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Never too late!  When you've tried them, can you tell us more about the orange frangipane?  And will you used fresh mango, dried, ready to go filling?

I am making the mango filling from dried mango slices, dried apricots, orange zest and a little mango nectar. I am not adding any extra sugar.

The orange frangipane is a standard frangipane with the zest of two oranges and a sprinkle of grand marnier. If I had some orange oil on hand, I might add a little of that.

Edited by Swisskaese (log)
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Speaking of fillings for hamantashen, my friend Rachel Rappaport has a wonderful article on NPR today that is both informative and engaging:

Purim: Carnivals, Cookies and Candy

“Recently, there has been wave of 'nouveau' hamantaschen stuffed with apples, cranberries, chocolate and even mango. For my 21st-century hamantaschen, I created a recipe that uses a cream cheese-based dough, similar to rugelach, another Jewish pastry.”

She also has a recipe she makes for Fig and Ginger Hamantaschen using a cream cheese dough ...

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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That's interesting. I too, attempted a cream cheese based / rugelach type dough this year. Didn't turn out so well. Soft dough wouldn't hold it's shape. But the flat cookies with fruit topping tasted great! :laugh:

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I can't believe I've never made Hamantashen.( and I'm Jewish too). We're going to Ft. Lauderdale March 13th( to see my family) and I'd love to make a whole whack of these to bring them about a week before I go. Do you freeze well? Is there any fillings I should avoid?

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Just to brag but we figure our annual hamantashen assembly line produced 115-120 dozen hamantashen for the Temple. They are in the freezer at the temple kitchen. I'm pooped but only a little rest for the weary. I've got to start on my own.

So long and thanks for all the fish.
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A seasonally interesting article ...hamentashen in the Forward :wink:

The ones I sampled set the standard by which all hamantaschen should be measured. Slightly crunchy but not dry, salty and savory with the perfect amount of zesty filling, these are earthy, old-world hamantaschen, made with love. As far as I know, my bubbe never baked hamantaschen. But if she did, they must have been exactly like Moishe’s.
much more ...

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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A seasonally interesting article  ...hamentashen in the Forward :wink:
The ones I sampled set the standard by which all hamantaschen should be measured. Slightly crunchy but not dry, salty and savory with the perfect amount of zesty filling, these are earthy, old-world hamantaschen, made with love. As far as I know, my bubbe never baked hamantaschen. But if she did, they must have been exactly like Moishe’s.
much more ...

I was actually at Moishe's today - to pick up challah (so fresh, they put it in a wax bag because it was still steaming). I've had their hamantaschen and while I like the texture, I don't love the flavor of the dough. I find it too salty.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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A seasonally interesting article  ...hamentashen in the Forward :wink:
The ones I sampled set the standard by which all hamantaschen should be measured. Slightly crunchy but not dry, salty and savory with the perfect amount of zesty filling, these are earthy, old-world hamantaschen, made with love. As far as I know, my bubbe never baked hamantaschen. But if she did, they must have been exactly like Moishe’s.
much more ...

I was actually at Moishe's today - to pick up challah (so fresh, they put it in a wax bag because it was still steaming). I've had their hamantaschen and while I like the texture, I don't love the flavor of the dough. I find it too salty.

I agree with you. Their soft hamantashen are better in large part because the dough is not salty.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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That's interesting.  I too, attempted a cream cheese based / rugelach type dough this year.  Didn't turn out so well.  Soft dough wouldn't hold it's shape.  But the flat cookies with fruit topping tasted great! :laugh:

I had the same problem -- The dough would expand and come apart. But, as you say, they were very flaky, tasty cookies.

So I went back to a basic sugar cookie dough (Joy of Cooking). They hold their shape a little better, but they get soft and collapse.

I like the rugelach dough much better, if I can just figure out how to hold them together.

Back to the dough!

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It's a little late for this year but I'm always thinking about new hamantashen flavors. What about dulce de leche? Anybody think that would work?

So long and thanks for all the fish.
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It's a little late for this year but I'm always thinking about new hamantashen flavors.  What about dulce de leche?  Anybody think that would work?

Flavor - how could you go wrong? But I have visions of it oozing . . .

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  • 11 months later...

Bump.

It's getting near that time again. I just made some dough for Hamentaschen and stuck it in the freezer. I used the Richard Sax recipe from his "Classic Home Desserts." (I never used this one before, but his recipes never fail.) And I made a chocolate dough from a recipe I found on the web, which is a gamble but we'll see how it comes out. I'm not sure yet what I'll use for the fillings, but I have some time yet to think about that.

Anyone else even close to thinking about it?

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I like cherry filling for chocolate dough. I simmer dried cherries in a little water and rum or an orange liqueur with some sugar and then puree with an immersion blender. Orange filling would be good too.

I have been thinking about them, but don't know if I'll have time to bake many. I did get a case of halvah filling in last week . . what would be the best dough flavour for halvah filling?

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I love cherry and chocolate together, I might try that for the chocolate dough, maybe with some mini chocolate chips mixed into the dried cherries. I was also thinking of filling some of them with Nutella. (IOW -- taking the easy way out.)

Halvah filling would never last with me, I'd finish it long before it ever made its way to the hamentaschen! But I think halvah (any flavor) would blend well with a chocolate dough.

I also want to try those gingerbread hamentaschen you did last year, I think they sound great. I offered to bring hamentaschen to my synagogue this year, so I have to get cracking. I want to make and freeze all the elments so all I have to do is assemble and bake when Purim comes around. Last time I did this was three years ago, I remember they came out great but I don't remember which recipe I used. :hmmm:

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I did get a case of halvah filling in last week . . what would be the best dough flavour for halvah filling?

The one year I used halvah filling I used my gingerbread dough. The spice offset the sweetness of the halvah very well.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Gingerbread halvah sounds good . . very good. Maybe I'll do one batch of those, and a batch of cherry chocolate. Not much time for baking this year (Purim is much too close to Passover).

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  • 2 weeks later...

I made the Hamentaschen, but haven't been able to post until now. They were a big success. I especially liked the gingerbread ones. Hope y'all had a happy Purim!

gallery_2885_5182_170837.jpg

Chocolate with chocolate/dried cherry filling, before and after shaping.

gallery_2885_5182_227870.jpg

gallery_2885_5182_216410.jpg

Gingerbread with date/orange filling.

gallery_2885_5182_966809.jpg

Cream cheese dough with apricot filling. I also used this dough for a cream cheese filling, but there aren't any left for pictures.

I took some photos of them after they were baked, but my computer isn't cooperating. I'll get them up here a bit later.

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That's interesting.  I too, attempted a cream cheese based / rugelach type dough this year.  Didn't turn out so well.  Soft dough wouldn't hold it's shape.  But the flat cookies with fruit topping tasted great! :laugh:

I had the same problem -- The dough would expand and come apart. But, as you say, they were very flaky, tasty cookies.

I like the rugelach dough much better, if I can just figure out how to hold them together.

Be very careful not to overfill. After the hamantaschen are formed, and egg-washed, and on the cookie sheet, try putting the whole sheet in the refrigerator for 10 minutes of so before baking.

Edited by Sandra Levine (log)
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  • 11 months later...

I've never made hamantaschen and haven't eaten them since I was a kid. But I have a potluck to go to tomorrow, a bag of really good poppy seeds in the freezer (why are French poppy seeds so much better than those I've had in the US?) and would like to use the Joan Nathan filling recipe posted above. I just don't know what dough to use, and want one that's foolproof, especially in light of the fact that French flour is somewhat different from American flour. Suggestions?

Edited by Abra (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm bumping this thread back up. Its hamantashen time, what are you making?

Thanks to the influence here, I will be making yeasted with an apple strudel style filling, yeasted with orange frangipane, apricot gingerbread, and maybe chocolate with cherry.

Dan

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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