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Daily Gullet Staff

Bacon, Eggs and a Toast

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Maggie, what do you mean you WISH you wrote as well as Maureen Dowd? Maureen Dowd never makes me hungry.

Thanks for a great article.

--L. Rap


Blog and recipes at: Eating Away

Let the lamp affix its beam.

The only emperor is the emperor of ice-cream.

--Wallace Stevens

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oh, my! oh, my! i am just melting in all the sensuality of your prose. mo dowd doesn't have anything on you, maggie!!

now i am craving bacon and eggs and i'm at work :angry: . guess i'll just have to fry some up when i get home.

wonderful, beautiful words and imagry. thank you


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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I love those How to Cook a Wolfe pieces.


Noise is music. All else is food.

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With all that is said, that is what is for breakfast tomorrow am. gotta luv it!!!!

Funny you should mention that! I had bacon and eggs for lunch today with my parents, the lovers in this story. The toast was great -- my father's bread machine sandwich loaf, and the preserves were spectacular. My mother put up many jars of her apricot and plum jam this summer, so what with the B & E and the toast, I was fortified for the endless ordeal of Boxing Day air travel, and every traveller's nightmare: O'Hare at 6:00 pm.


Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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It may be late on a Tuesday night, but the sensuality of your prose has me slapping down the desire to go straight to the kichen and put the cast iron on the stove and add the bacon strips! I'm with the commenter who would add grits to the plate. Plate? Platter! And make that two eggs! I love the bacon schmutz added to the eggs--and I live in a condo overlooking a *big* city, Philadelphia, PA. The flavor of fryng the eggs in bacon dripping in cast iron far outwweighs the prettiness of doing them in butter in non-stick. How twee!

Thank you for your delightful prose.

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Thank you, Dorine.

There are three things that a well-regulated household can't be without: toilet paper, cat food (if you have feline masters) and bacon. I've tried the butter/nonstick thing recently because I was sadly sans bacon, and while it was an egg, it wasn't a real fried egg. No bacony flavor, no crispy edges, no dramatic dangerous sizzle as the egg hit the pan.


Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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