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Venison


snowangel
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All of my hunter friends and family are sensitive.

We are very aware of the loss of life to sustain our life and celibrate that. I think that this has a lot more honor than that plastic wrapped steak in the supermarket.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Field dressing:  take the musk glands off the rear legs at the knee.  Cut off genitals.  Slit belly to breast bone; innards fall out.  Go back and cut out the anus, cut pelvic bone to remove lower guts.  Cut windpipe, cut breast plate and open it up to remove heart, lungs, liver.

And to think, I still have a hard time killing lobsters. :unsure:

-- Jason

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my mum in the US accidently knocked down a deer while driving back home. she called her handyman and his wife to help lug the deer back home. then, they cooked it!  :huh:

My husband (rural Scotland) had an encounter with a roe after a night on call - the resulting dishes were entitled 'RoadKill' from daube to roast! Being a ruminant you have to work fast and get rid of the inners...liver was good too. Local gamekeeper did the butchery for the Antlers -car repair bill wasn't tasty !

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well I'm kicking myself now. I somehow get a periodic e-mail from Lidia Bastianich. The one that arrived this evening includes a recipe for Venison Ossobuco. I asked Paul if we would get the shanks, and he assured me that it was unlikely.

I'm going to have to take charge next time of the taking it to the butcher process.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I just finished reading about hepatitis (sp) and green onions from Mexico, and thought about how fortunate some of us are because we know where most of our food comes from. For example, our onions, greens and beets are still coming out of the garden.

We eat lots of fish we catch and also lots of game others bring us . I don't hunt anymore. One of the hallmarks of a good hunter - or fisherman - is how he's cared for his kill.

Our neighbor loves to hunt. His wife refuses to cook game for him. Consequently. we got lots of venison this fall. perfect. The neighbor makes sure hehangs the carcas for the right amount of time, butchers it correctly, and goes to great effort in the packing and wrapping.

We find most game (and wild fish) so rich that we don't ear near as much as we would of farm-raised meat.

A little bit of loin rubbed with crushed juniper berries, salt and pepper, then quickly seared in some good oil or duck fat is just about as good eating as you can get. Surly much better and safer than Mexican green onions.

dave

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  • 8 months later...

Just got a two pound venison loin from a friend who said the loin was tough and dry when cooked. She admits it may have been cooked too long. But, does anyone know if brining will tenderize and moisturize venison? Any reason not to brine?

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Fascinating -- I cook venison loin all the time and if properly prepared, it should be the most tender, moist cut from a dear. It is true that venison is a very, very lean meat and even the slightest amount of overcooking would make it tough and dry. I think the biggest secret is to cook it very rare.

I've never brined a venison loin so I don't have an answer to that but if you are worried about it being dry, you could always wrap it in bacon or lard it for extra fat.

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There's no doubt that it will work -- the only question is if you will like the end result. "Red" meats like lamb and beef aren't usually brined, but that's because they have lots of internal fat, and brining isn't necessary. Despite its superficial similarity to these meats, venison is quite lean. I'd try it.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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I'm of the Will Rogers ilk, I never met a meat I wouldn't brine, or almost at least. While deer is at least wild more and more our meats have become leaner and therefore beneift from brining. The real trick is how long? I learned the basic formula for a brine from a John Ash class I took and I find him to be a wonderful teacher. His general guide is 1/3 cup Kosher Salt & 1/3 cup brown sugar to 1 quart of liquid. Like he says, don't vary the formula vary the brining time till you get it right. Beyond that whatever spices/flavors you'd like to add. Personally I think it sounds great, let us know how it turns out!

Charles a food and wine addict - "Just as magic can be black or white, so can addictions be good, bad or neither. As long as a habit enslaves it makes the grade, it need not be sinful as well." - Victor Mollo

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while not exactly brining - i use more spices than salt- i do venison sauerbrauten all the time. leaving it to soak at least 3 days, a full week if i can manage it.

dang... now i want venison and all i have right now is buffalo at home.

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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  • 2 months later...

i just received a moderate sized venison loin from some friends in Pennsylvania. i'd like to serve it as the centerpiece of a holiday meal. please give me some preparation ideas (i'd like to stuff it) along with some side suggestions. thanx!

Edited by mighty quinn (log)

"Ham isn't heroin..." Morgan Spurlock from "Supersize Me"

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My next-door neighbour & one of his brothers are bow hunters -- October is the month in which I receive (free!) venison cuts.

I would enjoy the loin stuffed with wild apples, carrot, and onions. Gotta have juniper berries as well! Cranberry sauce, mustard relish, mushrooms, and sauerkraut are big-time accompaniments, too. Wine: Côtes du Rhône or a California Syrah.

Brown it with bacon, carrots, onions, and celeriac – then roast the loin in a moderately hot oven. Flavour the pan juices with orange juice, red-currant jelly; season & thicken with pouring cream. Serve the roast with corn cakes or spätzle. Book recommendation: A Taste of the Wild by A.J. McClane.

"Dinner is theater. Ah, but dessert is the fireworks!" ~ Paul Bocuse

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  • 1 year later...

The phone rang at 6:30 am. My FIL: "Do you want a doe? If so, I can meet you at the meat market at about 1:00 pm and deliver it."

So, I've been to the meat market, and left my deposit. I did agree to pay the $20.00 skinning fee.

I want as much in roasts, steaks, stew meat as possible. The rest will be ground, with a minimal amount going to salami.

Said doe was a "nice sized" doe. Not too big, not too little. It has not been weighed. Thanks to my great relationship with this butcher, he will call me once it's skinned and has had a better look so I can modify my order, if need be. I love my butcher. It sure paid off to take in smoked brisket after I purchased my first brisket from him to smoke!

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Oh! Oh! waving hands, get the tenderloin, marinate in red wine and garlic, rub with cumin and coarse black pepper. Cook on grill nice char on the outside rare inside. let rest, cut on the bias in thin pieces and wrap around dollops of mashed sweet potato load with butter and some chipoltle chili powder.

**************************************************

Ah, it's been way too long since I did a butt. - Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

--------------------

One summers evening drunk to hell, I sat there nearly lifeless…Warren

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Yes, I will get everything from this doe, and there may be another deer in my future! I just love having the freezer stocked with nice venison so that I don't have to trot to the market for anything but milk and veg!

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Venison Sausage w/footgear

Mice in Place:

1 Deer

1 Pig

Spices

Casing

Skin Deer (reserve hide for mocassins)

Grind Hog

Mix Ground Hog with Spices

Stuff Ground Hog into Casings

Dispose of Deer Carcass

SB (not real big on venison) :sad:

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I was fortunate enought to get some venison last season and made

sausage. This is my version:

Lean venison: 80% + fresh pork fatback: 20%

Marinated for 24 hours in red wine, splash of brandy, crushed juniper

berries and black peppercorns, rosemary, bay leaves, sliced shallots

and some yellow mustard seeds.

Remove bay leaves, grind all medium coarse, taste and adjust seasoning,

stuff into casings, age 24 hours then eat or vacumn seal and freeze.

The flavorings complemented the venison without masking it.

I made 10lb. and wish I had made more.

I know it's stew. What KIND of stew?

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snowangel . . . My sister used my Aggie brisket recipe on a leg of venison and it was fabulous. This isn't really a recipe, more of a technique. You put lemon pepper, black pepper and salt on the meat. Put it in a cooking bag with 6 cups of double strong coffee (she used hazelnut cream flavor and thought that added something) and about 4 heads of garlic whacked in half. She started it at 250 F, turned it down to 225 F and went to bed. My nephew reported that it was about the most succulent piece of venison he ever chomped. To make the leg fit in the bag, she had cut off the shank and threw it in the bag. That may have added some gelatin.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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