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Frenching a Chicken


halland
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Can someone explain the process of frenching to me, as applied to chicken? Recently I've seen where the lower joint of the chicken leg was cut off and then the tendon and skin were scraped clear of the bone and then pushed up to plump the leg.

I think there is also a way to bone the wing but leave it attached to the breast, or something like that.

Anyone familiar with these techniques or have a link you can post?

Hal

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afaik, a "Frenched" chicken breast simply means a skin-on breast with the breastbone and first two joints of the wing removed -- sometimes with the meat scraped off of the remaining joint of the wing.

When I am cooking drumsticks I always either cut off the knuckle (end joint) or, if I want it to look pretty, I run a sharp knife around the knuckle end of the bone to detatch the meat and tendons from that end. This results in a much more palatable and "thigh-like" texture. According to your description the latter process is "Frenching" the leg.

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Can someone explain the process of frenching to me, as applied to chicken?  Recently I've seen where the lower joint of the chicken leg was cut off and then the tendon and skin were scraped clear of the bone and then pushed up to plump the leg. 

Hal

That's pretty much it. Frenching is most commonly applied to rack of lamb or rack of veal.

I think there is also a way to bone the wing but leave it attached to the breast, or something like that.

Yes, this is called an airline breast. Seriously.

Drink!

I refuse to spend my life worrying about what I eat. There is no pleasure worth forgoing just for an extra three years in the geriatric ward. --John Mortimera

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We did the airline breasts at my culinary school. I just could not see the point of the project. Hacking off the knuckle, on the other hand, makes a lot of sense.

We also tunneled out wings and stuffed them with crabmeat and deep fried them for "Bangkok wings" at my school. Now THOSE were worth it.

This thread gets my nomination for best title this week, btw. :biggrin:

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afaik, a "Frenched" chicken breast simply means a skin-on breast with the breastbone and first two joints of the wing removed -- sometimes with the meat scraped off of the remaining joint of the wing.

I always liked the term "Statler Breast" for this treatment. Actually never heard or saw of it referred to as a Frenched chicken breast.

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I've always known of it as a suprême of chicken breast. 

Paul

Suprême is without the wing 'knuckle.'

Drink!

I refuse to spend my life worrying about what I eat. There is no pleasure worth forgoing just for an extra three years in the geriatric ward. --John Mortimera

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both processes are similar. To french the breast, just cut the web of skin that connects the bottom of the wing to the top, directly towards the joint. When you get to the bone, circle the bone with your knife, cutting all the flesh. Hyperextend the joint until it pops out niceley. Then roll the skin back. Now you can remove the breast from the carcass in your preferred manner.

Pretty much the same deal with the leg, but you'll have to work a little harder to get all the tissue from the end of the bone.

"Make me some mignardises, &*%$@!" -Mateo

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Thanks everyone for the quick replies. Did this last night for poulet a l'estragon, however when I tried to chop the knuckles off the legs, the bones just shattered? Knife is very sharp, but obviously I did something wrong. I did manage to cut myself though!

What's the secret to hacking the leg bone?

Hal

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Suprême is without the wing 'knuckle.'

I was responding to the "breast" end of the thread....

Thanks everyone for the quick replies.  Did this last night for poulet a l'estragon, however when I tried to chop the knuckles off the legs, the bones just shattered?  Knife is very sharp, but obviously I did something wrong.  I did manage to cut myself though!

What's the secret to hacking the leg bone?

Hal

I hope you are o.k.

If you are shattering bones, you have missed joints. Find the articulation of the joints, where movement takes place, and cut there - if you have to work too hard you are hitting bone and not connective tissue. Many times you can wiggle the knife back and forth to find the "notch" or depression between limbs, or limbs and the carcass - if you place your thumb at the shoulder notch - between the wing's main limb and the carcass - it is especially evident where the joint lies. Good luck,

Paul

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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Thanks everyone for the quick replies.  Did this last night for poulet a l'estragon, however when I tried to chop the knuckles off the legs, the bones just shattered?  Knife is very sharp, but obviously I did something wrong.  I did manage to cut myself though!

What's the secret to hacking the leg bone?

Hal

It's OK. Just remove the bone splinters and next time cut it closer to the knuckle.

Use the heel of the knife to do this. Keep your wrist and elbow firm and give it a good effort using your shoulder.

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It's OK.  Just remove the bone splinters and next time cut it closer to the knuckle.

Use the heel of the knife to do this.  Keep your wrist and elbow firm and give it a good effort using your shoulder.

Kuan!!!!! Nice to see you....TBH

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