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battle of the collars


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All my life I have loved broiled yellowtail collar. Savored the succulence of the flesh against the crispy skin, but now I am a little tired of it after so many years and I have been ordering salmon collar more.

What do you like?

Any other fish collars?

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Dave, it's kind of like the collar bone, the bony section near the gills.

Keller at French Laundry carves this down to create salmon "chops".

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

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Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I am partial to maguro (tuna) collars.

I have to admit i was unfamiliar with this term collar as I have only heard called by its Japanese name "kama" or kamayaki referring to the grilled style in which it is usually prepared.

For those unfamiliar with it, here is a nice picture of buri kamayaki (yellowtail):

http://www.betterhome.jp/shunippin/12buri/buri.html

My husband and I end up ordering two serving becasue I like it with the sauce and he likes the salt version.

I make them at home quite a bit too, but with the sauce! :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 6 months later...

I just had the best kama of my life this past Saturday, it was an ahi kama and it had no sauce and it was the most tender thing I have eaten, it almost melted in my life. Too bad nothing else at this new Hawaiian restaurant I went to had anything else that came even close to that good. I may go back just for that ahi though! :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Thank you, Kristin, for reviving this thread. You are so wonderfully efficient and friendly about keeping people on topic! I imagine the collars from an ahi are quite large, no?

I love hamachi kama, and it's what I see most often in restaurants. I often see smoked salmon collars in the markets, and those are okay if you need a hit of unsubtle, over-the-top, processed bacon-of-the-sea Omega-3 fatty acids.

This is the first time I've read this thread, and there hasn't been much discussion of what they are actually like to eat. The meat from these areas, like the cheek and covering the gills, are compact and surrounded by fish bone, as they have a particular purpose - fin control, chewing, etc. The meat is usually fine textured, and has irregular shapes, unlike a filet with it's large, regular flakes. The appeal of the collars is that they often are gelatinous and fatty if from fatty fish, so the overall effect is quite luxurious. It can take some dexterity and tenacity to get the meat out with chopsticks, but it is delicious.

I look forward to trying halibut, maguro and ahi collars.

~Tad

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I didn't know you could train them to a leash.

Seriously, what is a fish collar?

you coordinators without portfolio are supposed to know everything.

it's not like you have any specific ministerial duties to take care of.

Herb aka "herbacidal"

Tom is not my friend.

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  • 6 months later...
  • 1 month later...

I picked up a HUGE maguro (tuna) collar yesterday for only 380 yen (about $3.50), I broiled it (only seasoned with salt and pepper) and served it with lemon wedges.

heaven....... :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 9 months later...

I wasn't sure if I should post this here, or in the Fuyu, winter foods thread:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=33811&hl=buri

I ran into some Hamachi Kama at the grocery store the other day, and attempted Buri-Daikon: :biggrin:

BuriDaikon.jpg

It was quite good!

I sort of followed these recipes:

http://www.suresave.com/recipesofhawaii/sa...e_sep_2001.html

http://www.tsuji.ac.jp/hp/jpn/jp_e/kanazaw...dai/buridai.htm

Next time, I am going to try making miso-salmon kama, which I had once at a restaurant and was really good.

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Yellowtail collar! Salt grilled, please. With lots of lemon juice squirted over it. One time I ordered it at a Japanese restaurant in the DC area and it was drowing in teriyaki sauce. ICK! Totally ruined the flavor for me.

Anyone have suggestions on how to salt-grill collars at home?

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Yellowtail collar!  Salt grilled, please.  With lots of lemon juice squirted over it.  One time I ordered it at a Japanese restaurant in the DC area and it was drowing in teriyaki sauce.  ICK!  Totally ruined the flavor for me.

Anyone have suggestions on how to salt-grill collars at home?

Yasuko-san's directions:

http://www.nsknet.or.jp/~chrkaji/yasuko/recipe/067_e.html

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I usually just call it kama (and most restaurants in NYC call it kama) however, I've usually seen kama translated as "neck."

I've alway been partial to buri or hamachi. However, have visited one sushi bar in Shinbashi which serves humongous maguro kama. Very tasty!

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  • 4 months later...

Hamachi are the same as buri (yellowtails) but are younger and thus smaller than buri.

Still confused?

Yellowtails are 'shusse uo', changing their name as they grow.

The kama is a sickle-like portion of a buri.

Kama = Sickle

Yaki means grilling.

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from the Daily nihongo thread:

word for 9/13

well I think we are done with buri! :biggrin:

let's take a look again at the names at different stages of life:

STAGE-- KANTO NAME (KANSAI NAME)

big adult-- buri (buri)

adult-- warasa (mejiro)

young adult-- inada (hamachi)

juvenile-- wakashi/wakanago (tsubasu/wakasa)

baby-- mojyako (mojyako)

Please remember that these names can vary depending on who you are talking to and what part of Japan you are standing in, for an even more detailed list of the names used in different parts of Japan look here (Japanese):

http://chisiki.sub.jp/MorinoKigi/NamaenoKi/SyusseUo.htm

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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