I've found about this book so far.
       
      Reading it online
      Early in my search, I found an online preview (Adobe Flash required). It shows you the first 29 pages. I've found people reference an online version you can pay for on the Chinese side of the internet. But to my skills, it's been unattainable.
       
      The Title
      Because this book was never sold in the west, the cover, and thus title, were never translated to English. Because of this, when you search for this book, it'll have several different names. These are just some versions I've found online - typos included.
      Sichuan (China) Cuisine in Both Chinese and English Si Chuan(China) Cuisinein (In English & Chinese) China Sichuan Cuisine (in Chinese and English) Chengdu China: Si Chuan Ke Xue Ji Shu Chu Ban She Si Chuan(China) Cuisinein (Chinese and English bilingual) 中国川菜:中英文标准对照版 For the sake of convenience, I'll be referring to the cookbook as Sichuan Cuisine from now on.

       
      Versions
      There are two versions of Sichuan Cuisine. The first came out in 2010 and the second in 2014. In an interview from Flavor & Fortune, a (now defunct) Chinese cooking
      magazine, the author clarifies the differences.
      That is all of the information I could find on the differences. Nothing besides that offhanded remark. The 2014 edition seems to be harder to source and, when available, more expensive.
       
      Author(s)

      In the last section, I mentioned an interview with the author. That was somewhat incorrect. There are two authors!
      Lu Yi (卢一) President of Sichuan Tourism College, Vice Chairman of Sichuan Nutrition Society, Chairman of Sichuan Food Fermentation Society, Chairman of Sichuan Leisure Sports Management Society Du Li (杜莉) Master of Arts, Professor of Sichuan Institute of Tourism, Director of Sichuan Cultural Development Research Center, Sichuan Humanities and Social Sciences Key Research Base, Sichuan Provincial Department of Education, and member of the International Food Culture Research Association of the World Chinese Culinary Federation Along with the principal authors, two famous chefs checked the English translations.
      Fuchsia Dunlop - of Land of Plenty fame Professor Shirley Cheng - of Hyde Park New York's Culinary Institute of America Fuchsia Dunlop was actually the first (and to my knowledge, only) Western graduate from the school that produced the book.
       

      Recipes
      Here are screenshots of the table of contents.  It has some recipes I'm a big fan of.
       
      ISBN
      ISBN 10: 7536469640   ISBN 13: 9787536469648 As far as I can tell, the first and second edition have the same ISBN #'s. I'm no librarian, so if anyone knows more about how ISBN #'s relate to re-releases and editions, feel free to chime in.
       
      Publisher
      Sichuan Science and Technology Press 四川科学技术出版社  
      Cover
      Okay... so this book has a lot of covers.
      The common cover A red cover A white cover A white version of the common cover An ornate and shiny cover  There may or may not be a "Box set." At first, I thought this was a difference in book editions, but that doesn't seem to be the case. As far as covers go, I'm at a loss. If anybody has more info, I'm all ears.
       
      Buying the book
      Alright, so I've hunted down many sites that used to sell it and a few who still have it in stock. Most of them are priced exorbitantly.
       
      AbeBooks.com ($160 + $15 shipping) Ebay.com - used ($140 + $4 shipping) PurpleCulture.net ($50 + $22 shipping) Amazon.com ($300 + $5 shipping + $19 tax) A few other sites in Chinese  
      I bought a copy off of PurpleCuture.net on April 14th. When I purchased Sichuan Cuisine, it said there was only one copy left. That seems to be a lie to create false urgency for the buyer. My order never updated past processing, but after emailing them, I was given a tracking code. It has since landed in America and is in customs. I'll try to update this thread when (if) it is delivered.
       
      Closing thoughts
      This book is probably not worth all the effort that I've put into finding it. But what is worth effort, is preserving knowledge. It turns my gut to think that this book will never be accessible to chefs that have a passion for learning real Sichuan food. As we get inundated with awful recipes from Simple and quick blogs, it becomes vital to keep these authentic sources available. As the internet chugs along, more and more recipes like these will be lost. 
       
      You'd expect the internet to keep information alive, but in many ways, it does the opposite. In societies search for quick and easy recipes, a type of evolutionary pressure is forming. It's a pressure that mutates recipes to simpler and simpler versions of themselves. They warp and change under consumer pressure till they're a bastardized copy of the original that anyone can cook in 15 minutes. The worse part is that these new, worse recipes wear the same name as the original recipe. Before long, it becomes harder to find the original recipe than the new one. 
       
      In this sense, the internet hides information. 
       
    • By liuzhou
      Perhaps the food-related question I get asked most through my blog is “What's it like for vegetarians and vegans in China. The same question came up recently on another thread, so I put this together. Hope it's useful. It would also, be great to hear other people's experience and solutions.
       
      For the sake of typing convenience I’m going to conflate 'vegetarians and vegan' into just 'vegetarian' except where strictly relevant.
       
      First a declaration of non-interest. I am very carnivorous, but I have known vegetarians who have passed through China, some staying only a few weeks, others staying for years. Being vegetarian in China is a complicated issue. In some ways, China is probably one of the best countries in which to be vegetarian. In other ways, it is one of the worst.
       
      I spent a couple of years in Gorbachev-era Russia and saw the empty supermarkets and markets. I saw people line up for hours to buy a bit of bread.  So, when I first came to China, I kind of expected the same. Instead, the first market I visited astounded me. The place was piled high with food, including around 30 different types of tofu, countless varieties of steamed buns and flat breads and scores of different vegetables, both fresh and preserved, most of which I didn't recognise. And so cheap I could hardly convert into any western currency. If you are able to self-cater then China is heaven for vegetarians. For short term visitors dependent on restaurants or street food, the story is very different.
       
      Despite the perception of a Buddhist tradition (not that strong, actually), very few Chinese are vegetarian and many just do not understand the concept. Explaining in a restaurant that you don't eat meat is no guarantee that you won't be served meat.
       
      Meat is seen in China as a status symbol. If you are rich, you eat more meat. And everyone knows all foreigners are rich, so of course they eat meat! Meat eating is very much on the rise as China gets more rich - even to the extent of worrying many economists, food scientists etc. who fear the demand is pushing up prices and is environmentally dangerous. But that's another issue. Obesity is also more and more of a problem.
       
      Banquet meals as served in large hotels and banquet dedicated restaurants will typically have a lot more meat dishes than a smaller family restaurant. Also, the amount of meat in any dish will be greater in the banquet style places.
       
      Traditional Chinese cooking is/was very vegetable orientated. I still see my neighbours come home from the market with their catch of greenery every morning. However, whereas meat wasn't the central component of dinner, it was used almost as a condiment or seasoning. Your stir fried tofu dish may come with a scattering of ground pork on top, for example. This will not usually be mentioned on the menu. Simple stir fried vegetables are often cooked in lard (pig fat) to 'improve' the flavour.
      Another problem is that the Chinese word for meat (肉), when used on its own refers to pork. Other meats are specified, eg (beef) is 牛肉, literally cattle meat. What this means is that when you say you don't eat meat, they often think you mean you don't eat pork (something they do understand from the Chinese Muslim community), so they rush off to the kitchen and cook you up some stir fried chicken! I've actually heard a waitress saying to someone that chicken isn't meat. Also, few Chinese wait staff or cooks seem to know that ham is pig meat. I have also had a waitress argue ferociously with me that the unasked for ham in a dish of egg fried rice wasn't meat.
       
      Also, Chinese restaurant dishes are often given have really flowery, poetic names which tell you nothing of the contents. Chinese speakers have to ask. One dish on my local restaurant menu reads “Maternal Grandmother's Fluttering Fragrance.” It is, of course, spicy pork ribs!
       
      Away from the tourist places, where you probably don't want to be eating anyway, very few restaurants will have translations of any sort. Even the best places' translations will be indecipherable. I have been in restaurants where they have supplied an “English menu”, but if I didn't know Chinese would have been unable to order anything. It was gibberish.
       
      To go back to Buddhism and Taoism, it is a mistake to assume that genuine followers of either (or more usually a mix of the two) are necessarily vegetarian. Many Chinese Buddhists are not. In fact, the Dalai Lama states in his autobiography that he is not vegetarian. It would be very difficult to survive in Tibet on a vegetarian diet.
       
      There are vegetarian restaurants in many places (although the ones around where I am never seem to last more than six months). In the larger cities such as Beijing and Shanghai they are more easily findable.
       
      Curiously, many of these restaurants make a point of emulating meat dishes. The menu reads like any meat using restaurant, but the “meat” is made from vegetable substitutes (often wheat gluten or konjac based).
       
      To be continued
    • By Chocolatemelter
      Hey everyone.
       
      So im looking for the most affordable chocolate shaking table that actually works.. does anyone have experience with the ones from AliBaba or china in general?
       
      i bought a $100 dental table from amazon but i guess its not the right hrtz cause it kinda works, but not well enough.
       
      im looking in the $500 range or under.. any advice? Thanks
    • By liuzhou
      I know a few people here know her already, but for those that don't, she is simply the best creator of Chinese food and rural life videos. It's not what you will find in your local Bamboo Hut! It's what Chinese people eat!
       
      Here is her latest, posted today. This is what all my neighbours are doing right now in preparation for Spring Festival (Chinese New Year to the Lantern Festival 15 days later), although few are doing it as elegantly as she does!
       
       
      Everything she posts is worth watching if you have any interest in food.
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...