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Your book is a bible in the kitchen. We use it all the time to help educate the waiters on the cheese plate.

My question is what is the best way to cut port salute. We like to use it as a cheese on sandwiches, because it melts so well and is mild enough for the mainstream to be able to enjoy it, but I am having a hard time getting it to cut so I can use it on a sandwich, grilled cheese, paninis, etc. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks for all of your information.

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Port-Salut, from one of the biggest cheese factories on earth, is THE cheese for people who don't really like cheese. It is completely without merit. Glossy, flabby and vaguely cheesy. There are dozens of better choices, cheeses with the same texture, cheeses that melt nicely, cheeses that are not strong, cheeses that actually have some link to the cows and to the pasture and to the people that make them; for instance, Morbier, raclette, Vacherin Fribourgeois, Fontina d'Aosta, Belgian Chimay, Tomme de Savoie. I know I'm sticking my big nose in where it wasn't asked to show up, but I hate it that you are helping to perpetuate silly cheeses like Port-Salut.

You'll have no trouble cutting sticky Port-Salut if you use a thin-bladed knife that you frequently dip in hot, hot water. You could also effortlessly cut cheeses of this semi-soft texture by employing a wire.

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