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Jaymes

Taboule

75 posts in this topic

But what do you put in yours? And what do you serve it with?

Seems to me most "authentic" recipes call for a great deal more lemon and parsley than "Western" recipes. At least the ones I've seen.

So, what ingredients ALWAYS go into your Taboule Salad?


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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yes, yes, much more parsley than one usually gets in typical middle eastern places. and i always put in mint, too.

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I used to live near a Lebanese bakery that made fabulous food as well as bread and baked goods, and the best thing on the menu was their Tabbouleh. Lots and lots of parsley and mint, heavier on the lemon than the garlic, and the chopped tomatoes were just the right size. It used to be fabulous in a sandwich with hummous. Their pita bread was very thin and chewy.

I've tried to replicate it at home, but it never seems to come out right. The closest I've come is to use the Near East brand of Tabbouleh mix and doctor it up.

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The recipe I've used mostly:

3/4 cup of thin bulgur, soaked in water and strained

1 cup very finely chopped flat leaf parsley

1/3 cup very finely chopped peppermint

1 medium tomato, chopped very thin

juice from 2 lemons

1/4 cup olive oil (prefereably of a robust olive varietal)

salt and pepper

mix everything and adjust seasoning. It's very hard to speak of "authentic" tabouleh, but this results in something very similar to what you may get in the middle east.


M

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Apparently in Syria, it is sacreligious to add mint to Tabouleh.

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Few things, maybe dandelions, have more nutrients that parsley. Can tabouli save the world?


Edited by lissome (log)

Drinking when we are not thirsty and making love at all seasons: That is all there is to distinguish us from the other Animals.

-Beaumarchais

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The key, I think, to tabbouleh, is to refuse the temptation to stuff it full of bulgar wheat or some other grain (many recipes encourage this as, I think, a means of bulking out the dish, which is not the point). Really great tabbouleh is, as you say, primarily about the parsley and the way in which it mixes with the tomato, lemon juice, seasoning, olive oil and mint.

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The key, I think, to tabbouleh, is to refuse the temptation to stuff it full of bulgar wheat or some other grain (many recipes encourage this as, I think, a means of bulking out the dish, which is not the point). Really great tabbouleh is, as you say, primarily about the parsley and the way in which it mixes with the tomato, lemon juice, seasoning, olive oil and mint.

Very interesting.... amazing post... it brings me back to what my friend Mary Ann Joulwan, of Lebanese descent has to always say. She keeps reminding people that tabouli is about the parsley and the mint, tomatoes, olive oil and lemon juice and not just the bulgar.

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1- Definitely, the tabbouli is about the parsley (not curley, please), the tomatoes, fresh mint, a bit of scallions, olive oil, lemon, and most importantly choosing the very fine bulgur. Don't saturate it with bulgur. Choose the very "blond" color bulgur. The authentic tabbouli doesn't have anything else as far as ingredients. Anything else that Lissome has mentioned are just Westernized versions. Another key thing is to eat it on romaine lettuce leaves, or cabbage leaves. You spoon it on the leaves, crunch into it and enjoy with a glass of Lebanese Arak!

2- Quinoa is totally different, as it has to be cooked. It's a very nutritious grain with a "nutty" flavor. I make it with a vegetables brunoise/stock and serve it with fish for e.g. instead of rice.

3- As far as your geo-politically oriented question, it isn't any different than asking why people that eat hamburgers or fries don't get along either. I am willing to suspect that North Korean and South Korean food has many similarities; so let's explain that one to Colin Powell?


"I hate people who are not serious about their meals." Oscar Wilde

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1- Definitely, the tabbouli is about the parsley (not curley, please), the tomatoes, fresh mint, a bit of scallions, olive oil, lemon, and most importantly choosing the very fine bulgur. Don't saturate it with bulgur. Choose the very "blond" color bulgur. The authentic tabbouli doesn't have anything else as far as ingredients. Anything else that Lissome has mentioned are just Westernized versions. Another key thing is to eat it on romaine lettuce leaves, or cabbage leaves. You spoon it on the leaves, crunch into it and enjoy with a glass of Lebanese Arak!

Amen to that!!! Sunday lunch at my family's house in North Lebanon was always fresh raw kibbe , a parsley rich Tabbouli with lettuce leaves (I do prefer Cabbage though), and Arak.

FM


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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As lemons have been mentioned so often, I would just like to say that limes are so much more superior. They are perfect for tabbouleh.

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As lemons have been mentioned so often, I would just like to say that limes are so much more superior. They are perfect for tabbouleh.

redevil:

When you say superior, what are you refering to? Do you think they have a better flavor than lemons when it comes to making Tabbouli? I think they are just different and certainly not traditional. Limes might be tasty (tastier than lemons!!! IMHO I don't think so), but they are just not middle eastern (Latin, thai maybe) and in my book they do not associate with Tabbouli. There is nothing like the flavor of parsley with lemons.

FM


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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I don't think I have seen lemons growing in the middle east (all we had in our garden were lime trees). I could be wrong though, as I am not an expert on the origins of these citrus fruit. At the end of the day it is a matter of personal taste (as opposed to what's traditional or not), and to me limes just have bags more personality than lemons.

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Lemons, limes, toe-may-toes, toe-mah-toes . . . I've lived in Turkey and they had plenty of lemons there. Actually, limes were quite scarce, as were grapefruit, but there were lemons and oranges by the cartload.

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Lemons have been cultivated in Egypt for more than a thousand years It was the Arabs who brought them to other parts of the Mediterranean.

In Egypt, small very sweet lemons, green in color and very fragrant are called limes, but the are in fact, lemons. Similar to our meyer lemon but not exactly.

In fact, the Egyptians are thought to be the first to make lemonade.

They did this by macerating lemon slices

with their rinds-on-with sugar, then leaving them overnight to be used as a base for an incredibly rich-flavored lemonade

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Am looking for a tabbouleh recipe. I am cooking BBQ for 35 folks the middle of September, and I think tabbouleh would be a good side. Any help would be appreciated.

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Hi there. This would be better posted on the cooking thread. I don't think there are any recipes in the Recipe Archive yet, but you could check there as well. Good luck!


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Thanks Marlene.........how do I get to cooking thread?

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Am looking for a tabbouleh recipe.  I am cooking  BBQ for 35 folks the middle of September, and I think tabbouleh would be a good side.  Any help would be appreciated.

I think I can help but you might have to scale it up to 35 people. My recipe feeds about 4 as a side.

I’ve never really written a recipe for my Tabbouleh so the following is an approximation but it should work out fine.

2 bunches flat leaf parsley

1/2 cup diced onions (small dice maybe ¼ inch)

12 mint leaves (or to taste, but I like it a little on the minty side)

1 cup diced fresh tomatoes

1/2 cup Bulghur (cracked wheat)

Juice of 2 lemons (or to taste)

1/3 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Salt and pepper

Finely chop the parsley and mint. Put them in a bowl, add the tomatoes, onions and bulghur and mix well. Now add the lemon juice oil and salt and pepper. Taste and adjust seasonings and acidity. Refrigerate for 30 minutes, so the bulghur can get a little soft then serve.

NOTE: If you plan on making it ahead of time. DO NOT mix it all together or the bulghur will get very mushy. Instead get everything ready and mix it up 30-40 minutes before serving.

Hope this helps.

FM


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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My advice is if you are scaling up is to try and make it in a fairly long and wide container - if you just use a deep bowl it can get quite claggy at the bottom, and doesn't mix too well.

You can soak the Bulghar in some vegetable stock fairly well ahead for it to soften, but don't add the other ingredients (Especially tomatoes and herbs) until the last minute.


I love animals.

They are delicious.

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You can soak the Bulghar in some vegetable stock fairly well ahead for it to soften

I have to object to this point, the bulghur should never be soaked alone for it to soften ahead of time or else it will be TOO soft once you mix it in and it sits for a while (a problem with many cafetria style/buffet places that serve middle eastern food). Mixing it in 30 minutes ahead of time is more than enough for it to soften a little and keep some texture and have a little bite to it.

I do second the idea of using a wide long conatiner though.

FM


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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And another problem with most Stateside taboule is that here it is a bulghar salad with oil, a little parsley and lemon, among other things. In the mid-east, it is strongly-lemon-dressed parsley salad with oil and bulghar, among other things.

There have been several previous discussions about this. For one thing, Tommy served it once at some sort of "do" and there was at least one thread (and I think there have been more, actually) devoted to it:

Taboule


Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Thanks to all of you for your help. Maybe baked beans would be a more appropriate side, but I am looking forward to trying your ideas for my own cooks. Thanks again.....................

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And another problem with most Stateside taboule is that here it is a bulghar salad with oil, a little parsley and lemon, among other things.  In the mid-east, it is strongly-lemon-dressed parsley salad with oil and bulghar, among other things.

There have been several previous discussions about this.  For one thing, Tommy served it once at some sort of "do" and there was at least one thread (and I think there have been more, actually) devoted to it:

Taboule

That is very true, parsley should be the dominant ingredient.

FM


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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