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I found cherry butter at the market yesterday. Of course I had to buy a jar for "experimental" purposes. I'm also tossing around the idea of dipping some of them in chocolate.

I also bought cute preprinted boxes for the mishloach manot. And Blovie found plastic containers printed with Happy Purim on them and filled with candy corn.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Andrea, I stopped by Holy Land Market just to check out their stuff the other day. They've got a whole bunch of conserves that could be really interesting to experiment with, though because they're expensive ($6 a not very big jar), I didn't buy any that time. The one I'm most intrigued with looks to be sweet tomato conserves, but they have morello cherry, fig, date, apple/cinnamon, and some other stuff.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Andrea, I stopped by Holy Land Market just to check out their stuff the other day. They've got a whole bunch of conserves that could be really interesting to experiment with, though because they're expensive ($6 a not very big jar), I didn't buy any that time. The one I'm most intrigued with looks to be sweet tomato conserves, but they have morello cherry, fig, date, apple/cinnamon, and some other stuff.

I've wanting to go over there for the past week or so (I need a botnim americayim fix). Maybe I'll get there early next week. The fig sounds intriguing.

Thus far, the plan is one batch of gingerbread-apricot (one batch yields about 70). And I'll make one plain batter and fill those with prune and cherry. I'm going to dip some of the cherry ones in chocolate.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Andrea, I stopped by Holy Land Market just to check out their stuff the other day. They've got a whole bunch of conserves that could be really interesting to experiment with, though because they're expensive ($6 a not very big jar), I didn't buy any that time. The one I'm most intrigued with looks to be sweet tomato conserves, but they have morello cherry, fig, date, apple/cinnamon, and some other stuff.

I've wanting to go over there for the past week or so (I need a botnim americayim fix). Maybe I'll get there early next week. The fig sounds intriguing.

Thus far, the plan is one batch of gingerbread-apricot (one batch yields about 70). And I'll make one plain batter and fill those with prune and cherry. I'm going to dip some of the cherry ones in chocolate.

Is it possible to get the recipe for the gingerbread Hamentaschen????

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This recipe is actually for gingerbread men but it works very well for hamentaschen.

Here's the recipe:

4 cups all-purpose flour

1 tbl ground ginger

2 tsp ground cinnamon

1 tsp salt

1/2 tsp grated nutmeg

1/2 tsp ground cloves

1/2 tsp baking soda

1/2 pound (2 sticks) unsalted butter (I use margerine to keep pareve)

2/3 cup light or dark brown sugar

2 large eggs

2/3 cup unsulfured molasses

2 12 oz jars of apricot butter

1. Place dry ingredients (except sugar) into mixing bowl and stir well to combine.

2. In mixer, cream butter and sugar. Add eggs, one at a time until the mixture is smooth. Add half the flour mixture. The stop and scrape the bowl and beaters. Pour in molasses. Scrape again, and add the remaining flour mixture, just until combined.

3. Divide dough into serveral pieces and press each piece into a rectangle about 1/4 inch thick between 2 sheets of plastic wrap. Chill at least 1 hour or until firm. (Personally, I just wrap the whole thing in saran and break off pieces to roll out)

4. Preheat oven to 350

5. Roll out dough and cut with floured cutters. Spoon/pipe apricot butter into center and form into hamenaschen. Place on cookie sheets lined with parchment --allow for expansion. Scraps can be rerolled (it helps to refrigerate)

6. Bake about 10 minutes (in my oven it takes about 8). The cookie will be a little soft.

Makes abour 70 hametaschen, using a 4 inch round cookie cutter

These actually get better with age because the spices intensify.

Edited by bloviatrix (log)

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I went last night to one of our favourite bread bakers in Tel Aviv and they had Hamentashen ready for the taking. We are going to a friends for Shabbat dinner tonight and decided to start Purim early.

They had:

Chocolate chips and pastry cream

Apple Strudel - chopped apples and cinnamon

Poppy seed

Marzipan

Date and walnut

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Being that I had never tried a yeast hamentaschen, I stopped into Moshe's this afternoon and got a prune one. To quote Blovie "it's nothing more than a triangle danish." I've got to agree with him on this one. Although, it was pretty tasty.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Andrea, I stopped by Holy Land Market just to check out their stuff the other day. They've got a whole bunch of conserves that could be really interesting to experiment with, though because they're expensive ($6 a not very big jar), I didn't buy any that time. The one I'm most intrigued with looks to be sweet tomato conserves, but they have morello cherry, fig, date, apple/cinnamon, and some other stuff.

I went to Holy Land yesterday. Decided against the fig because I'm concerned it will bubble over. Instead, I picked up halva spread which can be used in baking. Halva hamentaschen, perhaps dipped in chocolate? My mouth is already watering.

It occurred to me last night night that lemon-poppy seed hamentaschen would be nice -- a lemon cookie dough with mohn filling. Alas, we don't like mohn so if anyone wants to take my idea -- it's yours.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Hi everyone,

I'm trying the bloviatrix's gingerbread ones now. (Just put one batch in the oven.)

I chopped up some dried apricots and added them to apricot preserves which I've done in the past. The apricot bits plump up a bit and I can use a little more filling without the boil-over problem. The kitchen smells really wonderful.

Then I'm off to pack Purim baskets at our synagogue.

(I'll be making some of the plain kind later with my children. Not only are they not going to be interested in the gingerbread ones but they don't even want filling in the ones they do eat.)

jayne

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I'm done with my baking. We have regular hamentaschen filled with prune and with cherry butter, gingerbread-apricot and gingerbread-halvah. I ran out of apricot lekvar and the only thing I hadn't used yet was the halvah spread. They're really decadent and good. I think I'm onto something new.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Hi everyone,

I'm trying the bloviatrix's gingerbread ones now. (Just put one batch in the oven.)

I chopped up some dried apricots and added them to apricot preserves which I've done in the past. The apricot bits plump up a bit and I can use a little more filling without the boil-over problem. The kitchen smells really wonderful.

Then I'm off to pack Purim baskets at our synagogue.

(I'll be making some of the plain kind later with my children. Not only are they not going to be interested in the gingerbread ones but they don't even want filling in the ones they do eat.)

jayne

Hi Jayne -- My kids never liked the "traditional" fillings and neither did I as a kid. That's why I also fill with nutella or make a caramel-pecan filling and a sweet cheese (think cheese danish) filling.

So long and thanks for all the fish.
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That's why I also fill with nutella or make a caramel-pecan filling and a sweet cheese (think cheese danish) filling.

First- thanks for sharing your yeast-dough recipe a while ago. I haven't had a chance to try them but I will (who says hamantashen are just for Purim?)

Now - caramel-pecan?? Is there a recipe or is it just a caramel candy and some pecans? I'm a sucker for anything with caramel..

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I'm done with my baking.  We have regular hamentaschen filled with prune and with cherry butter, gingerbread-apricot and gingerbread-halvah.  I ran out of apricot lekvar and the only thing I hadn't used yet was the halvah spread.  They're really decadent and good.  I think I'm onto something new.

That halvah concoction sounds wonderful, and the gingerbread too!

(I wish somewhere would sell those)

The smell coming from Moishe's is just too much- the neighbors were actually talking about it, and I heard people on the street who were walking in the sleet to "find that smell." That's how you know Purim's coming!

I haven't tried the soft hamantaschen yet because it didn't look like it would equal my love of those big buttery ones I adore, but maybe tomorrow.

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FYI--- I make my hamentaschen parve. I used the Earth Balance (trans-fat frere) margerine for both batters. I was a little nervous because I had a disaster with a cake last month, but it worked out great. No problems at all.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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That's why I also fill with nutella or make a caramel-pecan filling and a sweet cheese (think cheese danish) filling.

First- thanks for sharing your yeast-dough recipe a while ago. I haven't had a chance to try them but I will (who says hamantashen are just for Purim?)

Now - caramel-pecan?? Is there a recipe or is it just a caramel candy and some pecans? I'm a sucker for anything with caramel..

First of all, the yeast dough recipe is flaky but not sweet. It's better for larger hamantashen where you really want to focus on the taste of the filling. In my opinion, for smaller ones, you need a sweeter dough.

I know it's a little late for this year but here's the caramel-pecan filling. It comes from Judy Zeidler's "The Gourmet Jewish Cook" book. This makes a lot!

3/4 cup sugar

1/4 cup water

2 cups toasted chopped pecans (chopped pretty fine)

7 tablespoons unsalted butter or margarine

1/2 cup warm milk

1/4 cup honey

In a heavy saucepan, boil sugar and water just until sugar dissolves. Reomve from heat and add the pecans, butter and milk. Return to heat and boil for about 10 minutes, stirring constantly, until the mixture is thick. Remove from the heat and stir in the honey. Transfer to a heat proof bowl, allow to cool, then cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until set. This will keep (if you don't just eat it with a spoon) for at least a week in the refrigerator though I've often had it around for 2-3 weeks with no probelm.

Also, here's the sweet cheese filling. It's great on it's own or combined in a hamantashen with a berry or other fruit filling.

Cream 8 ozs. cream cheese. Add in 1/4 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon flour, 1 egg yolk, and 1/2 tsp. vanilla. Beat until smooth and creamy. That's it!

So long and thanks for all the fish.
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The gingerbread ones were yummy. Thank you again, bloviatrix, for the recipe.

I had some extra dough scraps and decided to try a two tone cookie. (If there is a hamantaschen police, I'll probably be reported.) Anyway, I was aiming for a kind of spiral looking cookie so I rolled out 2 rectangles of dough, put one on top of the other and rolled them up and sliced them. I didn't make the log fat enough. I should have remembered what diameter I needed for my circles. So after I made slices, I had to flatten them a bit which blurred the spiral a bit. They still came out kind of cool looking. The prettiest ones had a kind of "trim" that surrounded the filling. The less pretty ones had a marble effect or something like the Gateway Computer cow pattern. The underneath side looked very cool though, with a spiral pattern, even though nobody really looks at the underside. The apricot filling was also kind of clear so you could see a bit of pattern from the top.

All in all, I'd probably try it again but with a chocolate dough and a plain dough. Maybe just go for the "trim" effect. It would be less alarming to the traditionalists.

Happy Purim everyone!

jayne

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The gingerbread ones were yummy. Thank you again, bloviatrix, for the recipe.

:smile::smile:

Glad you like them.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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  • 11 months later...

OK people. It's that time of year again. People are asking if they can order Hamantashen (why do they think I have more time to make them than they do??) - and I got a shipment of hamantashen in that are already selling.

So I made a couple of batches this week - preparing a column that I then realized I wouldn't need - since the paper comes out the day after Purim.

I made a pear filling - and a sour cherry filling. Loved both of them (especially in chocolate/ginger and lemon scented crusts). But I ran out. So I grabbed a can of that poppyseed filling off the shelf to fill the rest of them... and it is TERRIBLE. I like poppyseeds - when they are good - but this stuff is just tasteless and grainy.

Anybody have a good poppy recipe that they actually like? :smile: Or should I just stick to fruit fillings?

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  • 2 weeks later...
OK people.  It's that time of year again.  People are asking if they can order Hamantashen (why do they think I have more time to make them than they do??) - and I got a shipment of hamantashen in that are already selling.

So I made a couple of batches this week - preparing a column that I then realized I wouldn't need - since the paper comes out the day after Purim. 

I made a pear filling - and a sour cherry filling.  Loved both of them (especially in chocolate/ginger and lemon scented crusts).  But I ran out.  So I grabbed a can of that poppyseed filling off the shelf to fill the rest of them... and it is TERRIBLE.  I like poppyseeds - when they are good - but this stuff is just tasteless and grainy.

Anybody have a good poppy recipe that they actually like?   :smile:   Or should I just stick to fruit fillings?

I do have a poppyseed filling I like. I will look it up tonight when I get home. I'll trade you a poppyseed recipe for a sour cherry. :rolleyes:

I fill mine with apricot lekvar and date & walnut. This year I am going to try and experiment and make an apple filling with just chopped granny smith apples, cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamon and sugar.

I wonder how an orange curd filling with pomegranate syrup would turn out? Do I bake them with a curd filling?

Edited by Swisskaese (log)
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I do have a poppyseed filling I like. I will look it up tonight when I get home. I'll trade you a poppyseed recipe for a sour cherry. :rolleyes:

I fill mine with apricot lekvar and date & walnut. This year I am going to try and experiment and make an apple filling with just chopped granny smith apples, cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamon and sugar.

I wonder how an orange curd filling with pomegranate syrup would turn out? Do I bake them with a curd filling?

Michelle - it's pretty much a sour cherry lekvar. Dried cherries, sugar and water. Simmer and puree. I added some thick (cold) chocolate ganache to some of them (dough, small piece of ganache, cherry, fold) and they were great.

I would think that the curd would boil up, over and out of the hamantashen. If you can figure out a way to bake them hollow :blink: that would be just dandy. Let us know :laugh: .

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I would think that the curd would boil up, over and out of the hamantashen.  If you can figure out a way to bake them hollow  :blink: that would be just dandy.  Let us know  :laugh: .

That is what I was afraid might happen. I don't think I have the patience to figure out a way to make a hollow hamentaschen.

How about frangipane with chopped pears?

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How about frangipane with chopped pears?

I'd eat those. Have you used fresh fruit before? I haven't (scared it will give off too much liquid) ... but using dried pears for another lekvar is good too :wink:

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No, I am going to use dried pears. However, I think it will be ok to use fresh apple.

This is the best poppyseed filling I have ever had. Don't worry, I rewrote the recipe.

Joan Nathan's Poppy-Seed Filling

1 pound sugar

1/2 c water

1lb poppy seeds

2 egg whites

1 tsp vanilla

Rind and juice of 1 lemon

Rind and juice of 1 orange

2 tbsp rum

4 oz raisins

4 oz figs, chopped

Cinnamon to taste

2 c apricot jam

1/2 cup unsalted butter or margarine

Add water and sugar to a pot and cook at a low simmer. Make sure that you stir the mixture.

Put the poppy seeds in a food processor and grind them. You could also use a blender. Place the poppy seeds in the pot of sugar and water.

Add everything, but the jam and butter. Cook over low heat for about five minutes. Add butter and apricot jam and stir until the butter has melted and everything is mixed together. You can use this mixture immediately or you can put in the fridge until the mixture has firmed up a bit.

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We were disappointed with the cherry filled hamantaschen I made last year - the feeling was that the filling was too tart for the dough. Just something to think about.

I'm planning on making my batters next saturday night and sunday will be devoted to baking. Just the usual gingerbread-apricot and standard with prune. Maybe some halvah filled.

I'm already dreading this coming week. It's going to be very hectic.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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