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Adega in Denver-What do you think?


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Fred:

Thanks for your reply to my "Sources" post - I think we're on the same page as far as evaluating Denver options. BTW - picked up fresh mussels, clams, and Dungeness crab from Oliver's for Christmas Eve dinner (beautiful briny smell - so fresh) - combined with cod from Wild Oates and some frozen shrimp for a nice stew.

My wife and I will be eating at Adega next week - any menu suggestions beyond what has been posted?

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I don't have any further menu suggestions, but I would love to hear from you after your meal to see what you thought.

Fred Bramhall

A professor is one who talk's in someone else's sleep

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  • 4 weeks later...

Went back to Adega recently for the tasting menu experience and was informed they change the selections every two weeks. The second experience was just as sublime as the first. Our main server was the guy who dished out the bread on our last visit (and he was the best and most professional staffer we encountered, so we were happy to see him again).

Bread selections were similar (kalamata, a couple of sour doughs, etc). I tried the luscious honey wheat and the sour dough with poppy seeds. Amuse bouche was a sliver of dressed-up salmon.

First course: Soft boiled egg salad with a hidden brioche, "potato foam," and a bit of caviar (I could have sworn they said it was Iranian, although the menu didn't specify). They pronounced it to be a "7 minute" egg that served as the centerpiece. Served with a sparkling wine from Franciacorta, Italy (NV Bellavista Cuvee Brut). My second favorite dish of the evening that would not be out of place on a brunch menu.

Second course: Pan seared arctic char with winter onion and goat cheese fondue, lemon and micro greens. Served with 2001 Josmeyer Le Dragon Riesling from Alsace, France.

Third course: Bourbon cured pork belly with corn & ham salad and baked bean sauce. This was the best course (and I didn't expect it to be from reading the description, as I am not a big fan of either bourbon or beans), but maybe just because it strangely brought up memories of good Texas BBQ for me. Served with the best wine of the night, an '02 Margerum "M5" from Santa Ynez Valley, Cali (lots of luck finding this one though--it was in a numbered bottle).

Fourth course: Roast red deer saddle with stewed mushrooms, squash mezzalune, and sage emulsion. We both thought the divine little "squash pockets" were the best part of this dish. Served with a '95 d'Arenberg "Twentyeight Road" Mourvedre from McLaren Vale, Australia. The least impressive wine of the evening (and a good argument for not making 100% mourvedre wines).

Fifth course: Affidelice cheese course with sweet-tart apples and candied thyme leaves. There were little gelatinous cubes paired with the tiny diced apples. A little tricky to scoop up with the fork, but tasty. Paired with an '02 Savary "Selection Vieilles Vignes" Chardonnay from Chablis, France.

Sixth course: Mint crepe beggar's purse with spiced tangerine mousse and sauce. Paired with an '02 Telmo Rodriguez "MR" Moscatel, Malaga, Spain. Creative dessert, but a little too intense for more than a tasting portion (which is probably the idea, right?). :biggrin:

“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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Fred:

Sorry this is late and will be truncated - it's late.

Adega was very nice. If I had written this down earlier I'd have better details.

Tasting menu when we went was the same as what rim posted. I was tempted but didn't opt for it as I knew my wife was only up for a couple courses and it was a weeknight. By the end of the meal I was happy with my choice as I am primarly a recreational cook as opposed to a restaurant epicure. Not sure I would have been able to appreciate 7 courses on a Thursday, as modest as they are. We opted for three courses each.

I started with the clams, which were perfect - except for foreign matter. I managed to bite down hard on a hidden chunk of shell, which I never would have mentioned at a lesser restaurant. I very casually mentioned it to the busboy (not sure what the right title is here - he was excellent) when he came to offer more bread. It very closely resembled a broken plate shard. When I mentioned this, our waiter was back (who had not been overly attentive - no complaints there) within 2 minutes to apologize. After telling her it was no big deal, the manager swung by shortly thereafter, assuring us that we would'nt be charged for that course. I honestly couldn't have cared less about the $12, but the gesture was nice.

Sweetbreads were tremendous. A contributor to why I was happy not to go the full 7 courses - so rich.

My wife had a baby carrot dish in a wonderful stock - I wish I could remember the description. So simple and so good. Maybe rim remembers seeing it on the menu?

Finished with short ribs. Very good. But I can do rustic at home. Sounds like a small meal but I left full. (Because I was'nt drinking that night - limited to one excellent glass of wine - and finished two bottles of sparkling water?) Enough to make anyone feel old. But pleasantly so.

Service made it all worth it. A rare thing in Denver. Couldn't have asked more of the staff - clam shell aside. They were professionals in a city that doesn't have many. Even in the better places. Even Mel's in Cherry Creek, which I like very much, doesn't have the same balance of professionalism and comfort.

rim - how was the pork belly? It was the main dish that attracted me to the tasting menu and sounded amazing -

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Service made it all worth it. A rare thing in Denver. Couldn't have asked more of the staff - clam shell aside. They were professionals in a city that doesn't have many. Even in the better places. Even Mel's in Cherry Creek, which I like very much, doesn't have the same balance of professionalism and comfort.

rim - how was the pork belly? It was the main dish that attracted me to the tasting menu and sounded amazing -

I couldn't agree more about the service--there are other places in Denver which have service staff that are better than the average in Denver, but the average in Denver is very low.

Adega is the only restaurant in Denver where I have had service that is comparable to world class restaurants outside of Denver.

Not to mention the food--I've got to go back soon.

Fred Bramhall

A professor is one who talk's in someone else's sleep

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We had discussed Marcek's in an earlier post.

Haven't seen hide nor hair of the rude fish guy.

Someone else primarily working the meat/fish station. Very cool guy with a gray braid. Haven't gotten his name.

Oysters have been great for the last 4 wks or so - at Oliver's and Marcek's.

Had a good poker weekend. Spent the proceeds on doughnuts Sunday morning and a $30 porterhouse from Marcek's - ate it with my three sons tonight. Nine-year-old and twin 6-year olds got a kick out of the concept of the $30 steak. A new gamecube game to them but a good dinner to me. 2+ pounds of very rare, dry-aged beef. Winter Weber. Enjoyed by all.

Tilapia for my wife (also from Marcek's) tasted distinctly musty afer cooking, but smelled clean raw. Anyone know why that might be?

Sorry to digress so far from Adega.

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  • 3 weeks later...
I read Westword's reviews--mostly I can't stand the reviewer, whose name escapes me right now. It's not just that he doesn't talk about the restaurants enough, it's his whole style of acting the part of the hip kitchen insider who knows all about what goes on behind those closed doors and is kind enough to regale us with his insight. I guess that would not be so bad if he could back it up, but I don't think that he does.

The reviewer is Jason Sheehan (already mentioned in this thread), and I love his writing style. He used to write for the Alibi here in ABQ, and I doubted his credentials at one time, too: he mentioned in his bio his "thousands of nights" of accumulated kitchen experience.

When I questioned him on that (because of his young-ish age of around 30), he did the math for me: 12-14 hour shifts, 6 or 7 days a week, since the age of 15. He estimated nearly 3900 kitchen days in total.

I was humiliated, but to his credit he remains a very friendly correspondent. :-)

Miss Tenacity

in ABQ

"You can't taste the beauty and energy of the Earth in a Twinkie." - Astrid Alauda

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Food Lovers' Guide to Santa Fe, Albuquerque & Taos: OMG I wrote a book. Woo!

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I think Jason Sheehan is a good writer, but I don't think that he is a good restaurant reviewer. I don't doubt that he has worked many hours in kitchens, but that is not a prerequisite for reviewing--many reviewers have never cooked professionally and are much better reviewers than Sheehan.

Maybe he is a frustrated short story writer--his reviews, IMHO, read more like short fiction. That being said, he may be perfect for Westword as he inspires discussion and controversy.

Fred Bramhall

A professor is one who talk's in someone else's sleep

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Ah - I think you may have hit on the issue. I like good writers, but don't have any qualifications to determine if someone is a good restaurant reviewer.

All I know is that all of the reviews he did for Albuquerque's Alibi made me salivate and want to rush on over to each and every place to try them out. So, for me, he was a good reviewer. :laugh:

Andrea

"You can't taste the beauty and energy of the Earth in a Twinkie." - Astrid Alauda

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Food Lovers' Guide to Santa Fe, Albuquerque & Taos: OMG I wrote a book. Woo!

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So, we've cleared that up nicely! I actually still read Jason because I like his writing and because I can't help myself, being addicted to food and food related things, but he frustrates me.

Is Alibi Albuquerque's "alternative" cultural weekly rag, as Westword is Denver's?

Fred Bramhall

A professor is one who talk's in someone else's sleep

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  • 3 months later...

On the last evening of a six-day business trip to Denver, I had time to hook up with an old friend and foodie who lives in the area. I was already thinking of visiting Adega based on some glowing reviews on the web, but since he's the native, I thought I'd let him make the call. It turns out he already had plans to take me to Adega, so clearly we're on the same wavelength.

The restaurant has a modern decor, with a central focal point, a glass-enclosed wine cellar which itself contains thick glass shelving subdivided into rectangular bins, full of wine bottles. It radiates the low-level blue light of thick clear glass, and to a wine aficionado, it's a beautiful sight. We're seated, and the wine list and menus arrive. The wine list is wonderful, covering nearly every wine-growing region and subregion of interest, with just enough depth in each. The menus come in two forms: a six-course tasting menu, and a second menu divided into vegetable, fish, and meat sections, from which the diner can cobble together a custom tasting menu. I opted for the six-course menu, and my friend rolled his own. We shared just about every dish, but I only have the menu from the six-course, so I'll only report on that. I chose the wine-pairing option for the six-course menu.

Split Pea Ravioli

Porcini Mushrooms, Tendril Salad

2002 Frattori & Graney, Pinot Grigio, Delle Venezie, Italy

A pair of ravioli were flanked by meaty mushrooms in a sauce redolent of truffles. The ravioli had a nice toothy bite, with a tender sweet pea filling that blended well with the mushroom and truffle aromas. The pinot grigio was a crisp complement to the dish. This was really nice, but I was a little worried at this stage that six courses might not be enough, as the portion was quite small.

Rock Shrimp-Lobster Cake

Whole Grain Mustard Soup, Fava Mash

2002 Kunin, "Stolpman Vineyards", Viognier, Santa Ynez Valley, California

A cylindrical cake of shrimp and lobster meat was presented in a bowl with a puree of fava beans. At tableside, our server then poured a steaming yellow-orange soup around the cake. I found the shrimp and lobster cake to be relatively subtle in terms of flavor, but surprisingly, so was the mustard soup. It was very mild, flavored with the slightest hint of citrus fruit, and in conjunction with the floral scents of the viognier, I think this dish was as light as the preceding vegetable dish. Again, the portion here seemed small.

Seared Pacific Black Cod

Crispy Sweet Breads, Soft Potatoes, Lemon-Thyme Jus

2001 Thornbury, Pinot Noir, Marlborough, New Zealand

Wonderful dish. The cod was prepared perfectly, with a crisp exterior and juicy, tender flesh. The sweetbreads provided a chewier, meatier bite, and the diced potatoes, while a little less than crispy, had a wonderful potato flavor that sometimes gets lost in the quest to provide the perfect potato texture. The lemon-thyme sauce tied the whole thing together without dominating the dish. A really nice blend of ingredients and preparations.

Roast Poussin Breast

Duck Liver Sausage Stuffed Leg, Lentil, Frisee, Orange Salad

2001 Domaine la Soumade, "Cuvee Prestige", Cotes du Rhone Villages, France

Another wonderful dish. The poussin was also done perfectly, with flavorful tender meat; the stuffing provided additional savory flavor, and the lentils and frisee provided texture. We noticed at this point that every dish so far, including the choices my friend made for his menu, seemed to incorporate fruit in some way to bring up the flavors of the dish, without becoming a showcase for the fruit. I don't know if this is representative of the chef's work, but we were both impressed with the way the fruits were worked into the dishes seamlessly to provide extra flavor and balance.

Camembert Cheese Course

Brioche Toast, Dried Fruit Chutney

Alvear, "Carlos VII", Amontillado, Montilla Moriles, Spain

I'm not a huge fan of cheese courses, but this was reasonable, and the fruit chutney was sweet and spicy without being overwhelming. The sherry was surprisingly strong, and cut through the camembert perhaps a bit too much. This was the only wine pairing of the evening that didn't hit the mark; other that this, I found the sommelier's choices to be quite nice, and he did an excellent job of describing each pairing as it was presented during service. In particular, the shrimp-lobster cake with the mineral viognier and the cod with the pinot noir were excellent pairings.

I also noted that my earlier concerns about portion size were unfounded; at this point in the meal, I was becoming comfortably full.

Adriatic Fig

Mascarpone Whip, Lady Fingers, Port Jus

Graham's, "Six Grapes", Reserve, Oporto, Portugal

Without the port, this could have passed for a savory course. The fig was tart, the mascarpone was not sweetened, and the lady fingers were buttery without being sugary; the port wine sauce surrounding this was syrupy, but not particularly sweet. With the port, however, the whole dessert came together. A nice dessert which I really enjoyed, but which might not appeal to people who really want that strong sugar fix at the end of the meal. I should note at this point that we splurged and added a passion-fruit custard as another dessert, because it looked too tempting to pass it up, and I can verify that this would satisfy a sweet tooth quite nicely.

The six-course tasting menu was $69, with an additional $45 for the wine pairings. At those prices, given the quality of the food and wine, the level of service, and the total dining experience we enjoyed, Adega represents a remarkable value. I'd happily return.

Jeff Shufelt

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Wow. Thanks for the detailed post, jshufelt.

I've only been to Adega twice (once more than Sting), but now I am reminded why I should return soon.

I want to check out Chef Moscatello's new place in Cherry Creek, Mirepoix, first though.

“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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Tasting menu has already changed at Adega since jshufelt’s visit. Our two previous trips were near opening in the early evening, but this time we had a late dinner. The service was still good over-all, but had approached perfection before. Food was unbelievable (still my favorite in Denver). If I could get out of there for less than $300, I’d be there more frequently.

Our line-up (with links to descriptions of the wines):

Amuse Bouche - Chicken Terrine

Arugula Vichyssoise

Brioche Crisp, Heirloom Relish

2002 Chateau Haut Rian, Bordeaux Sec, France

Our main server wasn’t quite as polished and kept going on about the “VEEEK-UH-ZAYZ” on the tasting menu before we realized he meant the Vichyssoise. :smile: Small mound of diced heirloom tomatoes with a brioche crisp balanced across the top like a sea-saw. The neon green pureed potato and leek concoction was poured into the bowl at our table. I’m not a big fan of cold soups like this and gazpacho, but the Sauv Blanc/Semillon blend served with it was a perfect sipper for a June evening.

Baby Lettuce and Frisee

Small Pickles, Chilled Poached Pike, Boiled Egg Dressing

2002 St. Innocent “Shea Vineyard” Pinot Gris, Willamette Valley, Oregon

The flavor of the dressing and sweet pickles reminded me of my mom’s deviled eggs (which I love, so that’s certainly not a slam to the chef’s gourmet sensibilities). This tied with the next two courses for being the best of the bunch.

Butter Braised Halibut Cheeks

Parsnip Mash, Grapes, Sweet Shallot, Parsley

2001 Kooyong Chardonnay, Mornington Peninsula, Victoria, Australia

Wow. I can’t find the words for this. Succulent. Another server wisely brought by spoons for us since the halibut was sitting in a foamy pool of goodness that was no match for a fork. Who would’ve thought that grapes would work perfectly in this? Amazing.

Roast Squab

Foie Gras-Fig Ravioli, Rosemary-Riesling Jus, Mint

2000 Heinrich “Pannobile” Zwiegelt/Blaufrankish, Burgenland, Austria

Meaty-tasting with a brown jus. My palate did not detect the mint. Tiny, bony portion of poultry with two dreamy ravioli stuffed with foie gras. I can die happy now. I think this is the first Austrian wine I’ve ever had. Certainly the first Austrian red. The young sommelier on duty (not Chris Farnum) indicated the grapes are akin to Pinot Noir and said he’d visited the Heinrich’s winery in Austria and it is “very high tech.”

Gratte-Paille Cheese Course

Honey Glazed Carrots, Currant Paste

2002 Alfred Gino Bertolla, “Domaine du Granit” Moulin-a-Vent, Beaujolais, France

I’d never had Gratte-Paille before (think Brie meets L’Explorateur). Yet again, the chef blew my mind by pairing a cheese with items that didn’t sound all that fabulous (Carrots?! Currant?!), but it worked. How do they work this voodoo magic? My only real quibble is we had our cheese course on the table for five minutes and the accompanying wine had still not been poured. We had to alert another server walking by. When you’re paying an extra 45 bucks a head for Wine Pairings, you’d like them to all be served with the courses.

Crème Fraiche Risotto Pudding

Vanilla Cookies, Macerated Cherries

2003 Marenca “Pignoto” Brachetto d’Acqui, Piedmont

The red sparkling wine (which reminded us of Lindemans Kriek) and the cherries made this work. The risotto base was not sweet on its own.

“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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sorry to always ask about price, but how much is this tasting menu with and without the paired wines? can one get out of there <$300 if one doesn't drink quite as much wine?

in other news the anniversary is coming up. i remember that at the april egullet dinner a lot of people were recommending luca d'italia as the place to go. however, none of you are posting detailed, loving descriptions of food you ate there. hmmm.....

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$69 for tasting menu per person (food only).

$45 for the wine pairings per person.

With tax that's about $250 + 20% tip or more = around $300 min.

You will be stuffed. I only had a $2.00 sandwich from a street vendor at 11 am that day plus a glass of wine @ Cap. Grille's lounge about three hours before our dinnertime. Still stuffed. It's deceptive since they bring everything out in small portions.

You can order items off of the regular menu for less. However, I am so enamored with the tasting menu I can't even contemplate the regular offerings. Perhaps someone else can help you with the price points on the regular menu.

“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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Mongo, I cannot stand "snobby" service and I've never encountered it at Adega. Granted, I've never been there without having wine & I've only been three times, but I don't get the feeling that it's a "wine geeks" only type of place.

“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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both these meals--and experiences--sound good; definitely putting a visit to adega on our list. however, if i can be so crass as to ask, what were the prices associated with all these meals? (other than $12 for the clams.)

I don't remember spending much more than $180 for the two of us, including tip. We only had a couple of glasses of wine, though, and Adega is certainly built around the wine cellar.

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  • 1 month later...

I am happy to confirm that not only can you order the full tasting menu at the wine bar, but you still receive excellent service even if you're only drinking tap water.

Here's the current menu:

Essencia Glazed Bay Scallops

Foie Gras Butter and Apricot Marmalade Sandwich

2003 Josef Leitz "Rudesheimer Drachenstein" Riesling, Rheingau, Germany

Black Bass

Caramelized Parsley Root, Leeks, Rock Shrimp, Tomato, Mascarpone Fondue

2001 Domaine Ostertag, Pinot Gris, Alsace, France

Pancetta Wrapped Rabbit Loin

House Made Egg Noodles, Asparagus, Truffles

2001 Walter Hansel "Cahill Lane" Pinot Noir, Russian River Valley, CA

Roast Rack of Lamb

Morels, Peas, Potatoes, Sherry Jus

1998 Leeuwin Estate "Prelude Vineyards" Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, Australia

Fourme d'Ambert

Balsamic Tossed Figs, Black Walnut Dust

Smith Woodhouse "Lodge Reserve" Oporto, Portugal

Peach Brulee

Gingered Blueberry Relish, Ginger Snaps

2001 Telmo Rodriguez "MR" Malaga, Spain

***Side note - Anybody been to Mirepoix or Table 6 yet???***

“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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***Side note - Anybody been to Mirepoix or Table 6 yet???***

Yes to Table 6 -- if you read Colorado AvidGolfer, then you can find my review in the next issue, which comes out in a couple of weeks, but suffice it to say, I was less than enamored. I've also been to Mirepoix and will reserve judgment until they've gotten their sea legs, which, I believe, will take some time. I will say that the wine wall is brilliant.

-Midson-

A gourmet who thinks of calories is like a tart, who looks at her watch

-James Beard-

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Will eagerly await your review, Lori. Does anyone else buy a golfing magazine just for the food reviews? :biggrin:

The bartender at Adega recommended the chocolate beignets at Table 6 so that piqued my curiosity.

“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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  • 1 month later...

Well, we went back to Adega last week, there were 6 of us. It was not as stellar an experience as our last visit. Our waiter was somewhat stiff and pretentious. We attempted to loosen him up, which only had an effect after he poured a glass of champagne down the back of one member of our party. He, the restaurant and Brenda (the victim) all handled it as well as could be expected. Business cards were exchanged, dry cleaning bills were discussed, apologies were made etc.

5 out of the 6 of us ordered the tasting menu, 4 out of the 5 had the accompanying wines.

I didn’t save the menu, so I have only my notes, which do not include wines or dessert.

1) The Amuse: rabbit braised on a round of brioche w/ apricot sauce and a bit of apple reduction

Delicious. Italian sparkler, also delicious.

2) crème fraiche latke topped with cooked egg whites, formed into a disc with caviar, topped with an almost raw egg yolk, a little beet sauce.

I found this dish to be less than successful. The latke (which was really more of a custard), was great. There wasn’t enough caviar to notice, which was the dishes downfall. It basically was a deconstructed soft boiled egg since the caviar flavor was missing in action. The beet sauce was nice, but the too typical a few drops here and there on the plate, so it was more of a color than a flavor.

3) diver scallop w/foie gras and crystallized orange rind.

Good flavor combination—the orange rind and foie gras were delicious together, B+.

4) rabbit cooked 3 ways. A mini rack on a bed of white truffle risotto w/white truffle foam, a crepinette—caul fat wrapped around leg meat wrapped around loin w/a demi sauce, and dipped in batter and fried on a bed of mache w/ some kind of little ham chips in it (was supposed to be a cobb salad variation).

The mini rack and risotto was very good, the crepinette a little overcooked and the demi pretty salty, the cobb salad good.

5) veal cheeks on julienne romaine w/ a demi sauce.

The veal cheeks were delicious—fall apart tender, flavorful, moist. The romaine underneath was a waste of time—it added nothing to the dish. The sauce was fine, but nondescript. The veal cheeks came parading out of the kitchen—I watched 2 servers, 3 plates apiece approach our table, realize that we weren’t cleared and set for it yet, and parade right back into the kitchen. Much scurrying and readying of table, and they reappeared 3 minutes later. Half way through this course we received the wine that went with the cheeks.

6) 3 year aged gouda w/ pumpernickel croutons.

There was something else on this plate—a little chutney or something--I can’t remember. This dish was just silly—literally 2 tiny chips of cheese on each plate, would have worked for an amuse, but if you’re serving a cheese course then give me a little cheese to eat please.

7) dessert—I fell down on the job. Good chocolate ice cream with some other stuff.

All in all the food did not seem to hit the mark as well or as often as on our first visit, and the crew just seemed out of sync, too many glitches for the caliber of restaurant and the price.

Fred Bramhall

A professor is one who talk's in someone else's sleep

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Hmm...I hope they're not letting Adega slip due to focusing more energy and time on Mirepoix. We had an issue the time before last with the timely arrival of our wine for one of the courses like you did on this visit, so hopefully it's not becoming a habit.

(And here I thought we would see a Frasca review from you after Labor Day, Fred.)

“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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Yeah, I had to reschedule the Frasca reservation due to some football game or other taking place in Boulder at the same time. Go figure.

Fred Bramhall

A professor is one who talk's in someone else's sleep

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